Connect with us

Games

Get on the Squid Game train if you haven't already – PC Gamer

Published

on

PC Gamer is supported by its audience. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more
By
Netflix show Squid Game is a brutal new offshoot of Battle Royale and the game genre it inspired.
Masked men love inviting hundreds of people to private islands to participate in death games, especially when it’s to prove a point that probably could’ve been proven without building an underground crematorium. It’s a wasteful approach to ethics studies for sure, but it makes for great TV, so chuck Squid Game into the old Netflix queue if you haven’t already. 
The nine-episode Korean series was obviously inspired by Battle Royale, the 2000 movie that gave the videogame genre its name, but shuffles in the unpredictability of a janky CS:GO minigame mod, to stretch a little for a game comparison. It’s videogame-adjacent, let’s say: It features adults playing children’s games (one way to describe the staff of PC Gamer at times) and there’s some thematic kinship, like lots of unnecessary murder. Squid Game is certainly the most violent show I’ve watched recently.
The official description on Netflix is intentionally evasive. “Hundreds of cash-strapped players accept a strange invitation to compete in children’s games,” it says. Any media-aware person will be certain about where the show is going from the start, but the first episode builds anticipation for as long as it reasonably can with a story about a dad evading gambling debts. The tone is soapy at times, frequently comedic and hard to call serious—Uncut Gems is a very different kind of story about a Gambling Debts Dad—but you’d also struggle to call Squid Game upbeat. Especially not once the shooting starts.
When the violence kicks off for real, the scale and coldness of it is mildly shocking, even for a horror fan. Rather than lingering on gruesome injuries, inviting us to appreciate the artistry and excess of the practical effects like a Tarantino film would, Squid Game just gets on with things, with few exceptions. That’s what makes it feel so brutal: Outside of a few emotional sendoffs, the contestants are treated with even more indifference than GTA pedestrians, sometimes even by each other. Headshots are delivered like offsides violations.
Try to appreciate the meta comedy of the show cutting from what sounds like Americans yelling an erotic Twitter roleplay thread at each other to the lead Korean actors giving it their all.
The rest of the show can be eerily lighthearted in contrast by focusing on the schoolyard dynamics that emerge among the players of these deadly kids’ games: bullies, tattletales, gossips, cheaters. It’s also fun for how thoroughly Squid Game buys into its world, where vans are rigged with sleeping gas and soldiers who wear identical masks have sorted out a system for figuring out who’s supposed to be where. Whenever it gets back to the games, it never misses an opportunity to explore the cruelest implications of its premise. I somehow failed to foresee a couple of the meanest twists despite them being bleedingly obvious, and “I should’ve known that would happen” is a fun reaction to have.
Squid Game’s ending goes out of its way to segue into a potential second season, which is slightly disappointing in a show that otherwise dishes out finality, contrasting physical death with the drawn out suffering of social death. There are also some English-language parts in the latter half that are so mortifyingly bad they nearly ruin the conclusion, but perhaps that’s just comeuppance for all the times American shows have botched the directing of non-English parts without me noticing. Be prepared to stick them out, and try to appreciate the meta comedy of the show cutting from what sounds like Americans yelling an erotic Twitter roleplay thread at each other to the lead Korean actors giving it their all.Squid Game is number one on Netflix for the second week in a row, so recommending it now feels a bit like pointing out that Drake recently put out a new album, but I almost skipped it myself. The bright colors and cheesy-looking PlayStation button masks had me expecting something like ‘Black Mirror meets TikTok Fortnite memes’ at first glance. It isn’t that, and I can at least guarantee that it’s better than the other stuff I’m seeing in the Netflix Top 10 right now, such as a show in which people “catfish their way toward $100,000.” (I guess Netflix’s next big bet aside from making videogames is ‘Black Mirror, but let’s do it for real.’)
And if watching Squid Game gets you wondering what it’d be like to play its Joker-fied versions of playground games, the Roblox community already has that covered. It’s also showing up in Minecraft and Fortnite Creative (see tweet below), and I expect a CS:GO Squid Game map any day now. Red Light, Green Light is finally getting its moment in the modern gaming spotlight.
playing squid game in fortnite #SquidGame pic.twitter.com/kGcxKxUy17September 27, 2021
Tyler has spent over 1,200 hours playing Rocket League, and slightly fewer nitpicking the PC Gamer style guide. His primary news beat is game stores: Steam, Epic, and whatever launcher squeezes into our taskbars next.
Sign up to get the best content of the week, and great gaming deals, as picked by the editors.
Thank you for signing up to PC Gamer. You will receive a verification email shortly.
There was a problem. Please refresh the page and try again.
PC Gamer is part of Future US Inc, an international media group and leading digital publisher. Visit our corporate site.
© Future US, Inc. 11 West 42nd Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10036.

source

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Games

$500M blockchain gaming proposal Game7 to come online with backing from industry veterans – Cointelegraph

Published

on

source

Continue Reading

Games

Ohio State vs. Penn State: Live stream, watch online, TV channel, prediction, pick, football game spread, odds – CBSSports.com

Published

on

Play Now
Football Pick’em
Play Now
College Pick’em
Start or Sit (NFC Home Games)
Covering the impact of coronavirus on the sports world
No. 20 Penn State travels to Columbus on Saturday to square off with No. 5 Ohio State in a game that once looked to be one of the best games of the season. The divisional showdown has lost a bit of luster in recent weeks, however. Earlier this month, many anticipated this being a clash between two top-five teams battling for Big Ten East supremacy and a possible College Football Playoff. Unfortunately, a lot has changed since.
While the Buckeyes recovered nicely from its early-season loss to Oregon and dominated its Big Ten competition, the Nittany Lions cannot say the same. Going on the road and losing to Iowa 23-20 after losing quarterback Sean Clifford late in the first half was forgivable and understandable. Losing 20-18 in nine overtimes to 3-5 Illinois last Saturday is something different. Not only did that knock Penn State down 13 spots in the AP Top 25, it all but eliminated it from Big Ten title contention. The Nittany Lions now have two conference losses in a division with three teams that have yet to lose a conference game. 
The good news for Penn State is that it still gets to play all three starting this weekend, but the bad news is there’s little reason it can beat all three. 
It’s better for the Big Ten if Ohio State wins: We’re almost to the time of year when playoff rankings will be released. If you’re the Big Ten, the most important thing is that you get at least one team in the playoff, but ideally, you’d love to get two. A Penn State win here would seriously hurt any chance of the latter coming to fruition. It would be Ohio State’s second loss of the season and history has shown that two losses are one too many.
With both Michigan and Michigan State playing earlier in the day, the conference will be down to only one undefeated team by kickoff. Of course, if you’re a Penn State fan, you don’t care about any of this, nor should you. All you care about is ending a two-game losing streak and getting the season back on track. 
This could be the start of C.J. Stroud’s Heisman campaign: Stroud has been on fire in October. Although he threw for 484 yards and three touchdowns in Ohio State’s loss to Oregon, he’d been failing to live up to the lofty expectations that Buckeyes fans have for their QB after watching Justin Fields. 
After sitting out of the Akron game because of an injury, Stroud has been lighting up the Big Ten. Over his last three games, he’s thrown for 1,032 yards, 14 touchdowns and no interceptions. Of course, he’s done this against Rutgers, Maryland and Indiana, so it hasn’t garnered much attention. But if Stroud can keep that up by lighting up a good Penn State secondary, you can be sure his Heisman candidacy will receive a significant boost.
Penn State needs to figure out a way to run the football: It’s been a serious problem for the Nittany Lions all season long, not just in their last two losses. This offense ranks 99th nationally with an average of 3.54 yards per carry, 99th in rushing success rate (48.7%) and 116th in total rush EPA (-40.73). There’s only been one game this season in which the Lions averaged at least 5.0 yards per carry, and that was a 44-13 win over Ball State in which they finished with exactly 5.0 yards per carry.
One of the best ways to slow down the Ohio State offense is to keep it off the field, and the best way to do that — particularly when you have a banged-up QB like Clifford — is handing the ball off. If the Nittany Lions are going to go to Columbus and shock the world, they’re going to have to run the ball somehow.
Date: Saturday, October 30 | Time: 7:30 p.m. ET
Location: Ohio Stadium — Columbus, Ohio
TV: ABC | Live stream: fuboTV (Try for free)
This point spread is not an accurate reflection of the difference between these two teams at their best, but it accurately depicts where they are right now. Clifford was well below 100% during Penn State’s loss to Illinois, and if he’s not healthy, an already limited offense becomes even more of a liability. Also, losing defensive lineman P.J. Mustipher for the season had a noticeable impact on the Penn State rush defense against Illinois. Now that same unit has to stop running back TreVeyon Henderson while also covering all the weapons Ohio State has in the passing game. I just don’t see how Penn State can keep up with this Ohio State team right now. Prediction: Ohio State (-18.5)
Which college football picks can you make with confidence in Week 9, and which top-10 team will go down hard? Visit SportsLine to see which teams will win and cover the spread — all from a proven computer model that has returned almost $3,900 in profit over the past five-plus seasons — and find out.
© 2004-2021 CBS Interactive. All Rights Reserved.
CBS Sports is a registered trademark of CBS Broadcasting Inc. Commissioner.com is a registered trademark of CBS Interactive Inc.
Images by Getty Images and US Presswire

source

Continue Reading

Games

Sony's PS5 redesign is much lighter – but does it look any different? – Creative Bloq

Published

on

Creative Bloq is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more
By Daniel Piper 21 July 2021
We just hope it’ll be easier to get hold of.
If you’ve managed to get anywhere near a PS5 in the last few months (no mean feat considering the console’s popularity), you’ll know that it’s big. Very big. Ever since the machine was launched last year, its gargantuan size has been the subject of countless mocking memes. But a slightly more svelte PlayStation 5 could already be on the way.
As spotted by one Twitter user (below), tweaked PS5 manuals appear to confirm a new ‘digital edition’ model, which is a whole 300g lighter than the standard version. It isn’t clear exactly how this weight loss will be achieved, but the arrival of a new model could be good news for anyone who hasn’t managed to get hold of one yet (here’s where to buy a PS5 if you fancy your chances).
It appears a PlayStation 5 Digital Edition revision (CFI-1100B) is being listed by Japanese retailersThis revision is 300g lighter than the previous model (CFI-1000B) and also features a different screw https://t.co/zQOSkzfdn8July 20, 2021
It seems the new PS5, listed as CFI-1100B, will weigh around 3.6kg as opposed to the current model’s 3.9kg. Not only that, but the new model will no longer require a screwdriver when adding or removing the stand. Hardly a groundbreaking design tweak, but hey – perhaps you’ve found yourself desperate to stand your PS5 up sans screwdriver.
Still, it’ll be interesting to see if Sony has made any other design changes to shave off that 300g. We’ve already heard that the company is planning a redesign in an attempt to get stock moving again – a shortage of semi-conductors is behind delays to the production, and Sony is keen to “find maybe a secondary resource”, or speed things up by “changing the design.”
Playstation 5
We can’t help but hope Sony does take the opportunity to tweak the appearance of the PS5. Maybe it could take a cue from this wildly popular all-black PS5 mod. Or even this ridiculous water-cooled PS5. Whatever happens, anything that speeds up the production line is a good thing in our book. Until then, check out today’s best games console deals below – and be sure to take a look at these awesome Nintendo Switch deals.
Read more:
Daniel Piper is senior news editor at Creative Bloq, and an authority on all things art, design, branding and tech. He has a particular penchant for Apple products – some corners of the internet might call him an ‘iSheep’, but he’s fine with this. It doesn’t bother him at all. Why would it? They’re just really nicely designed products, okay? Daniel is also a comedian and national poetry slam champion, and his favourite Bond is, obviously, Sean Connery.
Sign up below to get the latest from Creative Bloq, plus exclusive special offers, direct to your inbox!
Thank you for signing up to Creative Bloq. You will receive a verification email shortly.
There was a problem. Please refresh the page and try again.
Creative Bloq is part of Future plc, an international media group and leading digital publisher. Visit our corporate site.
© Future Publishing Limited Quay House, The Ambury, Bath BA1 1UA. All rights reserved. England and Wales company registration number 2008885.

source

Continue Reading

Trending