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Nvidia's 'Ampere Next' GPU Is Coming in 2022 – Tom's Hardware

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‘Ampere Next Next’ coming in 2024
During his GTC 2021 keynote, Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang revealed a roadmap for its upcoming GPUs, CPUs, and DPUs. We’ve already covered the Grace CPU, which should arrive in 2023, but the more interesting bit for gamers is the GPU. While Nvidia listed the GPU as “Ampere Next,” we expect the GPU codename will actually be Hopper. That means Nvidia’s next CPU and GPU combined will be Grace Hopper, after the computer scientist who pioneered many aspects of computer programming languages.
We don’t have any concrete details on Hopper / Ampere Next yet, though it’s safe to assume it will be faster and better than Ampere. Perhaps more importantly, it won’t arrive until 2022, so anyone hoping for a sequel to Ampere this year will have to wait a bit longer. Which is perhaps all for the best, considering that it’s basically impossible to buy any of the best graphics cards right now — unless you’re willing to pay two to three times the official prices, anyway.
What will Hopper / Ampere Next entail, though? Current Ampere GPUs are manufactured on both TSMC N7 (GA100) and Samsung 8N (all of the consumer models — GA102, GA104, and GA106). That split could continue, but almost certainly the data center and HPC solution will come via TSMC, probably on the N5 process. That change should allow for even more GPU cores and transistors. The consumer side could potentially switch to TSMC as well, depending on how quickly TSMC can ramp up its wafer starts.
Based on past releases, we expect the Ampere Next / Hopper GPUs to launch with RTX 4000 series branding, and the top model (ie, RTX 4090) would likely outperform the current offerings by at least 25–30 percent, in situations that are GPU limited. We’ll probably see fourth-gen Tensor cores and third-gen RT cores, each boosting performance over the current solutions.
And unless things have dramatically improved by 2022 [Ed: Dreams are free!], they’ll all still sell out immediately after launch, at least for a few months.
But there’s still hope for the follow-up to Ampere Next / Hopper. That is currently listed as “Ampere Next Next” in the roadmap, and we don’t have a guess as to the future codename (Babbage, Lovelace, Euclid… feel free to guess your favorite scientist). We do know that Nvidia expects it to ship in 2024, which means it will probably utilize TSMC’s N3 process or something similar, cramming even more GPU goodness into the package. By that point, we might even have consumer GPUs with more than 100 billion transistors.
Jarred Walton is a senior editor at Tom’s Hardware focusing on everything GPU. He has been working as a tech journalist since 2004, writing for AnandTech, Maximum PC, and PC Gamer. From the first S3 Virge ‘3D decelerators’ to today’s GPUs, Jarred keeps up with all the latest graphics trends and is the one to ask about game performance.
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Sony to keep making PlayStation 4 as PS5 output hits snag – New York Post

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Sony’s plans to mass produce its new PlayStation 5 gaming console have been put on hold because of disruptions in the global supply chain — forcing the company to keep cranking out its older PS4 systems.
The Japanese tech giant had initially planned to phase out manufacturing of PS4 at the end of last year and move to a full transition to its newer consoles, according to Bloomberg. But now it is pivoting to produce as many as 1 million of the old models in 2022.
After introducing the PS5 in November 2020, supply has been scarce due to shortages in advanced chips and other commodities needed to mass produce the hardware.
This past November, Sony reduced its PS5 production outlook. Initially, it aimed to make more than 16 million units in the year ending in March, but that number was trimmed to 14.8 million.
The older PS4 is cheaper to make and uses less advanced chips and software than its successor. Released in 2013, the PS4 has sold more than 116 million units and remains popular among gamers.
The PS5, which offers more sophisticated graphics and faster loading times than the PS4, was also met with great fanfare. As of September 2021, it has sold 13.3 million total units — surpassing the 7.6 million units that the PS4 sold in its first year of availability nearly a decade ago.
Sony told assembly partners late last year that it is pivoting to manufacture more PS4 consoles this year, though a company spokesperson denied that it had planned to discontinue production altogether.
“It is one of the best-selling consoles ever and there is always crossover between generations,” a spokesperson told Bloomberg.
This past fall, Sony reported a 27% increase in sales in its gaming division for the three-month fiscal quarter that ended on Sept. 30. The firm credited the popularity of the PS5.
In total, the Japanese conglomerate’s gaming division recorded $5.7 billion in sales during the three month period starting in July. Operating income fell 21% to $727 million while the company generated $10.8 billion in revenue.
Sony isn’t the only gaming company that is relying on its older technologies to keep profits flowing during the supply chain crunch.
Last year, Nvidia, the US firm that makes processing units for gaming consoles, revived its previous generation of GTX 1050 Ti graphics cards due to the shortage in semiconductors.
While the company never officially discontinued production of the card, it was not listed for sale as recently as November 2020.
The card was first introduced in 2016, but was gradually phased out in favor of the newer 16-series cards, according to PC Gamer.
Market observers say that the supply chain crisis and chip shortages will likely last through this year.
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