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Having your breakfast before 7am might make you live longer – Metro

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NEWS… BUT NOT AS YOU KNOW IT
If you were on the hunt for a healthy breakfast idea, you may have already missed the boat for today.
A new study has revealed that the times we eat may have an impact on our health, and eating at the ‘right’ time can even prolong our lives.
The long-term research project was undertaken by City University of New York, with scientists tracking 34,000 Americans aged over 40 for several decades.
Volunteers were tasked with tracking their eating habits, logging when they had meals and snacks, which researchers then recording death rates over the course of the study.
They found that the optimum time to eat breakfast is between 6am and 7am, and participants who did this were 6% less likely to die prematurely than those who ate at 8am and 12% less at risk of early death than the 10am contingent. 
The study, published in the Journal of Nutrition, is one of the first of its kind to study longevity in relation to the first meal of the day. Although previous research has focused on eating late, scientists were keen to see if breakfast had the same impact.
Midnight snacking has been shown to contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, two of the major conditions that were looked at in this experiment.
It’s thought that this is due to the brain’s ‘food clock’, an internal system that regulates hormones like insulin, and that an off-kilter meal can disrupt the signals it sends.
Our bodies’ glucose levels naturally peak at certain times a day. As food-related hormones burn up this glucose from the bloodstream, eating later means levels stay high. Consistently high blood glucose can then lead to diabetes, obesity, and heart disease.
So while a lazy brunch won’t send you to an early grave, these results do show the benefits to breaking the night’s fast first thing.
A simple bowl of porridge or avo toast could see you living a healthier, longer life – which means no more excuses for skipping breakfast.
Do you have a story to share?
Get in touch by emailing MetroLifestyleTeam@Metro.co.uk.
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10 Celebrities Living With Diabetes | News – BET

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(Photo: Getty Images)
The month of November ignites thoughts of buffet spreads of comfort food, planning the perfect outfit for the living room, and preparing witty responses to your aunt’s questions.
However, November is also National Diabetes Awareness Month, which is recognized to offer resources and highlight the effects of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
Type 1 diabetes is characterized as the lack of insulin production, while type 2 diabetes, which accounts for 90-95 percent of all diabetes cases, is caused by the body’s ineffective use of insulin.
Dr. Colin Washington, MD/MPH, likened diabetes to a marathon over a sprint.
“Once on this journey, it is important to remember that lifestyle changes do not need to occur overnight, but we must continue to focus on ever-improving behaviors,” said Washington, an Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine at Emory University.
The National Diabetes Statistics Report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2020 states that 32.4 million Americans, including children, have diabetes. African American adults are 60 percent more likely than Caucasian adults to be diagnosed with diabetes.
According to the World Health Organization, diabetes is a significant cause of kidney failure, blindness, heart attacks, strokes, and limb amputation.
“We must look [within the community] to learn how to manage our risk until a solution is found,” said Washington.
One necessity during this tempting holiday is having a support system of loved ones and medical practitioners.
“It is important to maintain a healthy sphere of influence around those with diabetes to allow for the best opportunity for their diabetes care to be a success,” said Washington. “It is also important for those caring [for others] with diabetes to remain in close contact with their healthcare providers.”
Several factors, including obesity, hypertension, high cholesterol, and cigarette smoking, contribute to the overwhelming diagnosis of African Americans. This Thanksgiving, consider a vegetable medley instead of mashed potatoes or substituting fat-free broth for butter.
“As access to healthy foods becomes more difficult, we must continue to rely on our community to provide the tools to try [to] minimize the risk of developing diabetes,” said Washington.
Dr. Washington insists everyone remember that there is no hiatus for diabetes during the holiday season.
“Thanksgiving is a time for many to come together over a wonderful meal and celebrate all that we are grateful for,” Washington said. “But during this time, we must also remain grateful for our health and continue to do everything we can to preserve it.”
The following ten celebrities live with and advocate for diabetes:
(Photo:Getty Images)
While promoting her new film “Bruised” with Variety, Berry shared her concern of living through the pandemic with type 2 diabetes. The 55-year-old actress acknowledges she is at risk but practices social distancing and thoroughly cleanses items brought into her home. Majority of those items aid in her ketogenic diet. “Being diabetic for most of my life, I have always had to take food very seriously,” Berry said on Instagram. “The keto lifestyle offers so many benefits such as weight loss, appetite control, more energy and better mental performance. If you’re like me, you can possibly reverse type 2 diabetes, you’ll experience better physical endurance, better skin and also less acne if that’s an issue. It even helps control migraines!” Berry was diagnosed at age 19.
(Photo: Getty Images)
Daytime Emmy winner and actress, Sherri Shepherd, credits her son, Jeffrey Jr., and her diabetic diagnoses as her inspirations to pursue a healthier lifestyle, according to PEOPLE Health. Shepherd, 54, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2007. The diagnosis changed her life, but she believes it was for the best. She has since educated herself on the illness, and its connection to nutrition and fitness resulting in her extreme weight loss. In 2013, the former The View co-host published a New York Times Bestseller, “Plan D: How to Lose Weight and Beat Diabetes (Even if You Don’t Have It),” emphasizing a program she created with her doctor to assist those who desire a healthier life.
(Photo: Getty Images)
Patti LaBelle introduced her line of desserts over five years ago despite being a type 2 diabetic. LaBelle learned of her diagnosis after the beloved soul singer and actress collapsed while on stage in 1995. According to Diabetes Digest, LaBelle’s blood glucose was 600 mg. In a recent livestreamin collaboration with The Hill, the cookbook author proposed that underserved communities receive more access to diabetic resources. After her unexpected diagnosis she now encourages her fans to visit their doctors regularly. Although her mother died from complications with diabetes, LaBelle admittedly told Diabetes Digest, “I’m one of those Black women who just doesn’t go to see doctors. Had I not passed out, I would have never suspected that I had diabetes.”
(Photo: Getty Images)
Award-winning actor, Anthony Anderson, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2002 at age 31. Anderson partnered with pharmaceutical company, Novo Nordisk, to create the “Get Real About Diabetes”awareness campaign. As part of his efforts to bring awareness to the disease, the comedian shared his diagnosis with his character, Andre Johnson, on Black-ish. In a Q&A with Get Real About Diabetes, Anderson assured that his fame does not guarantee him an easier life with diabetes. “Truth is, there’s no secret to managing diabetes, it just takes commitment and resolve every day,” said Anderson. “Changing what food you eat, consistently being active, and taking an injectable medicine may seem a bit daunting at first, but just give it a shot, pun intended. It all gets so much easier over time, as it all turns to habit.”
(Photo: Getty Images)
The comedic icon, Tracy Morgan, 53, has been vocal about his medical history and his mismanagement of his diabetes. Morgan was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 1996. His excessive use of alcohol and diabetes complications led to a kidney transplant in 2010 while being a series regular on 30 Rock. After an amputation scare from a doctor, he began taking his illness more seriously, Morgan told TIMES magazine. Morgan proudly displayed his Dexcom Continuous Glucose Monitor on the 2015 Emmy’s red carpet.
(Photo: Getty Images)
Vanessa Williams has many titles. The actress, singer, fashion designer, and former Miss America prevailed despite her type 1 diagnosis. Williams credits her mother for her healthy lifestyle. As a child, Williams’ mother lived an active lifestyle and fed her family fresh produce. Despite her mother’s teachings, Williams indulges in many snacks. She shared her almost daily favorites of ice cream, Skinny Pop popcorn, kale salad, and Coco-Magic Bars with SHAPE. However, Williams has enjoyed exercising since an early age. “I really enjoy moving my body, whether it’s Tae Bo, going to a salsa club, or doing weight training with a trainer,” Williams said to WebMD.
(Photo: Getty Images)
After his diagnosis in 2003, Randy Jackson completely turned his life around losing 114 pounds. The 65-year-old discovered his type 2 diagnosis after his blood sugar levels were abnormal, according to Woman’s World. Jackson attributes his weight loss to his gastric bypass surgery in 2003 and incorporating fitness and a healthy diet into his routine. The Grammy-winning musician and television personality authored two “Body with Soul” books to encourage healthy transformations by highlighting ways to prevent hypertension and diabetes. Also, Jackson partnered with nutritionists to form Unify Health Labs, which produces holistic dietary supplements to “help you live the healthiest, happiest life possible.”
(Photo: Getty Images)
Like many, James Earl Jones, the distinct voice of Mufasa in Lion King and Darth Vader in Star Wars, discovered he was a type 2 diabetic by accident. After starting a new workout regimen and diet, Jones fell asleep on the gymnasium bench. His doctor informed him that this behavior was unusual. Jones told Good Housekeeping, “[The diagnosis] hit me like a thunderbolt.” That was over 20 years ago. The now 90-year-old icon has since partnered with Invokana, a prescription medicine for adults with type 2 diabetes to lower blood sugar and reduce the risk of kidney disease and cardiovascular events. Along with medicine, Jones attributes his health over the years to his supporting family, a balanced diet and fitness regime, and maintaining his mental health.
(Photo: Getty Images)
Gabourey Sidibe, 38, the breakout actress was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and decided weight loss surgery would ease her fears. “I truly didn’t want to worry about all the effects that go along with diabetes,” Sidibe said in an exclusive interview with PEOPLE. “I genuinely [would] worry all the time about losing my toes.” Her laparoscopic bariatric surgery in 2016 was only the beginning of her new lifestyle. Sidibe has since transformed her health by working with a nutritionist and hired a personal trainer. The NAACP Image Award winner openly speaks about her diagnosis in her memoir, “This is Just My Face: Try Not to Stare,”which received high praise from Roxane Gay and the New York Times.
(Photo: Damon Dash)
Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes as a teen, Damon “Dame” Dash, 50, is now the ambassador for Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin. The entrepreneur is the self-proclaimed “OG of Diabetes” because when he began taking insulin a syringe was involved, he shared in an interview with Essence. His journey with diabetes led him to launch the Dame Diabetes Network in 2017. The platform consists of videos that highlight diabetic friendly recipes, wellness tips, and include interviews and discussions with doctors and his peers. “Diabetes is not a weakness,” Dash said in a video detailing his history with diabetes. “It’s a place to showcase your strength.”
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How I Used The Apple Watch To Get In Shape – HODINKEE

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Columns
A Week On The Wrist
Hands-On
The Value Proposition
In-Depth
Reference Points
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My First Watch
To Be Precise
Watch 101
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A. Lange & Söhne
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Armin Strom
Audemars Piguet
Baume & Mercier
Bell & Ross
Blancpain
Bovet
Breguet
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Bremont
Bulgari
Bulova
Carl F. Bucherer
Cartier
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Chopard
Chronoswiss
Citizen
Fortis
F.P.Journe
Frederique Constant
Girard-Perregaux
Glashütte Original
Grand Seiko
G-Shock
Hamilton
Harry Winston
Hermès
H. Moser
Hublot
HYT
IWC
Jaeger-LeCoultre
Jaquet Droz
Laurent Ferrier
Longines
MB&F
Mido
Montblanc
NOMOS Glashütte
Norqain
Omega
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Panerai
Parmigiani Fleurier
Patek Philippe
Piaget
Rado
Ressence
Roger Dubuis
Rolex
Seiko
Swatch
TAG Heuer
Tiffany & Co.
Tissot
Tudor
Ulysse Nardin
Urwerk
Vacheron Constantin
Van Cleef & Arpels
Zenith
Introducing The New Ming 37.05 Wants You To Have A Date With The Moon
Watching Movies Steve Martin Wears A Gold Piaget and John Candy Wears a Casio in ‘Planes, Trains & Automobiles’
Hey, HODINKEE! Why The Sun Set On Bumper Automatics, Where Tudor Might Go Next, And What It Might Be Like To Be The Big Cheese At A Big Brand
Editors’ Picks
Editors’ Picks The Biggest Watch Surprises of 2021 (So Far)
In-Depth I’ve Changed My Mind About The Seiko SPB153
In House This Lucky Man Buys Thousands of Watches For a Living
I started out skeptical of Cupertino’s smartwatch. But a renewed focus on fitness convinced me to give it another shot.
In Watch of the Week, we invite HODINKEE staffers and friends to explain why they love a certain piece. This week’s columnist is a tech reporter for Consumer Reports.
One hundred and ninety-five pounds?!? What the heck!
It was the morning of December 30, 2017, and I was standing on a scale at a blood donation center on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, embarrassed by the number staring back at me. It was my second time there in as many months. The first time, in mid-October, was to donate blood for the sole purpose of finding out my blood type in order to wrap up my Colombian citizenship application process.
It turned out that my blood type, A positive, was in short supply, and the blood-donation center wanted to know if I’d be interested in donating again – platelets this time. “Sure,” I said on the phone when they called. “I can do that.”
Now, 195 pounds might not be so bad if you’re a 6’4” natural heavyweight cutting to make light heavyweight the week before a five-round title fight. I, however, am 5’9” and write about laptops for a living, and the closest I get to escaping a mount is resizing images of MacBooks and Dell Inspirons in Photoshop.
I use that morning where I saw 195 on the scale as a sort of dividing line between when I looked at my weight as a sort of “Eh, it is what it is” (that type of resignation sets in when you consider Peanut M&Ms a basic food group) to, “Uh, yeah, I have to do something.” And what I did was dust off my Apple Watch, hop on my bike, and ride around New York City like a maniac.
My relationship with the Apple Watch before deciding to do something about my weight can best be described as polite ambivalence.
I’m a tech reporter by trade, and I remember watching the livestream of the initial Apple Watch presentation in September 2014 (which, thanks to YouTube, can still be seen in its entirety) and thinking to myself, “Ehhh.”
At the time, I hadn’t consistently worn a watch since high school (a humble Skagen) and wouldn’t have known the difference between a chronograph and chronometer if my life depended on it. And the idea of having my wrist buzzzz every time I got a Slack notification made my skin crawl. (Still does, actually.) Besides, I’m in front of a computer all day, and my iPhone, tragically, is never more than four inches away at any given time. Why would I need a watch?
Fast forward a few years and The House That Steve Jobs Built began to narrow the focus of the Apple Watch from an amorphous “computer on your wrist” to “a very fancy FitBit, designed by Apple in California.” This I could get into, especially since it coincided with me getting into cycling, in part to lessen my reliance on the then-crumbling subway.
To me, the key insight delivered by the Apple Watch is how much effort it takes to burn a calorie. Ten minutes on the bike and you’re lucky to burn 100 calories. Go all-out for 30 minutes, absolutely kill yourself, and maybe you’ll crack 300 calories. Cool.
I started looking at every snack food in terms of minutes on the bike and it helped me actually think about what I was eating. Armed with this new framework I declared war on my belly.
Looking back, it’s sorta funny how quickly I went from being an Apple Watch skeptic to being an Apple Watch stan. While fitness tracking was the reason I gave the Apple Watch a second chance in the early part of 2018, it was the Apple Watch Series 4, which was released that fall, where Apple really sealed the deal for me. This version of the watch was two millimeters smaller than the Series 3/2/1, which made it more comfortable to wear on my 6.5-inch wrist. It was faster and the battery lasted longer. Couple that with my discovery that you could buy straps from Amazon that were nearly as good as the official Apple ones for like $10 and I was hooked.
Maybe I didn’t need my wrist to vibrate every time I got an Instagram like (he writes as if he gets many of those), but I certainly didn’t mind the steady stream of soccer news alerts provided by apps like BBC Sport and Spain’s Marca. A quick flick of the wrist would tell me if that incoming WhatsApp message could safely be ignored or needed to be answered immediately. And while on the bike, I could get used to easily skipping Spotify songs or flicking through my Overcast (a power user’s podcast app) cycling playlist.
That it’s an almost impossibly accurate watch was pretty cool, too.
And the way I see it, the Infograph Modular face (along with its predecessor, which was called Modular) was designed with a certain type of person in mind, someone whose skin itches whenever they see unused white space on a webpage and who demands total information density at all times. C’est moi.
Infograph Modular is a digital dial with room for up to six complications, not counting the time itself. I laid mine out like this: The day and date in the top right corner (which, when tapped, would open my calendar app); the five-day forecast via the premium weather app Carrot (which, when tapped, would open the full Carrot app); remaining battery life in the bottom left; my Activity rings in the bottom center; the humidity in the bottom right corner (this would also open Carrot when tapped). New York melts into a fetid swamp in the summertime, but it’s always nice to know exactly how sweaty you’ll get today before you head out the door.
In the top left corner I kept the Exercise app, which I’d tap whenever I hopped on the bike.
It should also be noted that the Apple Watch eventually opened my eyes to “real” watches, planting the idea in my brain that these things exist and that They Are Neat. I remember watching the opening episodes of the Amazon adaptation of The Man in the High Castle in the fall of 2018 and noticing the character Joe Blake wearing a type of watch I had never seen before. (Not that I knew anything about watches at the time, but still.) A few minutes later, Google turned up that he was wearing something called a “Flieger.” File -> New Tab, www.amazon.com -> “Flieger watch.” Two days later I became the proud owner of a Citizen Eco-Drive Flieger, which I still own.
My collection would eventually grow beyond this Citizen, though that didn’t happen until about a year later when I began researching affordable watches at the prodding of the author John Biggs, who was my first boss and remains a dear friend. The first automatic in my collection? That would be the Seiko SRPD87, which I bought from a nearby jewelry store roughly 14 seconds after reading James Stacey’s review for HODINKEE.
Now? Well, I’ve made the same mistake that many watch folks make when they first get into the hobby and now have a drawer filled with around a dozen $200 to $300 watches. I’ve got Orients, Timexes, Islanders, a handful of AliExpress-style “homages,” and, of course, an absolute ton of Seikos. If I’m honest, I probably have too many watches right now and am hoping to whittle down my collection next summer with the hopes of buying a shiny new Doxa Sub 300T.
The signs that you’re on the right track don’t manifest overnight, but instead drip via a series of entries in the Health app. That, and your pants begin to fit again.
As a lifelong nerd, the need to quantify and reduce basically everything to numbers has always made sense to me, a sort of generalized “pics or it didn’t happen” to guide you through life. The Apple Watch unlocks this, enabling you to track in real time the number of calories you burn per workout. In my case, the Apple Watch would also keep track of how long (in minutes) I biked, how many miles I covered, my cycling speed, any elevation gained (minimal, given this is New York City we’re talking about), and my heart rate.
Typically, I’d bike 30 minutes in the morning to work, those same 30 minutes coming home to Queens, and as many as three hours on Saturday or Sunday, zooming around Central Park or up and down the Hudson River Waterfront Greenway with a single AirPod in my right ear, almost certainly playing the video game podcast Retronauts.
Once home, I’d step on my WiFi-connected scale, which would then sync my weight and body fat percentage to my iPhone. This obsessive data-tracking worked well for me. I weighed 138 right as the pandemic set in during the spring of 2020, a year that just about sapped my will to do much beyond work, watch YouTube, and play very old video games.
Now, I ate my fair share of junk throughout 2020 but have recently gotten back into my cycling (and tracking) routine again, spurred on by the hope that the worst was behind us.
Nicholas De Leon is a longtime technology reporter living in New York whose hobbies (besides watches!) include watching soccer and playing old video games.
The HODINKEE Shop is an authorized retailer of Apple Watches; explore the collection here.
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