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A Diabetes-Friendly Holiday Cooking Guide – Everyday Health

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Holiday cooking is stressful enough — add in the challenge of cooking for guests with various eating preferences and dietary needs, and the idea of crafting the perfect holiday meal can seem impossible. This may feel especially true if one of your guests has been diagnosed with a health condition such as type 2 diabetes, which requires diligent meal planning. The good news: It doesn't have to be.
Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which the body can’t effectively use the hormone insulin to transport blood sugar (glucose) to cells and muscles for energy. This phenomenon, known as insulin resistance, causes glucose to pile up in the blood at unhealthy levels, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).
Of the more than 34 million Americans with diabetes (about 1 in 10), about 90 to 95 percent have type 2 diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). That means there’s a good chance at least one person at your holiday table has to pay close attention to the food they eat.
Making healthy food choices is one of the best ways that people with type 2 diabetes can keep their blood sugar levels under control, helping them avoid diabetes-related complications like nerve, kidney, and heart damage, according to the Mayo Clinic.
As the host, you can help any friends and family members with type 2 diabetes stay on track with their diabetes diet and still satisfy other guests with the holiday dishes they love.

How? By using this guide to cooking for someone with type 2 diabetes during the holidays. Read on for expert tips, key ingredients to use (and avoid), diabetes meal planning resources, and recipes to get you started.
RELATED: 9 Diabetes-Friendly Swaps for Your Holiday Cooking
Contrary to popular belief, there is no single diabetes diet. People may follow any number of eating patterns to manage diabetes, including a Mediterranean diet, a low-carbohydrate diet, and a plant-based eating approach such as a vegetarian diet, according to a nutrition consensus report from the American Diabetes Association (ADA).
The key is to include plenty of nonstarchy vegetables (such as broccoli, cucumbers, leafy greens such as kale, mushrooms, beets, Brussels sprouts, and carrots), minimize added sugars and refined grains, and opt for minimally processed foods whenever possible, the ADA reports. Lean protein (like chicken, turkey, fish, eggstofu, and beans), nonfat or lowfat dairy, and healthy fat sources (including fish, avocados, nuts and seeds, and olive oil) are also staples of a diabetes-friendly diet, per recommendations from the NIDDK.
In fact, a healthy diabetes diet is the ideal diet for everyone, “but because someone may have diabetes, the focus becomes that much more important as it helps them to manage their blood sugar levels,” says Amy Kimberlain, RDN, CDCES, a national spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics based in Miami.
RELATED: The Best and Worst Foods to Eat in a Type 2 Diabetes Diet
Stock up on these diabetes-friendly ingredients when planning your holiday meals.
“My top piece of advice is to balance your table by adding more veggie dishes,” says Toby Smithson, RD, CDCES, the Hilton Head, South Carolina–based author of Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies.
Dishes that feature nonstarchy vegetables in particular (asparagus, beans, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cucumber, peppers, salad greens) are your best bet. People with type 2 diabetes can typically eat as many nonstarchy vegetables as they wish, because these veggies are low in both calories and carbohydratesnotes the ADA. Just be sure if you’re using frozen or canned varieties to opt for ones with no added salt.
The quality and quantity of carbs consumed has a direct effect on blood sugar levels, Kimberlain says. Therefore, it’s vital to stock your holiday table with the healthiest carb options possible.
Healthy carb options to choose include starchy fruits and vegetables like applesblueberriessweet potatoes, corn, pumpkin, and black beans, according to the ADA. Foods made from whole grains (like brown rice, whole-wheat bread, and whole-grain pasta) are also solid bets.
These foods are generally rich in fiber, which helps boost satiety, improve digestion, and manage blood sugar, notes the ADA.
Carbs and sugar aren’t the only thing people with type 2 diabetes need to keep an eye on — choosing lean protein sources is also important. Lean protein foods like fish, skinless chicken and turkey, eggs, beans and lentils, as well as soy (such as tempeh and tofu) are typically low in saturated fat. And tamping down on saturated fat is vital for lowering the risk of heart diseaseaccording to the American Heart Association (AHA).
This matters for people with diabetes because they are twice as likely to develop heart disease or stroke as someone without diabetes, as the CDC notes.
When eaten in moderation, healthier fat sources like avocado, olive oil, and nuts and seeds can help guests with type 2 diabetes lower their risk of heart disease. These foods offer monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats, which have been shown to reduce LDL ("bad") cholesterol, an important marker for heart health, according to the ADA.
RELATED: 8 Ways to Manage Type 2 Diabetes and Heart Health
Steer clear of these ingredients when making a diabetes-friendly meal. Many can even be substituted with healthier options that don’t skimp on flavor.
Recipes that use simple carbohydrate ingredients (read: added sugar) like honey, sweet glazes, or icing can spike blood sugar levels in small portions, Smithson says.
Granted, some recipes may need some sugar to taste palatable. Cranberry sauce, for example, needs sugar to offset the tartness of the fruit. And yet you can probably cut at least half the amount of sugar the recipe calls for, Smithson says. You can make up for the loss of sweetness by adding in ingredients like vanilla, cinnamon, and orange.
Or consider using alternative sweeteners that are diabetes-friendly. Erythritol, for example, is a sugar alcohol that may not impact blood sugar levels, notes the Diabetes Food Hub, which the ADA runs. Just be sure to not overdo it on these sweeteners, as they may cause gas, bloating, and stomachache.
As previously mentioned, meats high in saturated fat can spell trouble for heart health — especially for people with type 2 diabetes.
But the sodium content in many processed meats is also cause for concern. Even if you choose a lean protein like chicken or turkey, it may still pack loads of hidden salt. Regularly consuming high amounts of sodium can lead to high blood pressure or hypertension, which is a major risk factor for heart diseaseaccording to the AHA.
For that reason, the AHA recommends checking for sodium on meat labels: Your best bet will be meats with 100 milligrams (mg) of sodium or less in 4 ounces.
The wrong dip or dressing can wreck an otherwise healthy vegetable platter by adding extra calories and saturated fat. Thanks to additives like cream and whole milk, 2 tablespoons of veggie dip can pack 120 calories and 11 grams (g) of fat (2.5 g from saturated fat), per the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).
For this reason, Smithson prefers using Greek yogurt to create homemade veggie dips and dressings — 2 tablespoons of nonfat plain provides less than 20 calories and less than 1 g of fat, per the USDA. You can also look for Greek yogurt in store-bought dips and dressings. Oftentimes, guests don’t even notice the switch.
RELATED: 20 Easy and Quick Snack Ideas for People With Type 2 Diabetes
If you’re still at a loss as to how to create a tasty, diabetes-friendly dish for your table, try one (or more) of the following recipes that are perfect on a holiday menu. These crowd-pleasers get the thumbs-up from diabetes experts.
This recipe from Downshiftology offers a delicious way to add more veggies to your holiday plate, Smithson notes. What’s more, Brussels sprouts are a nonstarchy vegetable, which is one food group the ADA encourages people with diabetes to eat aplenty. Nonstarchy veggies are chock-full of vitamins and minerals yet low in calories. Plus, the recipe couldn’t be more straightforward: Simply toss sliced Brussels sprouts in olive or avocado oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast in the oven. You’ll end up with a crunchy, healthy side dish.
Nutrition per serving (serves 6): 90 calories, 5 g total fat (1 g saturated fat), 4 g protein, 10 g carbohydrates, 4 g fiber, 2 g sugar, 28 mg sodium.
Get the recipe.
While this recipe from Well Plated includes two carb-heavy ingredients (butternut squash and maple syrup), it balances the scale with low- and no-carb ingredients (olive oil, almond milk, Parmesan cheese, fresh herbs, and spices). The result: a diabetes-friendly dish that contains 17 g of carbs per serving, Smithson says.
Nutrition per serving (serves 6): 109 calories, 5 g total fat (1 g saturated fat), 1 g protein, 17 g carbohydrates, 3 g fiber, 5 g sugar, 407 mg sodium.
Get the recipe.
What are the holidays without pie? With this recipe by Amy’s Healthy Baking, your guests can enjoy the traditional flavor of pumpkin pie, without the hefty dose of calories, sugar, and fat typically found in the treat. Plus, it’s a good source of fiber with over 3 g per serving. “Including higher-fiber foods with your meals will help blunt spikes in blood sugar,” Smithson says.
Nutrition per serving (serves 10): 135 calories, 4.6 g total fat (2.6 g saturated fat), 4.3 g protein, 19.6 g carbohydrates, 3.4 g fiber, 7.6 g sugar, 189.7 mg sodium.
Get the recipe.
This healthier version of a holiday classic from Wholesome Yum offers plenty of flavor without loads of added sugar. It contains only four ingredients: cranberries, water, erythritol, and orange zest. “This recipe can fit into the holiday meal for a person with diabetes as long as the full 6 g of carbohydrate is calculated into the whole meal,” Smithson says.
Nutrition per serving (serves 6): 32 calories, 0 g total fat (0 g saturated fat), 0 g protein, 6 g carbohydrates, 2 g fiber, 2 g sugar.
Get the recipe.
Kimberlain offers up this recipe as a way of enjoying a flavorful potato dish — minus the standard heaping serving of butter. “I used a little butter in the recipe, but in all honesty, many recipes use double to triple the amount,” she notes. “Any time you’re able to cut back on the amount added in is of benefit.”
Nutrition per serving (serves 8): 164 calories, 5.5 g total fat (2.4 g saturated fat), 5.5 g protein, 24.2 g carbohydrates, 3.6 g fiber, 3.2 g sugar, 110.1 mg sodium.
Get the recipe.
RELATED: 10 Surprising Foods That Have Little Impact on Blood Sugar
Check out these books, blogs, and websites if you could use more diabetes nutrition tips and tricks.
The ADA is one of the leading diabetes education organizations in the nation. It is a top choice for finding healthy diabetes recipes, nutrition information, and meal prep advice.
Smithson’s book offers tons of diabetes-friendly recipes and information on customizing meals. She breaks down what fits into a healthy diabetes eating plan, gives shopping tips, and suggests how to eat healthy away from home.
You’ll find a wealth of information about diabetes nutrition on the CDC’s website. This government agency offers tips related to meal planning, grocery shopping, reading food labels, counting carbs, and more.
Kimberlain’s blog is a valuable resource for people with type 2 diabetes. She publishes crowd-friendly diabetes recipes, along with nutrition-focused articles to help people navigate life with type 2 diabetes.
Run by the ADA, Diabetes Food Hub provides a wide variety of recipes (organized in categories such as lower carb, snacks, Mediterranean, and budget-friendly), grocery lists, meal plans, and informational articles.
RELATED: The Best and Worst Candy for People With Type 2 Diabetes
Preparing a holiday meal that’s both crowd-friendly and suitable for people with type 2 diabetes doesn’t have to be complicated. Make healthy foods like nonstarchy vegetables, whole grains, healthy fats, and lean protein the stars of every dish.
And if you swap unhealthy ingredients with smart, tasty choices, you may just offer your other guests without diabetes some health perks. Making switches can go unnoticed, Smithson says, adding that “this can help lower the added sugar, sodium, and saturated fat — three areas everyone can benefit from.”
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12 New Probiotic-Rich Products Guaranteed To Bring Harmony to Your Gut Microbiome – Well+Good

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Allie Flinn
But with so many options, it can be difficult to figure out which gut health foods are actually worth shelling out for. To get insight into the gut-healthiness of 12 new foods and beverages, we tapped registered dietitian Tracy Lockwood Beckerman, RD, the host of Well+Good’s You Versus Food series. A word to the wise before we jump in: Be careful not to use any of these products as a cure for digestive issues rather than seeing an actual doctor, and consult with an RD or MD before trying any new form of gut-boosting food or beverage. “Some products claim to have gut-healing superpowers, so be weary if you are really trying to heal a GI condition with these without doing some research and talking to your doctor,” Lockwood-Beckerman cautions.
Ready to get gut-friendly? Read the RD’s thoughts and shop the microbiome-boosting products below.

GoodBelly To Go Fast Melts — $20.00

These are basically the probiotic version of pixie sticks—only with zero sugar and plenty of gut-boosting potential. Lockwood-Beckerman says these are a smart addition for people on-the-go. “These also helpful because GoodBelly added two scientifically-backed strains that help to reduce the severity of cold symptoms, which is especially key during travel,” says Lockwood-Beckerman. “That definitely can’t hurt!”

Olipop (12 Pack) — $36.00

This better-for-you soda brand recently added a new flavor, Classic Grape, to its lineup of flavors like Vintage Cola, Orange Squeeze, and Classic Root Beer. “Olipop is made with no artificial sweeteners and contains unique roots and botanicals that give this drink a whopping nine grams of fiber per can. Those nutritionals are pretty impressive,” Lockwood-Beckerman says.

Wildwonder Sparkling Prebiotic + Probiotic Water (12 Pack) — $42.00

“With plenty of fiber and immune enhancing ingredients like turmeric, elderberry, and ginger, Wildwonder has a unique combo of both beneficial prebiotics and probiotics. It also has functional herbs and real fruit, hammering home its holistic angle,” Lockwood-Beckerman says.

Poppi Sparking Prebiotic Soda (12 Pack) — $30.00

“Touted for its prebiotic powers, Poppi has made a splash in the good-for-you beverage world. It contains the ever-popular apple cider vinegar, which does contain healthy prebiotics, but the verdict is still out for its so-called ‘healing’ properties when it comes to cholesterol or metabolism management,” Lockwood-Beckerman explains. This writer is personally a fan of the Strawberry Lemon flavor.

Chi Kitchen Napa Kimchi — $10.00

“This delicious kimchi is fermented, which means it harbors gut-supporting probiotics such as lactic acid. Chi’s kimchi is also free of preservatives and focuses on the nature of eating more cabbage and wholesome vegetables, which is something we can all stand behind,” Lockwood-Beckerman says. Chi also offers a vegan version, along with fermented sesame slaw and kimchi pickles.

SMPL Immunity Bar (12 Pack) — $24.00

“Another vehicle to get in your daily dose of probiotics, this bar gets you 1 billion CFUs per bar. Its ingredients are pretty simple—clearly stated by the product’s name, SMPL—with almonds, quinoa and flax meal being its primary make up,” Lockwood-Beckerman says. “SMPL’s super berry bars are doubly functional because they contains 100 percent of your vitamin C requirements from the addition of acerola cherries.”

Lifeway Cultured Oat — $6.00

The newest addition to Lifeway’s gut-friendly offerings is dairy-free and available in a plain flavor, as well as flavors like blueberry maple oat and berries and cream oat. “Serving up both dairy-free and gluten-free oats and ten live and active vegan cultures, this alt milk is as functional as it gets. Plus, with a pretty short and simple ingredient list, it’s bound to be a household favorite,” Lockwood-Beckerman says.

Lavva Dairy-Free Yogurt — $3.00

“Cornering the market as one of the lowest sugar yogurts thanks to the use of the pili nut, this yogurt also contains both pre and probiotics,” Lockwood-Beckerman says. 50 billion strains at that. “Without any added sugar, gums, added flavors, or dairy, it’s a great gut-friendly food for those following a vegan or plant-based diet. You may want to add some fruit or flavorful spices to make it an even more scrumptious situation for your tastebuds.”

DAH! Yogurt Smoothie (6 Pack) — $65.00

“Slow-cultured yogurt is busting into the yogurt scene, and I’m here for it,” Lockwood-Beckerman says. “The slower processing yogurt lends itself to a naturally more nutritious option with a higher probiotic count and lower sugar. There’s a variety of yogurts and yogurt-based smoothies to choose from depending on your dietary needs like lassi, almond, and dahi yogurt. For context, their oat, almond, and coconut blended yogurt contains 50 billion probiotics per serving and one can of prebiotic soda typically contains just 1 billion probiotics per can.”

Dalci Dark Chocolate Brownies (6 Pack) — $19.00

“This is a ‘better for you’ brownie whose mission isn’t meant to be a health booster or a healing food, but rather a treat that happens to be more natural and holistic than its traditional counterparts,” Lockwood-Beckerman says. “It contains pretty wholesome ingredients—like avocado oil and almond flour—so it can be enjoyed by those looking for anti-inflammatory ingredients.” In addition to brownies, they also offer an Almond Butter Dark Chocolate Blondie, Apple Spice Blondie, and Lemon Coconut Blondie.

Health-Ade Pop (4 Pack) — $8.00

You’re probably familiar with the Health-Ade’s probiotic-rich kombucha, but if you’re looking for something a little different, check out their probiotic sodas. “These cans are packing both the fizz and the function thanks to the prebiotics. Why not reap some gut-balancing health benefits while sipping this organic, gluten-free, and vegan bubbly?” Lockwood-Beckerman says.

AYO Almond Yogurt — $2.00

“This vegan, plant-based, and dairy-free yogurt is all about the almond. From the growth and picking of the almond to the churning and cultivating of the the yogurt, this company puts all its pride and focus into maintaining its four generation family-run almond farm,” Lockwood-Beckerman says. It’s also packed with probiotics and contains six grams of heart-healthy fiber per serving.

 

These are basically the probiotic version of pixie sticks—only with zero sugar and plenty of gut-boosting potential. Lockwood-Beckerman says these are a smart addition for people on-the-go. “These also helpful because GoodBelly added two scientifically-backed strains that help to reduce the severity of cold symptoms, which is especially key during travel,” says Lockwood-Beckerman. “That definitely can’t hurt!”
This better-for-you soda brand recently added a new flavor, Classic Grape, to its lineup of flavors like Vintage Cola, Orange Squeeze, and Classic Root Beer. “Olipop is made with no artificial sweeteners and contains unique roots and botanicals that give this drink a whopping nine grams of fiber per can. Those nutritionals are pretty impressive,” Lockwood-Beckerman says.
“With plenty of fiber and immune enhancing ingredients like turmeric, elderberry, and ginger, Wildwonder has a unique combo of both beneficial prebiotics and probiotics. It also has functional herbs and real fruit, hammering home its holistic angle,” Lockwood-Beckerman says.
“Touted for its prebiotic powers, Poppi has made a splash in the good-for-you beverage world. It contains the ever-popular apple cider vinegar, which does contain healthy prebiotics, but the verdict is still out for its so-called ‘healing’ properties when it comes to cholesterol or metabolism management,” Lockwood-Beckerman explains. This writer is personally a fan of the Strawberry Lemon flavor.
“This delicious kimchi is fermented, which means it harbors gut-supporting probiotics such as lactic acid. Chi’s kimchi is also free of preservatives and focuses on the nature of eating more cabbage and wholesome vegetables, which is something we can all stand behind,” Lockwood-Beckerman says. Chi also offers a vegan version, along with fermented sesame slaw and kimchi pickles.
“Another vehicle to get in your daily dose of probiotics, this bar gets you 1 billion CFUs per bar. Its ingredients are pretty simple—clearly stated by the product’s name, SMPL—with almonds, quinoa and flax meal being its primary make up,” Lockwood-Beckerman says. “SMPL’s super berry bars are doubly functional because they contains 100 percent of your vitamin C requirements from the addition of acerola cherries.”
The newest addition to Lifeway’s gut-friendly offerings is dairy-free and available in a plain flavor, as well as flavors like blueberry maple oat and berries and cream oat. “Serving up both dairy-free and gluten-free oats and ten live and active vegan cultures, this alt milk is as functional as it gets. Plus, with a pretty short and simple ingredient list, it’s bound to be a household favorite,” Lockwood-Beckerman says.
“Cornering the market as one of the lowest sugar yogurts thanks to the use of the pili nut, this yogurt also contains both pre and probiotics,” Lockwood-Beckerman says. 50 billion strains at that. “Without any added sugar, gums, added flavors, or dairy, it’s a great gut-friendly food for those following a vegan or plant-based diet. You may want to add some fruit or flavorful spices to make it an even more scrumptious situation for your tastebuds.”
“Slow-cultured yogurt is busting into the yogurt scene, and I’m here for it,” Lockwood-Beckerman says. “The slower processing yogurt lends itself to a naturally more nutritious option with a higher probiotic count and lower sugar. There’s a variety of yogurts and yogurt-based smoothies to choose from depending on your dietary needs like lassi, almond, and dahi yogurt. For context, their oat, almond, and coconut blended yogurt contains 50 billion probiotics per serving and one can of prebiotic soda typically contains just 1 billion probiotics per can.”
“This is a ‘better for you’ brownie whose mission isn’t meant to be a health booster or a healing food, but rather a treat that happens to be more natural and holistic than its traditional counterparts,” Lockwood-Beckerman says. “It contains pretty wholesome ingredients—like avocado oil and almond flour—so it can be enjoyed by those looking for anti-inflammatory ingredients.” In addition to brownies, they also offer an Almond Butter Dark Chocolate Blondie, Apple Spice Blondie, and Lemon Coconut Blondie.
You’re probably familiar with the Health-Ade’s probiotic-rich kombucha, but if you’re looking for something a little different, check out their probiotic sodas. “These cans are packing both the fizz and the function thanks to the prebiotics. Why not reap some gut-balancing health benefits while sipping this organic, gluten-free, and vegan bubbly?” Lockwood-Beckerman says.
“This vegan, plant-based, and dairy-free yogurt is all about the almond. From the growth and picking of the almond to the churning and cultivating of the the yogurt, this company puts all its pride and focus into maintaining its four generation family-run almond farm,” Lockwood-Beckerman says. It’s also packed with probiotics and contains six grams of heart-healthy fiber per serving.
 
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How Fitness Might Help You Live Longer – Southlake Style

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January 18, 2022
11:29 PM
Exercise is more important than weight loss for improving the prospects of a longer life, according to “The New York Times.” 
In their most recent episode, “Strength Changes Everything” podcast co-hosts Brian Cygan and Amy Hudson discuss the research findings found in Gretchen Reynolds’ article, “Why Exercise Is More Important For A Longer Life.” 
Gretchen says research shows that exercising matters more statistically than losing weight for a person’s longevity. Losing weight is hard, that’s why it has to be combined with nutritional changes and exercise that maximizes muscle health. The research looked at overweight and obese individuals with health problems and found that people who exercise saw great results, regardless of whether or not they lost weight. 
Brian emphasizes that a higher level of fitness is more important to longevity than weight loss. Cutting calories without strength training is one of the worst ways to lose weight. Activity alone has its limitations related to weight loss and increasing longevity. Meanwhile, intentional exercise with the goal to improve muscle quality is one of the best predictors of mortality. Exercise and muscle mass alone doesn’t increase your longevity, but they are correlated to the physiological effects that do such as blood pressure, cholesterol and insulin resistance. 
Being fit at any weight is far more important than the numbers on the scale. Learn more by listening to the “Strength Changes Everything” podcast episode No. 56.  
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Hurricanes hold first offseason workout with new staff – 247Sports

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The Mario Cristobal-led Miami Hurricanes went back to work on Tuesday.
After the team reported on Monday, they participated in their first day of the offseason strength and conditioning practices engineered by Aaron Feld, who arrives with Cristobal from Oregon.
“Aaron is more than just a difference maker as a strength and conditioning coach,” Cristobal said. “He is a game-changer in terms of fostering team culture, instilling discipline and building the DNA of a championship football program.”
The team was broken down into groups with each group going for about 90 minutes with the focus being on “the little details” according to a source.
The strength and conditioning program will continue five times a week over the next two months.
Feld is the Hurricanes’ head strength and conditioning coach after serving in a corresponding role at Oregon the previous four years.
“You don’t move across the country for just any school or just any coach,” Feld said. “That’s the biggest thing. If the ‘U’ wasn’t what the ‘U’ is and if coach Cristobal isn’t who he is, this wouldn’t be happening. I know it’s a place where we can build a perennial contender. You go from good to great, great to elite, and elite to unbreakable–-that’s the culture we’ve developed over the last four years. We had the same ideas coming in, but we’ve watched it evolve into a process that has not only proven effective, but reproducible.”
Feld is joined on the Miami staff from Oregon by Jeff Eaton, an assistant strength and conditioning coordinator.
“Jeff Eaton is my right hand,” Feld said. “Before he’s a great strength coach, he is a phenomenal human being. He is one of the top-level, highest moral fiber, highest DNA quality of a human being I’ve ever been around. That’s before you even consider the fact that he’s one of the best strength coaches I’ve ever worked with. He looks the part, he walks the walk, he talks the talk, and he’s everything you’d want in one of your assistants.”
Tuesday also marked the first day of the spring semester. Early enrollees have until Jan. 26 to register for classes.
“Excitement is an understatement,” Eaton said. “I get goosebumps when I think about it. I know the caliber of man that coach Cristobal is and I know the caliber of man coach Feld is and I’m just so happy to be a part of it. To be considered in that regard, to be alongside these guys, it’s a tremendous feeling and I’m super humbled and super grateful that they would bring me along so we can continue to build this up.”
The start date for spring practices have not been announced, but are expected to begin in March with the annual spring game in April.
Miami is coming off a 7-5 season. It is slated to open its 2022 campaign on Sept. 3 against Bethune-Cookman with a full schedule expected to be released later this month.
“Every single year is a new team and every single year is a new challenge,” Feld said. “You don’t go hoping to build something in five years. It starts right now.”
Christopher Stock has covered the Miami Hurricanes since 2003 and can be reached by e-mail at stock@insidetheu.com and on Twitter @InsideTheU.
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