Connect with us

Health and Lifestyle

Build a fitness routine with these simple 5 steps – TODAY – Today.com

Published

on

Sections
Shows
More
Follow today
More Brands
If you haven’t exercised in awhile or find yourself skipping planned workouts — it’s time to rethink your fitness routine. Figuring out a workout schedule can be daunting, especially since it’s not one-size-fits-all.
The most effective schedule for one person may not necessarily work for another. The types of workouts you do, time of day you exercise and days of the week you decide to work out are all personal choices.
But to get started, there are some guidelines to follow to help you prevent injury and see results.
In general, working out 4-5 days a week for about 30 minutes is a standard recommendation that I give to my private clients — whether they are trying to lose weight or not. Many people are surprised to hear that just because you want to lose weight doesn’t necessarily mean you need to exercise more than someone looking to maintain their weight and health.
The other 2-3 days a week are rest days. Keep in mind that “rest” doesn’t need to mean inactivity. These days can include walks, gentle stretching and even meditation.
Exercise days can be done consecutively or spread throughout the week. Follow these guidelines when scheduling your workouts:
With these general guidelines in mind, remember that the most effective workout routine is one you can commit to. Follow these steps to determine a workout schedule that works for you!
First, spend time thinking about the types of workouts you like to do. It’s helpful to have a roster of workouts that you enjoy. In my first session with any client, I ask them about activities they’ve done in the past — even dance lessons as a kid or riding a bike when they were a teenager. If you currently work out, what are the activities that you enjoy doing? If it’s something from childhood, how can we replicate that as an adult? For example, if you liked dancing we can find free dance workouts on YouTube. If you enjoyed riding your bike, we can do spin classes at the gym or a recumbent bike in your home.
It’s also helpful to write out why you enjoy certain workouts. How do they make you feel? Connecting positive emotions to the physical movement will strengthen your desire to stay committed to the workout.
Now that you have your list of activities, it’s time to start scheduling them into your week. As a personal trainer, many people are shocked to find out that if the only time I could exercise was early morning, I would never do it! I am not a morning person, so I strategically plan my workouts for late morning or early afternoon. Some of my clients are the opposite, they are morning people and if they don’t fit it in before 8 a.m., it’s hanging over their head for the rest of the day.
So what time of day are you most likely to follow through with a workout? If you are not a morning person (like me!) then saying you’re going to wake up early to exercise is just setting yourself up for failure (or at best, a miserable experience). Instead of creating an aspirational fitness routine, I encourage my clients to be realistic and look at their schedule as it is and then plug in a workout at a time that works with their current lifestyle. That may mean using your lunch break to get a workout in or doing it right after work before you tend to other obligations.
Timing your workout around meals or snacks is another helpful way to figure out what works best for your schedule. If you have a set lunch at noon, you’ll want to work out 1 to 3 hours after eating a normal-sized meal. If you tend to eat breakfast later in the morning, an earlier workout may make sense and you can refuel afterwards with your morning meal. Or, if you always have an afternoon snack, you’ll want to exercise about 1 hour after having your snack. You can use your meal or snack times to figure out when makes most sense to fit a workout into your schedule.
It’s not necessary to plan an additional meal or snack just because you worked out. Instead, use your existing eating schedule to inform your workouts and capitalize on the energy from the nutritious meals you’re already eating.
Are you more likely to exercise on the weekend or during the week? Do longer cardio or strength training sessions when you have more time, and be strategic about which workouts you do on which days. If you’ve only got enough time in your schedule for a quick 15-minute workout during the week, committing to doing longer workouts on Saturday and Sunday may work best for you. If you’re more likely to get your workout done during the structured workweek, then save your rest days for the weekend.
I enjoy weekend workouts because I have more time and can do more activities, like a strength-training workout earlier in the day and then getting outside for a walk or run on the treadmill later. I can go at a more leisurely pace and try new things because I have more free time. But if you’re someone who thrives off of the regimented schedule of the workweek and your weekend is more of a free for all, my system wouldn’t work for you. Take inventory of your time and your moods and then schedule your workouts accordingly.
Now that you have all of the information you need to create a routine that works with your interests and lifestyle, it’s time to get it down on paper. Planning your workouts in your calendar helps for a number of reasons. You see your workout every single time you look at your calendar, so subconsciously it becomes a part of your everyday life. Plus, if you have to reschedule your workout, you physically have to adjust it in your calendar, meaning that mentally you’ll be taking a pause and really thinking about when you can get it done. If it’s not on your calendar, then technically it doesn’t exist on your schedule! So make it an appointment and think about it like a doctor’s appointment: Difficult to cancel, but if you do then you need to reschedule it.
If there’s a change in environment or schedule, like when you’re on vacation or have a lot going on during the holidays, revisit these steps and shift your workout schedule so that it fits with your day-to-day life, regardless what that looks like.
Stephanie Mansour is contributing health and fitness writer for TODAY. She is a certified personal trainer, yoga and Pilates instructor and weight-loss coach for women. She hosts “Step It Up with Steph” on PBS. Join her complimentary health and weight-loss challenge, and follow her on Instagram for daily inspiration.
© 2021 NBC UNIVERSAL

source

Continue Reading
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Health and Lifestyle

5 New Vendors to Know About at This Summer's 626 Night Market – Eater LA

Published

on

Filed under:
After missing all of 2020, SGV’s popular food event comes back with new street food picks
626 Night Market is finally making its return for a ninth season at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia after the pandemic put events on hold for the past year. The popular food event typically takes place 10 times from May to September and attracts up to 100,000 people each weekend. Although 626 Night Market has made a name for itself as an must-stop in SGV with more than 250 food, merchandise, and craft vendors, it’s also solidified itself as an incubator for highlighting upcoming culinary talent.
Many food operations that had humble beginnings at 626 Night Market have gone on to open their own permanent restaurants. “Those with less capital can test the waters here before trying to open a brick and mortar. Those that do well here can grow their fan base and go on to be very successful,” says Annika Yip, 626 Night Market Marketing Coordinator.
Some of the most successful 626 Night Market alumni include siblings Philip and Carol Kwan, who made their stand Mama Musubi a household name throughout LA farmers markets and at Smorgasburg. The Kwans also opened at Kitchen United in Pasadena, a cloud kitchen that allows customers to order meals from many of LA’s most popular restaurants. Philip Kwan went on to create many other successful food ventures such as Mission Control, Twisted Tiki, Mcfadden Public Market, and Amazebowls. The creator of the viral Ramen Burger, Keizo Shimamoto, took part in 626 Night Markets and opened in New York and LA’s Smorgasburg. Shimamoto later opened a Ramen Burger restaurant in Los Angeles’s Koreatown and a ramen restaurant in New York that closed last year. He is currently awaiting the opening of his new restaurant, Ramen Shack, in San Juan Capistrano, slated to open later this summer.
Other 626 Night Market vendors that have gone on to open physical locations include: Jichan’s Onigiri-ya, Milk Tea Company, Takoyaki Tanota, Drunken Cake Pops, Cafe 949, Main Squeeze, Sushi with Attitude, to name a few. Although new vendors are being added constantly, here are five new vendors to keep an eye on at this year’s 626 Night Market.
Move over kombucha, there’s a new fermented drink in town. Kefir drinks are currently all the rage in Asia and Kefir Mix owner Quyna Nguyen is the first to bring the Asian flavored kefir drinks to California. The drinks are popular in Asia for being a healthier alternative to boba drinks. Kefir is a healthy, fermented food with a consistency comparable to yogurt, and research shows it could help boost immunity, aid in digestive problems, and control blood sugar, among many other health benefits.
Cultured and fermented using kefir grains, the drink has been consumed around the world for centuries. As a result of the fermentation, very little lactose remains in kefir. All the kefir is freshly made daily and served with purple rice, mango, strawberry, and even Oreo. Nguyen opened her store in Santa Ana in May 2021, and will be at 626 Night Market this summer.
WezzArepas brings traditional Colombian street food to the 626 Night Market. The stand is a new twist on the classic Columbian dish made using ground maize dough. Arepas are typically served with accompaniments such as cheese, meats, and avocado. While traditional arepas use white corn, WezzArepas uses a yellow, sweet corn cake with a mozzarella cheese center stuffing. There’s also the option of adding jalapeño or pepperoni to the arepas. In addition, the stand serves Columbian-style hot dogs cooked with shredded mozzarella cheese and bacon, then topped with three kinds of sauces: creamy cilantro aioli, pink, and pineapple sauces. Each hot dog is then topped off with potato chip bits for a crunch.
Vegano by Stick Station specializes in quality vegan popsicles designed for those with lactose intolerance and casein protein-related allergies in mind. The creamy popsicles flavors are made with rice milk which in turn produces a creamy tasting flavor using less than half the sugar other popsicles use on the market. Flavors include: cafe choco chip, matcha, rocky road, coconut, mango chili, mojito, and strawberry lemon. This will be Vegano by Stick Station’s first foray into the 626 Night Market. It operates at Hermosa Beach, South Pasadena, Playa Vista, Long Beach, Mar Vista, and Torrance Farmers Markets.
Mason’s Den will be serving up the TikTok-famous mini pancake cereal. The pandemic has led to some interesting cooking trends like sourdough bread, Dalgona Coffee, and feta pasta, but people on TikTok have made a bowl of mini pancakes covered in syrup and milk that you eat with a spoon into a viral sensation. Customers can choose between original and matcha pancake dough before rummaging through the number of potential toppings, including sour gummy worms, Fruity Pebbles, Teddy Grahams, Oreo crumbs, strawberries, blueberries, and maple/caramel/chocolate syrups, among a plethora of other cereal and breakfast toppings. In addition to the viral mini pancakes, Mason’s Den will also serve funnel cakes, corn, and other fried fair food. Owner Jerman Arteaga has already been booked for next year’s Coachella and Stagecoach festivals.
Sandoitchi is a Texas-based Japanese sando restaurant that will travel into 626 Night Market debut this year. Japanese sandos aremade on thick, fluffy milk bread aka shokupan. Sandoitchi, which is Japanese for sandwich, serves versions with egg salad, pork katsu, hot chicken katsu, and fruit with cream. The sandos are known for selling out within minutes in Texas and at all the various pop up locations. Chef Stevie Nguyen gained social media fame with a ridiculous $75 wagyu sando topped with black truffles and gold leaf in the past.
The first 626 Night Market of the year will be July 9 to 11, followed by July 16 to 18, August 27 to 29, and September 3 to 5 with hours from 4 p.m. to midnight on Friday and Saturday and until 11 p.m. on Sunday.
Sign up for our newsletter.
Check your inbox for a welcome email.

Sign up for our newsletter.
Check your inbox for a welcome email.
Filed under:
Filed under:
Check your inbox for a welcome email.

source

Continue Reading

Health and Lifestyle

Smoothie Operator: Independent Blender Bringing Healthy Food To The Streets – BayStateBanner

Published

on

Hyde Park couple ready to buy historic building
Tanisha Sullivan announces bid for secretary of state
Rollins takes reins at U.S. attorney office
Hyde Park couple ready to buy historic building
Tanisha Sullivan announces bid for secretary of state
Rollins takes reins at U.S. attorney office
window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; function gtag(){dataLayer.push(arguments);} gtag(‘js’, new Date()); gtag(‘config’, ‘UA-160618588-3’);

NEW ORLEANS — Good food and music are staples of New Orleans, Louisiana.
Unfortunately, that food usually comes in the form of seafood, gumbo, jambalaya, king cake and beignets — items that make your taste buds happy and your waistline expand.
However, 5th Ward native Domonique “Dinero” Meyers offers a delicious alternative to the city’s famous, but sometimes greasy fare. His Ascent Blends brand of organic smoothies had a modest start on the sidewalks of New Orleans, just a blender and organic fruits.
His efforts at healthy living didn’t go unnoticed — he recently secured a distribution deal with Rouses Markets that will soon see his smoothies and ginger shots on its store shelves. (Rouses started in Houma, Louisiana, more than 40 years ago and is one of the largest independent grocers in the U.S.)
Meyers — who prefers to go by Dinero — understands that health is wealth and hopes his Ascent Blends will create a healthier city. He recently talked with Zenger News about the success of his company, how the Rouses deal came to fruition and much more.
Percy Crawford interviewed Domonique “Dinero” Meyers for Zenger News.
 
Zenger: Tell us about the name of your company and the mission behind it. 
Dinero: It’s Ascent Blends; everything is handcrafted, made fresh daily. We’re your jump-start to becoming healthier. We are community-driven, and we care about your health.
Zenger: From what I understand, you were making smoothies in the hood and that turned into something big. How did it get started?
 
Dinero: Being mindful of my diet over the years, I started this company in July 2016. So, five years ago, I was riding on a pink scooter in my neighborhood, the 5th Ward. And I see a building that used to fix motorbikes and scooters for lease. I said: “This could be a smoothie business right here.”
I reached out, talked to the owner and the numbers were good. But I really wasn’t ready to start a business there. I had never even made a smoothie to sell. The idea just kind of sparked. I worked at a nonprofit, so I asked a few people there what I should do. They said: “Well, if you can’t get the building, just get started by setting up a stand at the barbershop in the neighborhood.” And that’s what I did.
They also told me to get quality ingredients. I wanted to make sure my smoothies are healthy. I wound up using non-dairy agave, which is better than sugar.
I started selling smoothies at the barbershop. They were an instant hit. I was out there 24/7, all over the city. I would have the entire sidewalk lined up with people wanting smoothies, which weren’t available anywhere else. We didn’t have any healthy options there — the 5th Ward is crammed with liquor stores and fried foods.
I was working out every day on the sidewalk, people were joining in with me, and I also started running and doing 5K runs. We are definitely about health education and informing all of our customers, leaving them with literature and inspiration on changing their lifestyle. It’s much more than just a smoothie.
Zenger: Was it hard to get these healthy smoothies to take off in a city not known for having healthy dining options? 
Dinero: it was a bit challenging, but it wasn’t hard. About three or four years ago, things were shifting in the city. You started seeing some healthier options come around. I think that I had a lot to do with people being able to have access to that kind of product. It helps that my smoothies really taste good. I’ve had people looking at my green smoothie like:“Man, that thing probably tastes nasty.” Keep in mind, I’m dealing with the hood, so it was straight like that. It was: “Ugh, I don’t want that green one, give me the pink one.” But then they would taste the green one and find out it’s amazing.
I actually shook the culture from understanding that looks can be deceiving when it comes to things like a healthy smoothie. You have to give things a try.
Zenger: How did the deal with Rouses come about? 
Dinero: One of my homies had a meeting with Rouses about figuring out how to do something together. He brought in a few people who had businesses already, from the farmers to people who cooked to products. He said he wanted to do a vendor market every week or something like that at Rouses. So, I took the meeting. I’m community-based, and there were a lot of things at stake, as far as them righting their wrongs. So, if they were willing to do the undoing, I’m with it.
That was my whole pitch in the meeting. This is not just about me. It’s about creating opportunities for jobs. It was a decision I had to make for myself and others. We are about four or five months in now, and every Saturday, we do the market at Rouses on Tchoupitoulas. And very soon, they will have my fresh-pressed juices and ginger shots on the shelf in their CBD [Central Business District] location.
(Edited by Matthew B. Hall and Fern Siegel)
window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({ mode: ‘thumbnails-a’, container: ‘taboola-below-article-thumbnails’, placement: ‘Below Article Thumbnails’, target_type: ‘mix’ }); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({flush: true});


The post Smoothie Operator: Independent Blender Bringing Healthy Food To The Streets appeared first on Zenger News.

source

Continue Reading

Health and Lifestyle

What to eat while recovering from Covid – The Week

Published

on

What to eat while recovering from Covid  The Week
source

Continue Reading

Trending