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Equal Play: Transgender Athletes Talk Fitness & Fairness – Men's health UK

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For trans men, the chance to participate in sport and exercise can be critical for mental wellbeing. We asked six of them to share their stories
On 2 August 2021, New Zealander Laurel Hubbard stepped up to compete in the women’s +87kg weightlifting event in Tokyo. At 43, Hubbard was the oldest weightlifter in the competition and regarded as a medal contender. Notably, Hubbard was also the first openly transgender athlete to compete at the Olympic Games.
Hubbard fell short of Olympic success after dropping a barbell loaded first with 120kg, then 125kg on three successive snatch attempts, placing her last in her group. Addressing the world’s media afterwards, she thanked the International Olympic Committee (IOC), praising their ‘commitment to the principles of Olympianism’.
‘They’ve demonstrated, I think, that sport is something all people around the world can do,’ Hubbard said. ‘It’s inclusive, it’s accessible. And I think that’s just really fabulous.’
But Hubbard also acknowledged that her participation had ‘not been entirely without controversy’. The inclusion of trans people in the world of professional sports has a complicated history.
Most arguments centre on guidelines for transgender women (those assigned male at birth) who hope to compete in women’s sports, with a recent review published by the UK sports councils concluding that there are ‘retained differences in strength, stamina and physique’ between trans women and cisgender women, even following the suppression of testosterone.
Transgender men face somewhat fewer regulatory barriers, though professional guidelines differ by sport. Generally, they are barred from competing in the female category once treatment with testosterone begins, and are asked to provide a written declaration of gender identity in order to participate in the male category. But there’s often a stigma to navigate.
There are, of course, differences in male and female sports performance, on average. According to data in the journal Endocrine Reviews, male athletes outperform females in disciplines such as running and swimming by up to 12%, while the Journal Of Applied Physiology concluded that female athletes typically display 40% less upper-body strength and 33% less lower-body strength than their male counterparts.
It is the job of sports regulatory bodies to control for differences by offering trans people clear and realistic guidelines for participation.
Critics of the UK sports councils’ review say it’s harmful to frame the ideas of trans inclusion and ‘fairness’ as conflicting ideals; that there’s limited evidence of trans people excelling in sport disproportionately and more research is needed. Other posited solutions include the introduction of an open gender category in some sports– removing debate about who gets to compete under the banner of ‘man’ or ‘woman’, while making sports inclusive for those who identify as neither.
It’s not a simple issue. The IOC’s medical and scientific director, DrRichard Budgett, conceded that there’s no ‘one size fits all’, because every sport is different. And people are, too.
But while debates over nanomoles of testosterone could be continued ad infinitum, to focus purely on regulatory guidelines is to ignore the role that sports and fitness already play in the daily lives of many trans people –amateur bodybuilders, aspiring boxers, weekend footballers, rugby league players, marathon runners.
The pitch, pool and gym can be an intimidating space for those who still don’t feel able to navigate them safe from judgement. But when fitness is inclusive, it can be transformative for health – both mental and physical.We asked six transgender men with a passion for fitness to share their experiences. Here are their stories.

‘We used to dress up at kindergarten and, being a girl, I was always dressed in skirts and dresses. I used to make a big fuss about it and cry because I didn’t want to wear them. Growing up, we didn’t really have the internet to do any research. But I knew inside that I wasn’t a woman.
‘It wasn’t possible to begin transitioning in Romania. Back then, no one knew about it. So I lived with my dysphoria. I just had to manage it. I didn’t really have to “come out”. It was implied.Because I was dressing like a boy, everyone addressed me as a boy. My parents were supportive, so they never told me not to dress up like a boy. I eventually moved to the UK and started my transition. Even from a young age, I knew I’d get to live my life how I’m meant to, like a man.
‘I’ve always been active. When I was in high school, I used to play basketball for the women’s team. I used to play football, too, but with the boys’ team. When I was playing with the boys, I felt like I was part of it, but when I was playing with the girls it didn’t feel right; I felt out of place.
‘When I started hormone treatments, I gained a lot of weight. I didn’t recognise myself in the mirror. My friend, a PT, made a gym and diet plan for me. It amazed me how much weight I lost in three months. Testosterone helped a lot. My body changed from a female shape to a more masculine one.
‘Having top surgery made a huge difference. I can’t really explain how good it feels, starting from the point where you actually see your chest for the first time. I used to wear a sports bra because my chest was constricting me in sport. The satisfaction of throwing it in the bin was just the most amazing thing.Going to the beach for the first time after top surgery was amazing. I was self-aware because of my scars, but obviously nobody cares. It was wonderful.
‘Playing with the boys, I felt like I was part of it. With the girls, I felt out of place’
‘I tried surfing for the first time this year and loved it.I’d really wanted to try it fora long time, but it wouldn’t have felt comfortable for me to expose my chest before
I had surgery. It probably would have affected my surfing before; now I can stand straighter on the board and keep my balance properly. My posture is getting better because I’m not hunched over trying to hide my chest. I’ve been doing that for 30-odd years.Now when I’m surfing I just get this complete feeling of freedom.’
‘I’m from Philadelphia but live in Scotland. When I was a teenager, we moved out to the country. I got into horseriding because my dad and my grandfather ran a stable. At 12, my dad got me a horse.I had a big gap in riding because of my transition. Then when I became male it helped me come back to that sport as an adult, feeling way better about it.
‘I’ve always known I was male. Ever since I could talk and had a general understanding of the world.As a kid, I was always dressing in boys’ clothes and trying to be perceived male. I would see my dad with his shirt off and take mine off, too. He would be like,“Woah, what are you doing?” It just made sense to me.
‘My family wasn’t open tome being transgender at all. I was 23 when I started transitioning. I spent a longtime in therapy because I was subject to a lot of emotional and physical abuse from my parents growing up. It took a lot of undoing damage for me to realise I could transition.
‘After I transitioned, I used a lot of programmes where you get to work on a ranch in return for food and board.I worked in Arkansas for three months and it was super gender-affirming to be a real-life cowboy.
‘With weightlifting, it was just like, “I’m a man, men lift weights. When can I start?”I wanted to be macho all the way. My weightlifting began when I started transitioning, but there was a lot of fear and lack of self confidence in the gym. It took me a year of parking outside and not going in, then going in at midnight and making sure no one wast here – I was petrified. But now I have a healthy relationship with the gym and I’m so proud of how far I’ve come.
‘Physically, the difference is night and day. I was a scrawny boy feeling my way through becoming male. Now, no one could clock me as trans. I don’t disclose it if
I feel like my safety is in jeopardy. I see it as a teaching point to be around a bunch of dudes, let them be misogynistic and talk crap, then say, “Well, actually, I used to be a woman, so maybe you should reconsider your opinion.” I’ve educated a lot of people that way. You never know what a person has been through, so if you can approach more situations with love and understanding, you’ll probably make more meaningful relationships.
‘It’s a dream come true that I get to lift weights and ranch. I’ve always been like the ultimate manly man, so now it all makes sense.’
‘I used to play football forEssex, but boxing was a passion from when I was a kid. The problem was that I didn’t always look like this. When I was 13 or 14, I would walk past a boxing gym and be desperate to go in. But I would’ve had to fight girls. In my brain I was always a little geezer. I couldn’t fight girls – I didn’t want to hurt them. So I just stayed away, which was sad. Now that I’m boxing, I’m flying; if I’d started then I’d probably be a pro by now.
‘I bit the bullet when I was 15 and went to my local gym. My lifestyle was different when I was younger – I was struggling with my identity and things at home. It was quite traumatic. I didn’t have it in the tank to box properly and suffered with my mental health. I left the gym.
‘I’d been in prison 13 times by the time I was 25. But I turned my life around and now I’m a support worker.
‘I love what the gym does for my mental health. I’d been in there just training on the bag and I thought, “This is my time.” I entered an LGBTQ+ white-collar boxing match to raise funds for the underage LGBTQ+ homeless.
‘I predict that I’m going to have a place in the “normal” boxing world. I really believe that’
‘Kellie Maloney, the boxing promoter [who transitioned in 2014], came in to do a talk.It was inspiring. She took a liking to me and introduced me to Jamie “Rocky” Johnson, who is a trans man but without testosterone. He was a pioneer. He directed me to a north London boxing club and I’ve really developed since then. Now I fight against cis men.
‘In 2023, I’m going to Sydney for the World GayBoxing Championships. It’s my lifelong dream to fight at a proper event. It’s an organisation set up to encourage LGBTQ+ sports across the world. I predict that I’m going to have a place as a boxer in the “normal” boxing world. I really believe that. I’m going to keep going, keep training and encourage others to register and get involved in the sport.’
‘Growing up, I knew I was different, but no one knew what “trans” was back then. It was easier to come out asa lesbian than a trans man.Understandably, I struggled with my mental health.
‘Sport has always been important for me. I started playing football for Hull City ladies when I was nine or 10. It wasn’t for me. I was like a bull in a china shop. I started going to rugby instead and fell in love. I was bigger than the other girls and ended up playing county rugby, then union for a Premiership team. I now play wheelchair rugby league, but prior to that I played 26 years of elite women’s rugby union and rugby league.
‘The whole time I was playing I just wanted to be me. My gender was unspoken for a lot of people, but I got told if I came out publicly I’d lose my sport. I lost my parents young, so I didn’t want to lose something else. Playing sport gave me something to concentrate on. It gave me another family.
‘I actually got outed in the national newspapers four years ago. They incorrectly labelled me a trans woman.One paper said I was the reason why referees were leaving the game and that trans women shouldn’t be able to play sport. I lost a lot of friends. People say I tried to “infiltrate” the women’s teams, but I was there for more than 20 years.
‘People need to stop asking, “Am I allowed?” It should be, “How can we get you involved?”’
‘After I was outed, I was required to apply to my governing bodies in order to continue playing women’s sport. I had to have doctor’s letters signing me off as fit to play. At one match, the opposition lied and said they’d had a letter from the governing body to say I was a danger to women. The referee didn’t know what todo. In the end I was removed from the pitch in front of all my mates. The other team refused to let me in my own changing room and toilets. It was horrendous.
‘I injured my back in 2018. I was playing for Rotherham and took a bad tackle that crushed my spinal cord. It took me six months to try wheelchair rugby. I eventually found Leeds Rhinos. I sent them an email saying, “I’m trans, am I allowed to play?”
I was so scared. People need to stop asking, “Am I allowed?” It should be, “How can we get you involved?”
‘The first time I went, I tried to leave and burst into tears.But I got through. I’ve been playing two and a half years now. I got my first try in theSuper League just before my top surgery. It’s a feeling of coming home, having a team again. Sport is life. Everyone should have the right to play sport as themselves.’
‘I started transitioning at 13, the same time I became aware of bodybuilding. Male and female bodybuilders are both amazing, but I knew thatI was trapped in the wrong body. I would create male characters in my video games and dress “male” as a child.
‘My first job was in a leisure centre, so I was in the gym pretty much every day. I’d see men training and that was my inspiration. Bodybuilding put the idea of the “perfect” masculine body in my mind. It was something I wanted to work towards. Being transgender, that’s a lot harder for me.
‘When I first started bodybuilding, I wasn’t on testosterone so it was hard to put on weight and lose water weight. I was very aware of my breasts and hip fat. Not having the male genetics to be in the top ranking for bodybuilding was quite hard on my body dysmorphia. Testosterone certainly helped.
‘I was very serious about wanting to bodybuild, and I still am. Back then, I had this one guy who was my friend and colleague. He’s older than me, so I look at him like a mentor. He was really supportive. He gave me some ideas about different ways to make my waist look smaller and things like that.
‘Despite that, at the start– and even going into new gyms now – I do suffer with anxiety. I still keep myself to myself and go to quiet, small gyms. Gyms where there are other gay people. In my previous gym, there were other transgender people.I’ve been open with the gyms that I’ve trained at and they have been supportive.
‘I now train by myself and focus on me. I go twice a day – half an hour of cardio in the morning, then work on a major muscle group. I do more cardio in the evening, and another major muscle group. Going to the gym is like therapy. I can go there and take my anger and frustration out. It just picks me up. During lockdown, I fell into depression quite quickly because the gym is pretty much my life.
‘I get quite a few messages on Instagram from people asking for training tips, asking where I had my chest surgery. I’m not a qualified Level 3 personal trainer, so I can’t give any professional advice, but I still try to help out where I can.
‘My goal is to one day compete in bodybuilding. It’s difficult. I haven’t seen any transgender guys on stage in the UK. I’ve seen a couple of guys smashing it in the US who are big inspirations, but I want to compete in the UK and prove to all trans guys that it’s possible.’
‘Before I was openly trans, I was pretty much the only female that competed with males in sport. They used to think I was bossy, but I was just fiercely competitive. I discovered taekwondo at university. Back then, I was “stealth” – pre-hormones and surgery. I was competing against other males, but I was very much under the radar.
‘No one knew that I was trans because I didn’t feel confident to be open. It was2018 when I came out publicly. My taekwondo community accepted it. The only pressure was what I put on myself because I wanted to prove that I was just as capable of winning as anyone else.
‘Our philosophy in the sport is to do with equality – especially gender equality. From a competition aspect, it was daunting. I was up against 6ft 3in cis males and I’m 5ft6in, so they certainly had the weight and reach advantage.From a difficulty point of view, prior to testosterone it was certainly harder to compete. Now I fight cis and trans males.
‘Unfortunately, many trans people find the gym a very intimidating place’
I’m a much better athlete now; testosterone has made me stronger. There’s a huge debate about whether it’s unfair for trans people to compete in professional sports. I competed and won my gold medals a few months into taking testosterone, very early in my transition. So there were no physical attributes that had really developed yet.
‘I think it’s important that there isn’t segregation in sports. I like to create a sense of community. It’s okay to talk about being trans, you don’t have to tread on eggshells if you’re unsure of something. I named my business Stealth Fitness because I was under the radar and now I’m open.
‘When I was stealth at uni, going to the gym massively helped me conquer my gender dysphoria. It was a fundamental part of myself-growth. My training has been a huge factor in my confidence. I know the mental health deterioration that can happen when trans people don’t have a physical outlet. Unfortunately, many of them find the gym a very intimidating place.
‘There’s nothing worse than being stuck by yourself and having your thoughts go over and over in your mind.Self-harm and suicide statistics among transpeople are high. I’m trying to encourage these kids to come out into the world and let them know that it’s okay to feel the way you do. You can be yourself and do something about it, too.’

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5 New Vendors to Know About at This Summer's 626 Night Market – Eater LA

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After missing all of 2020, SGV’s popular food event comes back with new street food picks
626 Night Market is finally making its return for a ninth season at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia after the pandemic put events on hold for the past year. The popular food event typically takes place 10 times from May to September and attracts up to 100,000 people each weekend. Although 626 Night Market has made a name for itself as an must-stop in SGV with more than 250 food, merchandise, and craft vendors, it’s also solidified itself as an incubator for highlighting upcoming culinary talent.
Many food operations that had humble beginnings at 626 Night Market have gone on to open their own permanent restaurants. “Those with less capital can test the waters here before trying to open a brick and mortar. Those that do well here can grow their fan base and go on to be very successful,” says Annika Yip, 626 Night Market Marketing Coordinator.
Some of the most successful 626 Night Market alumni include siblings Philip and Carol Kwan, who made their stand Mama Musubi a household name throughout LA farmers markets and at Smorgasburg. The Kwans also opened at Kitchen United in Pasadena, a cloud kitchen that allows customers to order meals from many of LA’s most popular restaurants. Philip Kwan went on to create many other successful food ventures such as Mission Control, Twisted Tiki, Mcfadden Public Market, and Amazebowls. The creator of the viral Ramen Burger, Keizo Shimamoto, took part in 626 Night Markets and opened in New York and LA’s Smorgasburg. Shimamoto later opened a Ramen Burger restaurant in Los Angeles’s Koreatown and a ramen restaurant in New York that closed last year. He is currently awaiting the opening of his new restaurant, Ramen Shack, in San Juan Capistrano, slated to open later this summer.
Other 626 Night Market vendors that have gone on to open physical locations include: Jichan’s Onigiri-ya, Milk Tea Company, Takoyaki Tanota, Drunken Cake Pops, Cafe 949, Main Squeeze, Sushi with Attitude, to name a few. Although new vendors are being added constantly, here are five new vendors to keep an eye on at this year’s 626 Night Market.
Move over kombucha, there’s a new fermented drink in town. Kefir drinks are currently all the rage in Asia and Kefir Mix owner Quyna Nguyen is the first to bring the Asian flavored kefir drinks to California. The drinks are popular in Asia for being a healthier alternative to boba drinks. Kefir is a healthy, fermented food with a consistency comparable to yogurt, and research shows it could help boost immunity, aid in digestive problems, and control blood sugar, among many other health benefits.
Cultured and fermented using kefir grains, the drink has been consumed around the world for centuries. As a result of the fermentation, very little lactose remains in kefir. All the kefir is freshly made daily and served with purple rice, mango, strawberry, and even Oreo. Nguyen opened her store in Santa Ana in May 2021, and will be at 626 Night Market this summer.
WezzArepas brings traditional Colombian street food to the 626 Night Market. The stand is a new twist on the classic Columbian dish made using ground maize dough. Arepas are typically served with accompaniments such as cheese, meats, and avocado. While traditional arepas use white corn, WezzArepas uses a yellow, sweet corn cake with a mozzarella cheese center stuffing. There’s also the option of adding jalapeño or pepperoni to the arepas. In addition, the stand serves Columbian-style hot dogs cooked with shredded mozzarella cheese and bacon, then topped with three kinds of sauces: creamy cilantro aioli, pink, and pineapple sauces. Each hot dog is then topped off with potato chip bits for a crunch.
Vegano by Stick Station specializes in quality vegan popsicles designed for those with lactose intolerance and casein protein-related allergies in mind. The creamy popsicles flavors are made with rice milk which in turn produces a creamy tasting flavor using less than half the sugar other popsicles use on the market. Flavors include: cafe choco chip, matcha, rocky road, coconut, mango chili, mojito, and strawberry lemon. This will be Vegano by Stick Station’s first foray into the 626 Night Market. It operates at Hermosa Beach, South Pasadena, Playa Vista, Long Beach, Mar Vista, and Torrance Farmers Markets.
Mason’s Den will be serving up the TikTok-famous mini pancake cereal. The pandemic has led to some interesting cooking trends like sourdough bread, Dalgona Coffee, and feta pasta, but people on TikTok have made a bowl of mini pancakes covered in syrup and milk that you eat with a spoon into a viral sensation. Customers can choose between original and matcha pancake dough before rummaging through the number of potential toppings, including sour gummy worms, Fruity Pebbles, Teddy Grahams, Oreo crumbs, strawberries, blueberries, and maple/caramel/chocolate syrups, among a plethora of other cereal and breakfast toppings. In addition to the viral mini pancakes, Mason’s Den will also serve funnel cakes, corn, and other fried fair food. Owner Jerman Arteaga has already been booked for next year’s Coachella and Stagecoach festivals.
Sandoitchi is a Texas-based Japanese sando restaurant that will travel into 626 Night Market debut this year. Japanese sandos aremade on thick, fluffy milk bread aka shokupan. Sandoitchi, which is Japanese for sandwich, serves versions with egg salad, pork katsu, hot chicken katsu, and fruit with cream. The sandos are known for selling out within minutes in Texas and at all the various pop up locations. Chef Stevie Nguyen gained social media fame with a ridiculous $75 wagyu sando topped with black truffles and gold leaf in the past.
The first 626 Night Market of the year will be July 9 to 11, followed by July 16 to 18, August 27 to 29, and September 3 to 5 with hours from 4 p.m. to midnight on Friday and Saturday and until 11 p.m. on Sunday.
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Smoothie Operator: Independent Blender Bringing Healthy Food To The Streets – BayStateBanner

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Hyde Park couple ready to buy historic building
Tanisha Sullivan announces bid for secretary of state
Rollins takes reins at U.S. attorney office
Hyde Park couple ready to buy historic building
Tanisha Sullivan announces bid for secretary of state
Rollins takes reins at U.S. attorney office
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NEW ORLEANS — Good food and music are staples of New Orleans, Louisiana.
Unfortunately, that food usually comes in the form of seafood, gumbo, jambalaya, king cake and beignets — items that make your taste buds happy and your waistline expand.
However, 5th Ward native Domonique “Dinero” Meyers offers a delicious alternative to the city’s famous, but sometimes greasy fare. His Ascent Blends brand of organic smoothies had a modest start on the sidewalks of New Orleans, just a blender and organic fruits.
His efforts at healthy living didn’t go unnoticed — he recently secured a distribution deal with Rouses Markets that will soon see his smoothies and ginger shots on its store shelves. (Rouses started in Houma, Louisiana, more than 40 years ago and is one of the largest independent grocers in the U.S.)
Meyers — who prefers to go by Dinero — understands that health is wealth and hopes his Ascent Blends will create a healthier city. He recently talked with Zenger News about the success of his company, how the Rouses deal came to fruition and much more.
Percy Crawford interviewed Domonique “Dinero” Meyers for Zenger News.
 
Zenger: Tell us about the name of your company and the mission behind it. 
Dinero: It’s Ascent Blends; everything is handcrafted, made fresh daily. We’re your jump-start to becoming healthier. We are community-driven, and we care about your health.
Zenger: From what I understand, you were making smoothies in the hood and that turned into something big. How did it get started?
 
Dinero: Being mindful of my diet over the years, I started this company in July 2016. So, five years ago, I was riding on a pink scooter in my neighborhood, the 5th Ward. And I see a building that used to fix motorbikes and scooters for lease. I said: “This could be a smoothie business right here.”
I reached out, talked to the owner and the numbers were good. But I really wasn’t ready to start a business there. I had never even made a smoothie to sell. The idea just kind of sparked. I worked at a nonprofit, so I asked a few people there what I should do. They said: “Well, if you can’t get the building, just get started by setting up a stand at the barbershop in the neighborhood.” And that’s what I did.
They also told me to get quality ingredients. I wanted to make sure my smoothies are healthy. I wound up using non-dairy agave, which is better than sugar.
I started selling smoothies at the barbershop. They were an instant hit. I was out there 24/7, all over the city. I would have the entire sidewalk lined up with people wanting smoothies, which weren’t available anywhere else. We didn’t have any healthy options there — the 5th Ward is crammed with liquor stores and fried foods.
I was working out every day on the sidewalk, people were joining in with me, and I also started running and doing 5K runs. We are definitely about health education and informing all of our customers, leaving them with literature and inspiration on changing their lifestyle. It’s much more than just a smoothie.
Zenger: Was it hard to get these healthy smoothies to take off in a city not known for having healthy dining options? 
Dinero: it was a bit challenging, but it wasn’t hard. About three or four years ago, things were shifting in the city. You started seeing some healthier options come around. I think that I had a lot to do with people being able to have access to that kind of product. It helps that my smoothies really taste good. I’ve had people looking at my green smoothie like:“Man, that thing probably tastes nasty.” Keep in mind, I’m dealing with the hood, so it was straight like that. It was: “Ugh, I don’t want that green one, give me the pink one.” But then they would taste the green one and find out it’s amazing.
I actually shook the culture from understanding that looks can be deceiving when it comes to things like a healthy smoothie. You have to give things a try.
Zenger: How did the deal with Rouses come about? 
Dinero: One of my homies had a meeting with Rouses about figuring out how to do something together. He brought in a few people who had businesses already, from the farmers to people who cooked to products. He said he wanted to do a vendor market every week or something like that at Rouses. So, I took the meeting. I’m community-based, and there were a lot of things at stake, as far as them righting their wrongs. So, if they were willing to do the undoing, I’m with it.
That was my whole pitch in the meeting. This is not just about me. It’s about creating opportunities for jobs. It was a decision I had to make for myself and others. We are about four or five months in now, and every Saturday, we do the market at Rouses on Tchoupitoulas. And very soon, they will have my fresh-pressed juices and ginger shots on the shelf in their CBD [Central Business District] location.
(Edited by Matthew B. Hall and Fern Siegel)
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What to eat while recovering from Covid – The Week

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What to eat while recovering from Covid  The Week
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