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Short Workouts: 10 Things I Learned After Cutting My Workouts to 10 Minutes a Day – SELF

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I’ll admit it: Up until late last year, I was skeptical of short workouts—I didn’t think a routine that was less than 30 or 45 minutes could be “enough.” Then I stumbled upon a 10-minute glutes-focused barre workout on YouTube.
Before then I’d never done barre in my life. My sweat of choice was a 45-minute flow I’d learned over years of Pilates and yoga classes, or maybe a 30-minute circuit workout with traditional strength-training moves like lunges, squats, push-ups, crunches, and perhaps a plank thrown in for kicks.
The barre class intrigued me. For one thing, I knew a number of my friends enjoyed barre—and it required only a chair, which seemed like an easy place to start. For another, I had noticed my old routine wasn’t really serving me any more: I found it hard to get excited about the same exercises day after day with no teacher to motivate me, and I was too tired from staring at a screen all day to join a virtual class and…stare at a screen for another hour. I was ready to try something new. To my surprise, the exercises were intense in that 10-minute barre class, and I loved how rewarding it felt to be done after such a short time.
I woke up the next day actually excited to pick out a quick workout class to do, and I knew I was hooked on my newfound discovery of short workouts. And it wasn’t just barre. Soon I was googling “10-minute yoga,” “quick Zumba workout,” and even “super-short boxing at home with no equipment.”
My switch to these mini classes couldn’t have come at a better time. Reeling from the stress and exhaustion of nine months of a global pandemic, I hadn’t realized how much my body was craving a break from the same old routines I had been putting it through all these months of quarantine. A short workout felt revolutionary—a way to treat myself with kindness and compassion, while continuing to make moving my body a priority. I decided short workouts were the way of my future. I set a goal for myself: I would exercise every morning for 10 minutes, and for no more than 10 minutes. Then I’d cross that off my list and get on with my day.
Committing to such a short amount of time made getting started a lot less daunting, and I was able to stick with it. I began to notice changes quickly: Just a few weeks into my new practice, I noticed I felt less sluggish during the day, my stress had decreased, and I felt generally happier and less restless. I also noticed I felt stronger—my quads can now hold a wall sit longer than they ever have (and I’ve been trying for so long to hold a decent wall sit), I’m less out of breath, and my legs twitch less during hard yoga poses, which I’ll count as a win. And crucially, I have stopped dreading my workouts.
It’s a huge shift from how I felt before. During this experiment (three months and counting!), I have now come to cherish and look forward to those 10 minutes in the morning. It’s no longer a battle between me and my schedule, trying to block out a huge chunk of time to make enough minutes in the day for a circuit I wasn’t that into anyway. Now it’s my time, a space for me to connect with my body, give it what it needs without asking for anything more, and feel ready for the day ahead.
I’d consider my test run a total win, especially at a time when looking forward to anything is an impossible task of its own. Here’s what I’ve learned.
“When we set the threshold at 30, 60, 90 minutes of movement, it can be overwhelming,” Lauren Leavell, a NASM-certified personal trainer and certified barre instructor in Philadelphia, tells SELF. “People may opt out completely if they cannot meet that ‘requirement.’”
By saying “10 minutes is enough,” you open up more opportunities to get moving. Say, for instance, those days when life gets in the way and you don’t have the time available to devote to your normal workout. You may have been tempted to skip it completely, but by focusing on the 10 minutes you do have, you’ve given your body some time to move instead of none.
Eventually you may use those 10 minutes as a jumping off point to longer workouts—or you may stick with what’s working, Brittany Overstreet, Ph.D., a certified clinical exercise physiologist and assistant professor of kinesiology and applied physiology at the University of Delaware, tells SELF. “Think big picture, as in total volume (minutes) per week, instead of putting so much pressure on yourself in a day-to-day scenario,” she says.
It’s a personal preference, but I love to feel my muscles get really worked up in order to deem an exercise worth going back to again and again. Blame years of Pilates, but it’s easy to start chasing the burn once you’ve experienced the high that comes with it.
I was initially worried this wouldn’t be possible in such a short time, but I’ve learned that short workouts can be just as powerful as longer sets—if not more so. (That first barre class, with its moves like “narrow V” and toe taps, proved that.) With many of these short workouts, you’re encouraged to go hard; some even incorporate high intensity interval training (HIIT) into the mix. With HIIT, you alternate short bursts of max effort with periods of lower activity or recovery. “HIIT is a classic for cardio,” says Leavell. “It will get your heart rate up in a short amount of time.” It is, however, meant to be performed with intentional breaks for maximum efficiency, she says, so be wary of dragging this type of exercise out for longer periods of time, which won’t make it any more efficient (10 minutes is actually ideal here for me!).
In fact, they shouldn’t be. Even if your workouts are short, you still shouldn’t be pushing to your limit every time, and you definitely don’t need to be doing HIIT workouts every day.
One thing I’ve really started to enjoy sometimes is using that whole 10 minutes to focus on just stretching and moving my body, something I now find just as useful as traditional strength training or HIIT. Recovery is key—you can’t go hard all the time.
Leavell recommends a mobility routine, which focuses on things like injury prevention and easing muscle tightness induced by holding static positions (such as working at a computer or watching TV), to help your muscles move through their range of motion. Of course, this isn’t going to elevate your heart rate as much as an actual workout, says Leavell. But the goal is moving your body in a practical way—and recovery and mobility are very, very practical.
As HIIT has grown in popularity, so have the number of studies looking into the health benefits of it, especially when compared to longer, more traditional exercise modalities. And science has been pretty clear that short bursts of intense activity, especially when you’re really working hard, can bring some serious benefits—studies have found it helps with everything from insulin sensitivity to how efficiently you consume oxygen during exercise.
“If you’re stressed about having to get through your exercise routine, the benefits of the exercise are likely lost in the physical and psychological toll of that stress,” says Janell Mensinger, Ph.D., FAED, an associate research professor at Villanova University whose areas of expertise include eating disorders, the impact of weight stigma and chronic stress on health outcomes, and health equity in underrepresented populations.
For me, this was never truer than at the end of last year, just before embarking on my experiment. The combination of winter blues, low energy, and pandemic stress, plus the fact that I don’t enjoy running in the cold and was left with home workouts as my only option, meant that I was only working out because I felt guilty not doing it—not because I was getting any enjoyment from it. I now know it can feel good to move my body, and I don’t feel as stressed in the run-up to it or when I think about how to plan my workouts around my morning routine. Something as simple as shortening their length can do wonders for our ability to embrace workouts: “Just as with any goal-setting practice,” says Dr. Mensinger, the more we simplify our goals, “the easier it is to stop the why-even-try effect from kicking in.” And the easier it gets, in turn, to start enjoying them!
This isn’t to say you absolutely have to look forward to every single workout you plan, but by consistently burning out and only going through the motions, you might be losing out on some of the benefits of all those feel-good workout endorphins flooding your body. Choosing a routine that’s more suited to you and your needs is likely to lessen the stress you might feel around working out.
Before my 10-minute workout experiment, I’d estimate I used to spend half my scheduled workout time procrastinating and not actually moving my body—which in turn prolonged the whole thing and made it even harder to stick to. Staring at the ceiling, spending five minutes changing the music, getting distracted by notifications, even pausing for a snack. I’ve done it all.
But since abandoning longer workouts for shorter sessions, I’ve been more focused and intentional with my exercises. That 10 minutes is enough to do different types of sets and exercises but not enough to procrastinate in between repetitions. I’ve also noticed my form has improved—because I know I won’t have to do any single move for too long, I’m able to give it my all and execute it perfectly.
After trying my first 10-minute barre class, I realized it was the perfect combination of intensity and fun that I’d been looking for. The tiny, dancelike movements introduced me to muscles I didn’t even know I had.
This discovery opened my eyes to a whole new fitness world. My new saying is, “If it’s under or around 10 minutes, I’ll try it.” That has introduced me to variations on my old circuit moves (think burpees, skier abs, jump squats), a 10-minute cardio dance abs workout, running in place (surprisingly hard), and something called the Lazy Girl Workout.
“Adjustments are easiest to make in small increments,” says Dr. Mensinger. So if you are worried about trying something because you think you may not like it, you’d only have 10 minutes—a pretty small time commitment—with it if that turns out to be the case.
“Many different kinds of movement, not just intense workouts, release endorphins,” says Dr. Mensinger, “and that becomes positively reinforcing.” These endorphins, she says, are key to making your habit self-sustaining.
That’s why on some days I’ve spent 10 minutes just dancing around in my living room to a loud pop song. It works me up and it’s fun, which is key. And I think we need all the endorphins we can get these days, don’t you?
Personally,  since I started my new practice, I have never felt more free from the messages of “going hard” and “never quitting” that often populate my Instagram feed. I used to push myself too hard on the treadmill knowing I was well past my threshold after 45 minutes, and I know the pressure to do so originated more from the photos I compared myself with on Instagram than it did a healthy desire to stay active. I hate to admit it, but more than once I’ve tried to outdo someone else’s screenshot of race times or kept going only to post my own brilliant results, and that’s just not the kind of energy we should be bringing to the table.
While I’m not swearing off longer sessions altogether, from now on I intend to be a lot more intentional about their frequency and necessity.
By last summer the sight of my yoga mat propped up in the kitchen started to make me feel sick—it was yet another reminder of things I couldn’t do unless I did them in my house. But if we’ve learned anything at all from the past year, it’s to be kind to ourselves when things don’t go to plan, and to play it by ear when it comes to the routines that shape our lives. That might mean encouraging flexibility, and looking to shorter exercise bouts as a way to squeeze some physical activity in, even if you don’t have time (or mental health space) for a longer workout, says Dr. Overstreet. This mentality took a lot of pressure off planning for longer workouts, and it accounted for the many times I just would not have energy to go through with anything long.
After all, we’ve done our fair share of adjusting since last March, and while it was not under ideal circumstances, we’ve all learned that structuring our lives in a more compassionate, purposeful, and supportive way can pay off.
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5 New Vendors to Know About at This Summer's 626 Night Market – Eater LA

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After missing all of 2020, SGV’s popular food event comes back with new street food picks
626 Night Market is finally making its return for a ninth season at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia after the pandemic put events on hold for the past year. The popular food event typically takes place 10 times from May to September and attracts up to 100,000 people each weekend. Although 626 Night Market has made a name for itself as an must-stop in SGV with more than 250 food, merchandise, and craft vendors, it’s also solidified itself as an incubator for highlighting upcoming culinary talent.
Many food operations that had humble beginnings at 626 Night Market have gone on to open their own permanent restaurants. “Those with less capital can test the waters here before trying to open a brick and mortar. Those that do well here can grow their fan base and go on to be very successful,” says Annika Yip, 626 Night Market Marketing Coordinator.
Some of the most successful 626 Night Market alumni include siblings Philip and Carol Kwan, who made their stand Mama Musubi a household name throughout LA farmers markets and at Smorgasburg. The Kwans also opened at Kitchen United in Pasadena, a cloud kitchen that allows customers to order meals from many of LA’s most popular restaurants. Philip Kwan went on to create many other successful food ventures such as Mission Control, Twisted Tiki, Mcfadden Public Market, and Amazebowls. The creator of the viral Ramen Burger, Keizo Shimamoto, took part in 626 Night Markets and opened in New York and LA’s Smorgasburg. Shimamoto later opened a Ramen Burger restaurant in Los Angeles’s Koreatown and a ramen restaurant in New York that closed last year. He is currently awaiting the opening of his new restaurant, Ramen Shack, in San Juan Capistrano, slated to open later this summer.
Other 626 Night Market vendors that have gone on to open physical locations include: Jichan’s Onigiri-ya, Milk Tea Company, Takoyaki Tanota, Drunken Cake Pops, Cafe 949, Main Squeeze, Sushi with Attitude, to name a few. Although new vendors are being added constantly, here are five new vendors to keep an eye on at this year’s 626 Night Market.
Move over kombucha, there’s a new fermented drink in town. Kefir drinks are currently all the rage in Asia and Kefir Mix owner Quyna Nguyen is the first to bring the Asian flavored kefir drinks to California. The drinks are popular in Asia for being a healthier alternative to boba drinks. Kefir is a healthy, fermented food with a consistency comparable to yogurt, and research shows it could help boost immunity, aid in digestive problems, and control blood sugar, among many other health benefits.
Cultured and fermented using kefir grains, the drink has been consumed around the world for centuries. As a result of the fermentation, very little lactose remains in kefir. All the kefir is freshly made daily and served with purple rice, mango, strawberry, and even Oreo. Nguyen opened her store in Santa Ana in May 2021, and will be at 626 Night Market this summer.
WezzArepas brings traditional Colombian street food to the 626 Night Market. The stand is a new twist on the classic Columbian dish made using ground maize dough. Arepas are typically served with accompaniments such as cheese, meats, and avocado. While traditional arepas use white corn, WezzArepas uses a yellow, sweet corn cake with a mozzarella cheese center stuffing. There’s also the option of adding jalapeño or pepperoni to the arepas. In addition, the stand serves Columbian-style hot dogs cooked with shredded mozzarella cheese and bacon, then topped with three kinds of sauces: creamy cilantro aioli, pink, and pineapple sauces. Each hot dog is then topped off with potato chip bits for a crunch.
Vegano by Stick Station specializes in quality vegan popsicles designed for those with lactose intolerance and casein protein-related allergies in mind. The creamy popsicles flavors are made with rice milk which in turn produces a creamy tasting flavor using less than half the sugar other popsicles use on the market. Flavors include: cafe choco chip, matcha, rocky road, coconut, mango chili, mojito, and strawberry lemon. This will be Vegano by Stick Station’s first foray into the 626 Night Market. It operates at Hermosa Beach, South Pasadena, Playa Vista, Long Beach, Mar Vista, and Torrance Farmers Markets.
Mason’s Den will be serving up the TikTok-famous mini pancake cereal. The pandemic has led to some interesting cooking trends like sourdough bread, Dalgona Coffee, and feta pasta, but people on TikTok have made a bowl of mini pancakes covered in syrup and milk that you eat with a spoon into a viral sensation. Customers can choose between original and matcha pancake dough before rummaging through the number of potential toppings, including sour gummy worms, Fruity Pebbles, Teddy Grahams, Oreo crumbs, strawberries, blueberries, and maple/caramel/chocolate syrups, among a plethora of other cereal and breakfast toppings. In addition to the viral mini pancakes, Mason’s Den will also serve funnel cakes, corn, and other fried fair food. Owner Jerman Arteaga has already been booked for next year’s Coachella and Stagecoach festivals.
Sandoitchi is a Texas-based Japanese sando restaurant that will travel into 626 Night Market debut this year. Japanese sandos aremade on thick, fluffy milk bread aka shokupan. Sandoitchi, which is Japanese for sandwich, serves versions with egg salad, pork katsu, hot chicken katsu, and fruit with cream. The sandos are known for selling out within minutes in Texas and at all the various pop up locations. Chef Stevie Nguyen gained social media fame with a ridiculous $75 wagyu sando topped with black truffles and gold leaf in the past.
The first 626 Night Market of the year will be July 9 to 11, followed by July 16 to 18, August 27 to 29, and September 3 to 5 with hours from 4 p.m. to midnight on Friday and Saturday and until 11 p.m. on Sunday.
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Smoothie Operator: Independent Blender Bringing Healthy Food To The Streets – BayStateBanner

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Hyde Park couple ready to buy historic building
Tanisha Sullivan announces bid for secretary of state
Rollins takes reins at U.S. attorney office
Hyde Park couple ready to buy historic building
Tanisha Sullivan announces bid for secretary of state
Rollins takes reins at U.S. attorney office
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NEW ORLEANS — Good food and music are staples of New Orleans, Louisiana.
Unfortunately, that food usually comes in the form of seafood, gumbo, jambalaya, king cake and beignets — items that make your taste buds happy and your waistline expand.
However, 5th Ward native Domonique “Dinero” Meyers offers a delicious alternative to the city’s famous, but sometimes greasy fare. His Ascent Blends brand of organic smoothies had a modest start on the sidewalks of New Orleans, just a blender and organic fruits.
His efforts at healthy living didn’t go unnoticed — he recently secured a distribution deal with Rouses Markets that will soon see his smoothies and ginger shots on its store shelves. (Rouses started in Houma, Louisiana, more than 40 years ago and is one of the largest independent grocers in the U.S.)
Meyers — who prefers to go by Dinero — understands that health is wealth and hopes his Ascent Blends will create a healthier city. He recently talked with Zenger News about the success of his company, how the Rouses deal came to fruition and much more.
Percy Crawford interviewed Domonique “Dinero” Meyers for Zenger News.
 
Zenger: Tell us about the name of your company and the mission behind it. 
Dinero: It’s Ascent Blends; everything is handcrafted, made fresh daily. We’re your jump-start to becoming healthier. We are community-driven, and we care about your health.
Zenger: From what I understand, you were making smoothies in the hood and that turned into something big. How did it get started?
 
Dinero: Being mindful of my diet over the years, I started this company in July 2016. So, five years ago, I was riding on a pink scooter in my neighborhood, the 5th Ward. And I see a building that used to fix motorbikes and scooters for lease. I said: “This could be a smoothie business right here.”
I reached out, talked to the owner and the numbers were good. But I really wasn’t ready to start a business there. I had never even made a smoothie to sell. The idea just kind of sparked. I worked at a nonprofit, so I asked a few people there what I should do. They said: “Well, if you can’t get the building, just get started by setting up a stand at the barbershop in the neighborhood.” And that’s what I did.
They also told me to get quality ingredients. I wanted to make sure my smoothies are healthy. I wound up using non-dairy agave, which is better than sugar.
I started selling smoothies at the barbershop. They were an instant hit. I was out there 24/7, all over the city. I would have the entire sidewalk lined up with people wanting smoothies, which weren’t available anywhere else. We didn’t have any healthy options there — the 5th Ward is crammed with liquor stores and fried foods.
I was working out every day on the sidewalk, people were joining in with me, and I also started running and doing 5K runs. We are definitely about health education and informing all of our customers, leaving them with literature and inspiration on changing their lifestyle. It’s much more than just a smoothie.
Zenger: Was it hard to get these healthy smoothies to take off in a city not known for having healthy dining options? 
Dinero: it was a bit challenging, but it wasn’t hard. About three or four years ago, things were shifting in the city. You started seeing some healthier options come around. I think that I had a lot to do with people being able to have access to that kind of product. It helps that my smoothies really taste good. I’ve had people looking at my green smoothie like:“Man, that thing probably tastes nasty.” Keep in mind, I’m dealing with the hood, so it was straight like that. It was: “Ugh, I don’t want that green one, give me the pink one.” But then they would taste the green one and find out it’s amazing.
I actually shook the culture from understanding that looks can be deceiving when it comes to things like a healthy smoothie. You have to give things a try.
Zenger: How did the deal with Rouses come about? 
Dinero: One of my homies had a meeting with Rouses about figuring out how to do something together. He brought in a few people who had businesses already, from the farmers to people who cooked to products. He said he wanted to do a vendor market every week or something like that at Rouses. So, I took the meeting. I’m community-based, and there were a lot of things at stake, as far as them righting their wrongs. So, if they were willing to do the undoing, I’m with it.
That was my whole pitch in the meeting. This is not just about me. It’s about creating opportunities for jobs. It was a decision I had to make for myself and others. We are about four or five months in now, and every Saturday, we do the market at Rouses on Tchoupitoulas. And very soon, they will have my fresh-pressed juices and ginger shots on the shelf in their CBD [Central Business District] location.
(Edited by Matthew B. Hall and Fern Siegel)
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The post Smoothie Operator: Independent Blender Bringing Healthy Food To The Streets appeared first on Zenger News.

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What to eat while recovering from Covid – The Week

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What to eat while recovering from Covid  The Week
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