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The Rock's Diet and Workout Plan Is Extreme — What to Know – Healthline

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Though the name likely needs no introduction, Dwayne “the Rock” Johnson is one of Hollywood’s highest paid actors known for his large, strong physique.
Equally as dedicated to his workouts as his career, the Rock is infamous for his demanding workout routines paired with a high calorie diet to meet his energy needs.
If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to exercise and eat like the Rock, this article will tell you more about the food he eats and his workout plan.
The Rock eats a lot of food to sustain his body’s needs. He sticks to a pretty strict diet most days, but he does indulge in his favorite foods from time to time.
Because he’s so active, most days the Rock will eat over 5,000 calories. To put this into perspective, that’s about twice the number of calories recommended for most men his age (1).
He needs this energy to sustain his workouts and continue to build significant muscle mass.
For 6 days a week, the Rock sticks to a very strict diet. He uses his rest day as a day for “cheat meals,” which he believes allows flexibility and prevents him from feeling deprived.
According to his Instagram and online interviews, on an average day, the Rock will eat 5–7 high protein meals, with cod, chicken, steak, eggs, and protein powder as his main protein sources.
He also eats plenty of complex carbohydrates with rice, sweet potato, oatmeal, and baked potatoes being some of his favorite choices.
For fat, he adds lots of healthy fats from peanut butter, eggs, coconut oil, and fish oil supplements.
He adds at least a cup of vegetables to the meal, which provides a good amount of fiber, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.
Aside from cheat days, the Rock limits his intake of foods that are highly processed and high in calories due to their sugar and refined carb contents.
Beyond this, the Rock does not follow a specific restrictive diet that removes any food groups.
Except for his cheat days, the Rock eats a minimally processed, high calorie, and high protein diet that does not restrict any food groups.
For 6 days a week, the Rock follows a strict high protein diet. On Sundays, he lets loose with an “epic” cheat day.
Most days of the week consist of 5–7 meals to fuel his highly active lifestyle.
While each day will vary, the Rock sticks to main staples in his diet, such as lean proteins (cod, steak, chicken, eggs), complex carbs (rice, potatoes, oatmeal), and mixed vegetables.
According to his Instagram, the Rock enjoys a “Power Breakfast” after he finishes his first workout of the day:
The Rock gets a bulk of his calories throughout the day from protein and carbohydrates and a moderate amount of fat. His diet is balanced with lots of vegetables, protein, and complex carbohydrates.
The Rock also sometimes consumes a post-workout smoothie within 10 minutes of finishing his workout.
According to his Instagram, his post-workout smoothie contains:
The Rock allows himself one “epic” cheat day — usually Sunday — to indulge in foods he restricts during the week. He states that cheat days should be as extreme as possible, since they’re “earned.”
These cheat meals can involve various food combinations, such as 12 pancakes with peanut butter and syrup, 3–4 double dough pizzas, a box of donuts, sushi, pasta, bagels, two “Big Daddy” burgers with the works, french fries, and plenty of desserts.
While his cheat meals vary considerably, most of his cheat days likely surpass 5,000–7,000 calories.
On most days, the Rock follows a strict high protein diet that surmounts to over 5,000 calories per day. On his cheat days, he allows himself to eat whatever and however much food he wants.
With the Rock eating over 5,000 calories most days, you may wonder if this is healthy.
Per the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range (AMDR), the average person should consume 45–65% of their total daily calories from carbs, 10–35% from protein, and 20–35% from fat (2).
The Rock’s diet appears to be slightly lower in carbohydrates and fat and higher in protein. He might benefit from including slightly more fats in his diet. However, he may be using healthy fats in his meals (e.g., olive oil) that he inadvertently forgot to mention.
Overall, the Rock eats a nutritious diet full of lean protein, complex carbs, vegetables, and healthy fats. Further, his focus on consuming homemade, minimally processed food keeps his added sugar and sodium intakes low (except for his cheat days).
Based on his personal reports on his social media, the Rock doesn’t appear to eat much fruit and focuses on eating vegetables as his main source of antioxidants.
The average active man needs approximately 2,400 to 3,000 calories per day, most of which should come from minimally processed foods and a balance of protein, fat, and carbs (1).
However, a person’s calorie needs will vary depending on their body size, activity level, medical condition, and personal goals (1).
While it’s unknown how many calories the Rock burns each day, he has substantial muscle mass and a high activity level. His metabolic rate and calorie needs are likely higher than the average male (3, 4, 5).
Plus, he likely has goals to continue to build muscle, which is easier to achieve when in a slight calorie surplus and consuming a very high protein diet (6).
That said, the Rock’s diet is very high in calories and would likely lead to weight gain for the average person who does not have the same muscle mass, metabolism, and activity level as the Rock.
Instead, you’re better off following the general concepts of the Rock’s diet and dialing down the portion sizes and number of meals. For example, aim to eat a balanced diet and have lean protein, complex carbs, and vegetables at each meal.
To achieve muscle hypertrophy (muscle growth), you need to consume adequate protein and incorporate resistance training into your routine (7, 8).
The Rock eats plenty of protein and is likely well above the recommendation of 0.73–0.9 grams per pound (1.6–2.0 grams per kilogram) for building muscle mass (9, 10, 11, 12).
That said, the majority of research suggests exceeding the protein recommendations does not pose any health risks for most people. Though, most research has only investigated doses up to 1.5 grams per pound (3.3 grams per kilogram), which is less than what the Rock consumes (13, 14, 15, 16).
Further, most research supports high protein diets when paired with heavy resistance training to build muscle mass. Though, there’s debate as to whether protein intake exceeding 1 g/lb/d (2.2 g/kg/d) provides any additional muscle gain (17, 18).
You can likely get away with much less protein and still achieve muscle growth. For most people, aiming for 20 to 40 grams of protein per meal is a good goal that’s relatively easy to achieve (19, 20).
The topic of cheat days is fairly controversial.
For some people, cheat days may feel like a chance to indulge in foods that are normally restricted or limited, and they may serve as a form of motivation to eat well throughout the week (21, 22, 23).
The Rock’s cheat day is extremely high in calories that mostly come from high calorie foods and lots of added sugar. However, one day of indulgence is unlikely to lead to dramatic weight gain or negative health effects.
That said, using cheat days isn’t always a good idea, especially if you’re having multiple cheat days a week. Instead, you may want to include some treats throughout the week, so you don’t feel deprived (24, 25).
Further, cheat days aren’t for everyone. If you’re unable to control your food intake on a cheat day, this may be a sign that you’re over-restricting too much during the week. This is especially prevalent in people who follow very low calorie diets on noncheat days (24, 25, 26).
Clearly, the Rock enjoys his cheat day. However, you can still achieve your nutrition and fitness goals by eating foods you enjoy each day — think pancakes and chocolate, along with your salads and whole grains — rather than going to extremes.
While some people enjoy cheat days, and they work for them, it may not be appropriate for people with a negative relationship with food or a history of disordered eating (24, 25, 26).
For the average person, consuming the Rock’s diet would likely lead to weight gain. Instead, it’s best to follow some of the general principles of his diet (high protein and minimally processed) while customizing it to your own needs.
The Rock works out in his personal gym, known as the Iron Paradise. While his workouts vary based on his upcoming movie roles and personal goals, his most popular workout routine is the Hercules workout.
His workouts begin with 30–60 minutes of cardio followed by his first meal, the “Power Breakfast.” After, he spends around 90 minutes doing strength training.
According to the Rock’s social media, the Rock’s workouts are high intensity and involve heavy resistance. Therefore, your exercises should include heavy weights that you can safely use to perform all sets and reps.
That said, it’s important to tailor your workouts to your personal experience, goals, fitness level, and preferences. So you may wish to adjust the number of sets or reps and select exercises that work best for you.
Before starting this exercise program, speak with your healthcare professional or a trainer to figure out how to modify it for you.
The Rock’s Hercules workout involves 6 days of strength training and cardio with a rest day.
The Rock’s diet and exercise program is extreme and likely unsuitable for most people.
First, most people do not need to eat as many calories as the Rock. Instead, it’s best to follow a similar eating style (i.e., a high protein, minimally processed diet) and consume portions that are better suited for you.
His cheat day strategy might also not be a good fit, as you’re likely better off incorporating those foods in your diet every day in smaller amounts rather than denying yourself foods you enjoy all week.
His workouts are high intensity and designed for people who have experience with resistance training. If you’re a beginner, you may want to decrease the intensity (e.g., fewer sets, reps, and weight) and focus on proper form.
You may also want to add another rest day if you find that this program is leaving you excessively sore. Working with a qualified professional can help ensure you’re performing the exercises safely and effectively.
Finally, remember that the Rock’s physique is likely a combination of good genetics, hard work ethic, access to the best food and training equipment, and a team of top nutrition and fitness professionals.
So use his diet and fitness program as a guideline that you can modify to your physique, preferences, budget, and goals.
Leave the Rock’s diet and workout to the Rock, and instead use it as inspiration to suit your own personal calorie needs, preferences, and goals.
Along with great genetics, hard work ethic, and a team of professionals behind him, the Rock’s high protein diet and intense resistance training program help him build tremendous muscle mass.
That said, most people do not need to eat nearly as much food as the Rock does. Instead, it’s best to use his high protein eating style as a guide and tailor it to your calorie needs.
If you’re interested in trying his workouts, remember that the Rock has been training for decades. While you can use his workouts as a guide, be sure to customize it — especially if you’re a beginner — to match your current skill set, strength, and fitness goals.
And remember, the Rock’s results didn’t come overnight. Be patient and adapt your workouts and diet to suit your needs, preferences, and lifestyle.
Last medically reviewed on November 24, 2021








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UF celebrates the construction of a new Student Health Care Center – WCJB

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GAINESVILLE, Fla. (WCJB) – UF Health officials held a beam-signing event today to celebrate the construction of the new Student Health Care Center.
With the current facility being about 100 years old, officials with UF Health, said they’re thrilled to get a new building.
“Our current building was designed for in-patient infirmary, people stayed overnight there, and that’s not the way a modern medical office building for outpatient care is done,” said Dr. Ronald Berry, the Director of the Student Health Care Center.
Now, the new facility is being built with all the same services as the current one, and more.
“The infectious unit here is probably the first of its kind in a student health,” said Berry.
He said they started the design stage of the infectious care unit during the pandemic, giving the work even more meaning.
“You’ll be able to enter into the waiting area to infectious care, from a door at the front of the building that’s not going to the rest of the building,” said Berry.
The air in this unit does not get recirculated, making it one of the safest areas in the building.
UF Health is also implementing programs that promote a healthy lifestyle.
“There’s going to be the inclusion of the demo kitchen where our dietitian can host interactive cooking lessons for students, for faculty, and staff throughout campus,” said Adeel Markatia, an Assistant Director within the cabinet of health affairs in Student Government.
Markatia said the building will also have a sun terrace where students can study, hangout, or just relax.
“Things like that, like these new features, definitely make this building a great enhancement for our campus,” he said.
Berry said with a new facility, he hopes to provide more learning opportunities for medical students.
The construction is expected to be done around this time next year, and open for students in Spring 2023.
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What Causes Narcolepsy? These Factors May Play a Role | Health.com – Health.com

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In many cases, chronic sleepiness is tied to low levels of certain brain chemicals.
When diagnosed with a new condition, the first question is almost always "How?" We naturally want to know exactly what brought us to that moment. This curiosity may be even stronger with something like narcolepsy, a chronic sleep disorder that is both under-recognized and misunderstood, according to the nonprofit Project Sleep.
While scientists have yet to pinpoint the exact cause of narcolepsy, a majority of cases are tied to low levels of a brain chemical involved in regulating our sleep-wake cycle, according to the Cleveland Clinic. And other factors are thought to play a role in triggering the disease process.
Here's how sleep experts explain the causes of narcolepsy.
Before delving into the causes, let's consider what narcolepsy looks like.
Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, hallucinations, sleep paralysis, vivid dreams, and more, says Steven Thau, MD, division chief of the Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine Department and medical director of the Sleep Center at Phelps Hospital/Northwell Health.
It can present at any point in a person's life, but most commonly it initially occurs in a person's teens or 20s, Dr. Thau tells Health.
While each case is different, excessive daytime sleepiness is generally the first symptom to surface. Symptoms such as hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and cataplexy may follow, says Manjamalai Sivaraman, MD, FAASM, a sleep medicine specialist and neurologist at the University of Missouri. The latter may not happen for a few years, if at all. 
RELATED: What Are the Types of Narcolepsy? Sleep Experts Explain the Differing Presentations of This Sleep Disorder
There are two main types of narcolepsy: types 1 and 2. There's also a third known as secondary narcolepsy. (More on that one below.)
Narcolepsy type 1 covers anyone who has low levels of hypocretin (a brain chemical that controls wakefulness) and experiences cataplexy (sudden muscle loss), according to the Mayo Clinic. Type 1 makes up about 70% of narcolepsy cases, says Richard Bogan, MD, a medical officer at SleepMed, Inc. and associate clinical professor at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine and the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.
People with narcolepsy type 2 may experience all the symptoms of narcolepsy except cataplexy—and their symptoms are often less severe, says the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). And their hypocretin levels are usually normal.
While there are no known ways to prevent or cure type 1 or type 2 narcolepsy, NINDS notes that lifestyle changes and medications may be helpful for maintaining alertness and managing other symptoms.
RELATED: Is Narcolepsy Genetic? What Sleep Experts Say About Inheriting This Chronic Disorder
While the science is still evolving, here's what's known so far.
People with type 1 narcolepsy have very low levels of brain chemicals called hypocretins. These chemicals, first discovered in 1998, are important for a couple of reasons, per the Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School. For one thing, they keep people awake and alert. They also prevent people from drifting off into REM (rapid-eye movement) sleep while they're awake.
In people type 1 narcolepsy, however, the nerve cells that produce hypocretins die off, and the resulting dearth of these chemicals leads to sleepiness and poorly regulated REM sleep, per Harvard's Sleep Medicine Division.
Research by two separate investigative teams suggests that type 1 narcolepsy is caused by a severe loss of neurons that produce these chemicals, per a 2015 review in the New England Journal of Medicine.
As for what causes type 2 narcolepsy? It's possible that people who have this form of the disorder may sustain less injury to their neurons than those with type 1, according to that same review, which references a 2009 Sleep study. But data on the disease process involved in type 2 narcolepsy "are quite limited," notes the New England Journal.
Bottom line: Scientists don't fully understand what triggers the loss of hypocretin-producing cells, although it appears that one or more of the following factors may be involved:
Most people with narcolepsy, especially type 1, have a gene variation known as HLA-DQB1*06:02. It is a variation of the HLA-DQB1 gene, which "provides instructions for making part of a protein that plays an important role in the immune system," according the US National Library of Medicine. The risk of narcolepsy associated with this variation and related genes is unclear to researchers at this time.
That same gene variation is found in 50% of people with narcolepsy type 2, but only 12-30% of the general population, according to the New England Journal.
Speaking of risk factors, narcolepsy isn't a disorder that tends to run in the family. According to NINDS, just up to 10% of people with type 1 narcolepsy have a close family member who presents with similar symptoms. If a parent has narcolepsy, the odds of passing it down to a child is only about 1%, says Mayo Clinic.
People with the HLA-DQB1*06:02 gene variation may be at increased risk of developing narcolepsy after being exposed to a trigger, such as an infection, says NINDS. That's based on studies of people after they developed narcolepsy.
Upper airway infections such as streptococcus pyogenes and influenza A (including H1N1) are strongly associated with narcolepsy, per a 2011 study in the Annals of Neurology, especially in cases where it begins in childhood, notes Dr. Sivaraman.
We know that people with narcolepsy type 1 have low hypocretin levels—but why? A leading theory considers narcolepsy to be an autoimmune disorder.
"There are supporting evidences for autoimmune destruction—the immune system in one's body attacking its own healthy cells—of hypocretin neurons in the hypothalamus of the brain," says Dr. Sivaraman. To break it down, if this theory is true, then a person's own immune system is responsible for the brain lacking in hypocretin.
As Dr. Thau puts it, in this case, "the cells that control wakefulness are damaged."
Currently, researchers are working on using immunotherapy to reverse this loss, Dr. Bogan tells Health. According to a 2020 review published in Current Treatment Options in Neurology, small studies have shown an improvement in symptoms for narcolepsy patients after using immunotherapy treatment, especially those who recently presented with the disease. However, the experiments were uncontrolled and did not have clear endpoints, requiring more research to achieve any definitive answer on the treatment's benefits.  
RELATED: 7 Narcolepsy Symptoms to Know, According to Sleep Specialists
Unlike narcolepsy types 1 and 2, doctors do know the "why" behind secondary narcolepsy. This form of narcolepsy occurs when the brain's hypothalamus region gets damaged, according to Harvard's Division of Sleep Medicine.
These people can experience all of the same symptoms as those with types 1 and 2. However, they might also have severe neurological problems and require a large amount of sleep—typically 10 hours or more.
"In rare cases, brain lesions or diseases such as tumors, vascular malformations, strokes or inflammatory diseases of the brain can result in the destruction of the signaling pathways that increase brain activity and promote wakefulness," says Dr. Thau.
According to the National Health Service, secondary narcolepsy causes include:
As Dr. Thau notes, "a healthy lifestyle and avoiding smoking or the use of illicit drugs decrease the risk of some of the disorders that cause secondary narcolepsy."
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Mount Laurel police asks public's help in finding child – Courier Post

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MOUNT LAUREL – Police are asking the public’s help in finding a 6-year-old girl who was allegedly abducted by her non-custodial mother.
The girl, Grace Craytor of Pennsauken, was last seen around 7:10 p.m. Monday with her mother, Kristina Maletteri, at Lifetime Fitness in Mount Laurel, according to township police.
The girl’s father, who has a full custody order for Grace, had invited Maletteri to swim with the child during a supervised visit at the facility at Church and Fellowship roads, said a police account.
 “At some point, Ms. Maletteri is said to have taken her daughter and left the area without consent,” the account said.
Maletteri is known to drive a 2017 silver Audi Q3 with New Jersey license plates “S64MPY.”
The missing child is 46 inches tall, 70 pounds, with blonde hair and hazel eyes, police said.
Anyone with information is asked to call Mount Laurel police at 856-234-8300 or the confidential tip line 856-234-1414, extension 1599.
Tips can also be emailed to Lamaro@mountlaurelpd.org.
Jim Walsh covers public safety, economic development and other beats for the Courier-Post, Burlington County Times and The Daily Journal.
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