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These 10 Foods Are High in Vitamin K – Real Simple

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And there’s a trick to absorbing more vitamin K from what you eat.
When people think of vitamin K, they often relate it to blood clotting—and this is an accurate association because this vitamin is required in the synthesis of several blood proteins involved in clotting, says Nijya Saffo, RD, registered dietitian and owner of NK Fitness and Nutrition, LLC. Besides this, another key role of vitamin K is the activation of proteins needed for bone metabolism (the replenishment of bone tissue). 
Vitamin K is the collective name of a family of compounds. "There are different categories within vitamin K," says Rayanne Nguyen, RD, registered dietitian specializing in sports nutrition. "You have vitamin K1, which is found in dark leafy greens and soybean oil, and also vitamin K2 and some others, which can be found in smaller amounts in animal products." Fermented foods also contain vitamin K2. 
As a fat soluble vitamin, vitamin K from food appears to be absorbed best when there's fat or oil in the same environment. So when you're having your green vegetables, toss it in some oil to increase its absorption.
Your body treats vitamin K like a fat and stores it in your liver and fat tissues. "We can rely on our body stores a little bit more than [we can for] some of our water soluble vitamins," says Nguyen. But at the same time, your body isn't able to make enough vitamin K consistently, and relies on you getting it from your diet.
The Daily Value for vitamin K is 90 micrograms. "If someone has a disease that impacts the gastrointestinal tract, like celiac disease or Crohn's disease, they may not absorb the vitamin K from their food as well," says Nguyen. In these cases, the physician and dietitian would monitor the person's vitamin K levels more regularly and may start them on a supplement. 
There are also people who need to be more mindful about their intake of vitamin K-rich foods. Since vitamin K supports blood clotting, if you are on a medication to prevent clotting, sudden increases in vitamin K intake may interfere with your medication, says Saffo. "There's no evidence that you have to stop eating vitamin K foods when you're on these kinds of medications, but you don't want to overdo it and suddenly start taking vitamin K supplements or eat large amounts of foods with vitamin K in it."
If you want to keep your vitamin K intake steady or check whether you're having enough, we have rounded up the best food sources of vitamin K below. 
There are 113 micrograms in a cup of uncooked kale, providing 94 percent of the DV. Roast your kale with a drizzle of olive oil and a dash of salt to enjoy a crunchy, high-vitamin K snack.
This is a sign to whip out a Southern-style collard greens recipe now and again. A half cup serving of cooked collard greens provides over 400 percent of the DV of vitamin K (530 micrograms).
These bitter greens seem to have an edge when it comes to vitamin K. There are 286 micrograms in half a cup of cooked swiss chard (over 200 percent of the DV).
If you prefer something with a milder, less bitter flavor, a cup of uncooked spinach is another option, with 145 micrograms (120 percent of the DV).
Just half a cup of cooked broccoli already contains 110 micrograms, or 92 percent of the DV. Pair it with some cheese (fat!) to boost the vitamin K absorption.
Brussels sprouts hold 109 micrograms of vitamin K in half a cup, which meets 91 percent of the DV. Toss these in olive oil and salt, and roast until tender on the inside and crispy on the outside.
Having a large salad with two cups of romaine lettuce (hello, dinner caesar salad!) would give you 120 micrograms, or 130 percent of the DV, of vitamin K. 
Garnishing your bowl of soup with one tablespoon of fresh parsley offers you 62 micrograms, 50 percent of your daily vitamin K needs.
If you’re already having a daily dose of prunes for gut health, you’d be pleased to know it also offers vitamin K. A snack of six prunes contains 35 micrograms or 30 percent of the DV.
Per tablespoon, soybean oil, a vegetable oil extracted from the seeds of the soybean, contains 25 micrograms or 20 percent of the DV. It also provides you with alpha-linolenic acid, a type of omega-3 fat that’s important in eye and nerve development.
RELATED: These Are the Healthiest—and Least Healthy—Types of Fat to Eat

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Health club at former Muskegon Lakeshore Fitness Center opening soon – mlive.com

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A fitness club is expected to officially reopen in early December at the former site of a YMCA and Muskegon Community College health center on Muskegon Lake. Lynn Moore, MLive.com
MUSKEGON, MI – A fitness club is expected to officially reopen in early December at the former site of a YMCA and Muskegon Community College health center on Muskegon Lake.
The Neal Fitness Center will locate inside the building purchased by the Boys & Girls Club as a new clubhouse, the club’s director told Muskegon city commissioners Tuesday.
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Govt allows gyms in KL, Selangor, Putrajaya and other CMCO areas to reopen from Oct 19 – Malay Mail

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Saturday, 17 Oct 2020 04:39 PM MYT
BY YISWAREE PALANSAMY

Senior minister Datuk Seri Ismail Sabri Yaakob speaks during a press conference at the Parliament in Kuala Lumpur August 13, 2020. — Bernama pic
Senior minister Datuk Seri Ismail Sabri Yaakob speaks during a press conference at the Parliament in Kuala Lumpur August 13, 2020. — Bernama pic

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KUALA LUMPUR, Oct 17 — Gyms in areas that have been put under the conditional movement control order (CMCO) can resume operations beginning next Monday, Senior Minister (Security Cluster) Datuk Seri Ismail Sabri Yaakob announced today.
However, he said strict compliance with government health regulations to prevent the spread of Covid-19 must be maintained.
“After looking into the matter, the special meeting agreed to allow gyms to operate normally.
“However it must abide by tight standard operating procedures, like that issued during the initial CMCO,” he said in his security and Covid-19 regulation compliance briefing.
He noted that training in gyms were mostly done solo rather than in groups and that those exercising usually kept a physical distance from others.
Ismail also said that commercial football fields and futsal courts can also be used again, but only for training purposes.
He added that participants in these areas under the CMCO are limited to 10 people at any one time.
Further details will be announced by the Youth and Sports Ministry, he said.
The government announced last week that only non-contact sports and outdoor sports involving fewer than 10 people will be allowed during the October 14 to 27 CMCO in Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya.

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7 Delicious Snack Ideas for People with Type 2 Diabetes – Prevention.com

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Snacking can actually help manage your blood sugar. Try these tasty options.
At some point along the way, snacking got a bad reputation as something you shouldn’t do. But choosing healthy snacks is actually smart for your overall health—especially if you have type 2 diabetes. Those with the condition don’t make enough insulin or don’t use insulin well. Insulin is something our bodies need to move glucose (sugar) into cells so it can be used for energy. When this process goes awry, it can cause high blood sugar levels.
But what you put into your body may help. “For some people, snacking between meals may help with blood sugar management,” says Liz Weiss, M.S., R.D.N., host of the Liz’s Healthy Table podcast and blog. The goal is to pick nutrient-rich foods and small snacks that help support your healthy eating goals and keep your blood sugar in check.
“Focus on gut-healthy fiber, good-for-you fats, and nutrient-rich foods that provide important vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants,” Weiss says. She recommends reaching for snacks that contain lean protein, whole grains, and non-starchy fruits and vegetables. And try to steer clear of processed foods, refined carbs, sweetened drinks, and high-sodium chips.
Not sure where to start? Try out some of these nutritious, delicious DIY snack ideas from Weiss.

This dish is simple to make, and it’s packed with good-for-you nutrients. “Tuna is a source of high-quality protein,” Weiss says. “And avocados promote satiety and are low in sodium, sugar, and cholesterol.” Together, these ingredients can help fill you up and keep your blood sugar steady.
To make, mix a can of tuna with a few tablespoons of chopped red onion and dollop of light mayo or plain Greek yogurt. Then, halve an avocado and scoop the mixture inside a half. (You can wrap the other half and save it for tomorrow.)
Prefer something on the sweeter side? This delicious snack uses BOOST Nutritional Drinks to help you get plenty of protein along with important nutrients like calcium and vitamin D. Choose between chocolate-flavored BOOST Glucose Control Nutritional Drink or BOOST Glucose Control Max 30g Protein Drink—both drinks are clinically shown to produce a lower blood sugar response compared to a standard nutritional drink in people with type 2 diabetes —but the latter may be a better bet if you want even more protein in your diet to support your active lifestyle.

To make this recipe, pour just eight ounces of either drink into a container with a tight-fitting lid. Add three to four tablespoons of chia seeds, secure the lid, and shake vigorously. Refrigerate until thick, anywhere from three hours to overnight. Divide between two bowls and top with berries and a dollop of plain Greek yogurt. The nutritional drinks combined with chia seeds give you a protein-packed snack that can help you feel full for hours, Weiss says.
“Half a cup of small curd cottage cheese has over 12 grams of satisfying protein, and some research shows that it may help manage blood sugar,” Weiss says. And berries are packed with fiber to help slow digestion and keep your blood sugar even. Opt for reduced-fat cottage cheese to keep saturated fat in check.
All you need to make this dish is a bit of cottage cheese, some berries, and pantry staples. Layer cottage cheese in a small bowl with a handful of fresh blueberries or raspberries, along with a few tablespoons of whole grain breakfast cereal and chopped nuts.

A nice perk of this snack is you can mix it in bulk and split it into handful-sized portions to eat throughout the week. The sweetness in the mix comes from the raisins and dried apricots, which don’t contain added sugar, Weiss points out. “A handful of this trail mix delivers healthy fats, fiber, and protein,” she says, and can help stabilize your blood sugar levels.
To make it, simply combine lightly toasted walnuts and almonds with pumpkin or sunflower seeds. Then mix in raisins or chopped dried apricots. Be sure to keep the serving of fruit to 1 or 2 tablespoons to avoid blood sugar spikes.
Got peanut butter and an apple at home? You’re ready for this snack. Core a red or green apple and cut it into thick rings. Then spread one to two tablespoons of peanut butter over the rings. Top them with a few tablespoons of chopped nuts and raisins, and a sprinkling of whole-grain oats.
“​​One medium apple has over four grams of fiber,” Weiss says. “Add some nut butter, chopped walnuts, oats and raisins to the mix and you’ve got a snack that’s filling and satisfying with over seven grams of fiber.” Fiber, she points out, can help manage blood sugar as well.
Traditional store-bought muffins are packed with white flour and added sugar, Weiss says. And that can lead to blood sugar spikes and drops, leaving you feeling lousy. Instead, use protein-rich eggs to create snack muffins.
To make, whisk together six eggs with two tablespoons of shredded reduced-fat cheddar or mozzarella cheese. Add a cup of finely chopped non-starchy vegetables, like broccoli, cauliflower, tomato, or onion, or a blend of each. Spray six muffin tins with nonstick spray, fill them with the egg mixture, and bake at 350°F for about 18 minutes. Snack on one today and refrigerate the others in a sealed container to eat later in the week.
Make your own charcuterie board at home! Weiss likes this snack because it’s packed with protein and fiber. “Hummus is often enjoyed as a dip, which encourages more vegetable consumption,” she points out.
Start with a mini serving board and set a small bowl of hummus alongside carrots, broccoli florets, radishes, celery or any other combo of non-starchy vegetables. Apple slices and almonds round out the mix.

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