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What The Cast Of 'Dancing With The Stars' Really Eats In A Day – Women's Health

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These pros know their way around the kitchen and the dance floor.
Over the years, the cast of Dancing With The Stars has provided a lot of fitness and lifestyle inspo. Fans have turned to the likes of Julianne Hough, Cheryl Burke, and Britt Stewart for tips on exercise routines and how to stay motivated.
Along with their fitness advice comes dietary suggestions. And I don’t mean diet fads. I’m talking about ways to eat clean and have balanced meals throughout the day. Even more importantly, pro dancers like Sharna Burgess have talked about the importance of indulging, and Britt is all about listening to what your body wants. So, yes, eat that piece of chocolate cake!!!
The professional dancers have even passed their wisdom on to their celebrity counterparts throughout the years. For fan-favorite Kelly Osbourne, her partner’s recommendations led to a 20-pound weight loss and total lifestyle change. (More on that later.) And AJ McLean got a head start on eating for the job by adjusting his diet one month before his season started.
Some of the pros (and a few celebs, too) have documented what they eat on their Instagrams, so you can follow along on their nutritional journey. For some cast members, that means opting for easy-to-make meals (I see you, Lindsay Arnold), whereas others (*cough cough* Artem Chigvintsev) are waaaayyy more savvy in the kitchen.
All in all, the DWTS cast members’ diets run the gamut. Curious? Here’s what the cast (new and old) *actually* eats in a day.
Pro dancer Witney Carson has tried it all when it comes to dieting. “I’ve done keto before, and I felt really gross,” Witney told Women’s Health. “I did lose weight on it, but my skin broke out. I have eczema and my eczema was super, super bad. I think I have an allergy to dairy and cheese, so I try to stay away as much as I can now.”
Now, Witney’s back to the basics. She eats a lot of whole foods and tries to keep a clean diet, which includes lean meats and minimal carbs. Her meals consist of oats in the morning to hold her over till lunch, when she has greens and protein. She gets an energy boost in the afternoon from nuts, a protein bar, or even plain turkey lunch meat. And there is one thing she doesn’t have for dinner: carbs.
Jenna Johnson, who made history this year as part of the first same-sex pairing on DWTS, had an awful relationship with food for a while, she told Women’s Health. After gaining weight on a vegetarian diet, she started incorporated meat back in, consuming more protein, and ultimately slimming down.
“Looking at food as fuel has been a game changer for me,” Jenna said. “For me, what makes me healthiest and happiest and most powerful is a happy balance of non-processed food and a lot of protein. I need it for recovery and for my muscle.”
The season 26 winner starts her day off with eggs, but ditches the coffee for kombucha. (Now that’s brave, IMHO.) For lunch, she consumes leafy greens with a side of protein, like chicken or shrimp. When it comes to snacks, she opts for nuts, berries, and the occasional hard boiled egg. Jenna doesn’t go without dessert after dinner (which usually consists of chicken, quinoa, and green veggies) and opts for dark chocolate or a vegan treat.
Britt Stewart, who joined the cast on season 29, has been gluten-free for 11 years for health reasons, she told Women’s Health. Her diet practice is all about intuitive eating.
“I really believe in intuitive eating and listening to your body, and not in the fad diets that are popular in the moment,” she said.
In the morning, Britt is all about her organic coffee. Sometimes, she’ll follow that up with a green smoothie or yogurt and granola. When she’s burning calories during rehearsals, she’ll snack a couple times a day. In the morning, she reaches for fruit, while her afternoon snack is a little more savory (think veggie chips and hummus). For lunch, she keeps it plant-based with a big salad. Dinner is when she really listens to her body and what it wants—which can be anything from stir fry to a steak. Occasionally, she reaches into the freezer for a pint of ice cream.
Veteran pro Cheryl Burke shed pounds in 2014 following a very specific diet. During the pandemic, Cheryl talked all things fitness with Hollywood Life, including what she stocked up on.
“I’m totally addicted to Hippeas snacks. Also water, green tea and dark chocolate açaí and blueberries,” she said. “Whenever we can manage to get…pasta and marinara sauce, it’s a good day! Also, lots of greens for [husband Matthew Lawrence]’s reptiles, who are vegan as well, so they have to share their greens with me!”
Lindsay Arnold—who was paired up with Matt James in season 30 until their shocking departure—often shares easy recipes on her Instagram. This yummy summer salad is one of Lindsay’s go-tos. For breakfast, she opts for avocado toast and granola and yogurt with berries.
“Quick & Easy breakfast 🤗🤗 for people like me who don’t have the time *or the skill* for the fancy stuff 😂😂😂 but still want something that is tasty and good for you!!!” she wrote.
She also hits up Trader Joe’s for its pizza kits (a woman after my own heart), but you won’t find any mushrooms or tomatoes on it.
Not only does season 29 winner Artem Chigvinstev share recipes on Instagram, he’s also going to culinary school, his fiancée Nikki Bella revealed. He even made her banana bread with chocolate chips in it while she was pregnant. Now that’s love!
As for his IG, he’s shown off his impressive strawberry shortcake, a classic BEC, and a simple pasta recipe with his followers.
Sharna Burgess is all about having her cake and eating it too—literally!
“Wanting for yourself is human, WHICH YOU ARE, and as long as you move with kindness, courage and gratitude throughout life.. you aren’t hurting anyone by going after your own desires. Find things that make you feel good, and keep doing them. So… eat the [f—ing] cake 😘✨,” she wrote on IG to accompany a photo of her eating a nice slice of cake.
The season 27 mirrorball trophy winner is all about indulging—whether it’s coffee or donuts. She also promotes Hello Fresh, as a way to accommodate her busy schedule.
Two-time mirrorball trophy winner Peta Murgatroyd fell in love with cooking when she started a family with fellow pro Maksim Chmerkovskiy.
“I used to loathe it, because I never had to do it and therefore never had the passion for it,” she told People. “Now that I’m a mother and I am concerned with what my child is eating, I am more inclined to cook at home, to ensure I know exactly what’s going in his mouth.”
For breakfast, she takes her coffee with half and half and agave, and she has a four-egg omelet with goat cheese, five slices of smoked salmon, capers, and dill. Her go-to lunch is a salad with chicken, cucumber, flaxseed, tomatoes, red onion, dill, and balsamic vinegar dressing. As for dinner, she prefers a 5 oz., dry-rub steak with steamed veggies.
Former pro and judge Julianne Hough is always on the go—especially with her company Kinrgy. She maintains a balanced diet, but definitely knows when it’s time to indulge.
“I try to cut myself some slack if I’m being consistent with my nutrition and activity,” Julianne told People. “If I am craving a piece of chocolate I go for something dark to satisfy the craving.”
Julianne is all about hydration and drinks 4-6 glasses of water per day. She also incorporates two smoothies into her daily diet: one pre-workout and one as a snack. Her breakfast comprises of two steamed eggs over easy with tomatoes and avocados and a cup of English Breakfast tea. She opts for a boneless, skinless chicken breast over greens and veggies for lunch, and she rounds out her day with baked salmon, sautéed spinach, and a seltzer.
To keep up with his rigorous workout routine, former DWTS pro and current judge Derek Hough has to maintain his caloric intake.
He told Men’s Health that he has a “very L.A.-looking fridge.” It’s full of oat milk, celery juice, avocados, pickles, and kombucha. His diet consistently features chicken, fish, quinoa, sweet potatoes, and other vegetables. Derek’s one temptation: movie theater candy.
In preparation for each season, Alan Bersten keeps a clean diet. That means “cheat day” is his favorite day.
His go-to meal is a carb-filled pizza with a lot of mozzarella, plenty of veggies, and sausage. As for his day-to-day indulgences, it looks like he’s a big fan of La Croix and orange juice, according to his IG. Wait, are those Fruity Pebbles I see?
Maksim Chmerkovskiy spent 17 seasons on DWTS and is now a judge on the Ukrainian version. The hunky Latin-ballroom champion uses his Instagram to document his journey with intermittent fasting.
“My 1pm breakfast 🍳 That 16/8 kinda life 💪🏼 Eggs, pickles, sourdough bagel, kerrygold butter, black caviar, coffee (w coconut oil & honey),” he captioned one of his posts. He loves to show off his breakfasts, late-night grilling, and incredible seafood choices.
When she was pregnant with twins, former DWTS pro Kym Johnson shared some helpful tips for those struggling with unhealthy cravings.
“My answer to that is simple: just indulge yourself,” she told People. “Don’t feel guilty or be too hard on yourself about your cravings. Balance out your cravings with healthy food. Try to stay away from processed food and meat or food your doctor has advised you not to eat.”
During pregnancy, she craved chocolate croissants, but her favorite meals include salmon, salads, and scrambled eggs. She loves snacking on apple slices, dried apricots, and Greek yogurt with some berries. She occasionally shares her eats on IG, including this St. Patrick’s Day frittata and a gorgeous charcuterie board.
Gleb Savchenko doesn’t post much about his diet, but he does love margaritas. He shared a recipe for a watermelon marg (YUM) that features fellow pro Keo Motsepe. He also promotes ICON Meals kits.
Edyta Śliwińska may have officially exited DWTS after season 22, but she’s still dancing. That means she maintains a healthy diet—even during her 2020 pregnancy.
“I try to do something active every day. I’m putting in an hour a day of physical activity,” she told People. “I do a lot of cardio because it helps me with my energy. I’m eating really healthy and I’m feeling great.”
She even gets her children engaged with picking fresh produce, like these HUGE lemons.
Season 29 newbie Daniella Karagach documented her morning on her personal vlog.
In it, she gets ready for her day, which includes downing a glass of apple cider vinegar mixed with water. She swears it’s healthy for you, but does not taste good. She typically follows that up with a bowl of oats, flaxseed, peanut butter, and coconut.
Former DWTS pro Allison Holker is running a household full of kiddos, and she’s teaching them all about nutrition.
“As a mom, I am always looking for new ways to teach my kids about the importance of nutrition and overall well-being,” she wrote on IG. Her page is full of fun recipes to do with the kids, like these fun treats.
As for her personal diet, Allison sticks to mostly veggies. “For the most part, I eat only vegetables and fruits and I drink a lot of water. I think for my body that is really the best fuel for me—I sleep better at night and I feel like my skin looks better because of eating vegetables and not eating meat,” Allison told Hollywood Life.
Anna Trebunskaya—whose last appearance was on season 21—maintained a balanced diet throughout her pregnancy in 2020, but she definitely indulged. “I really loved pickles and olives during my first trimester. Now I switched to more desserts. My go-to dessert is coconut ice cream vanilla flavor,” Anna told People.
She even takes her young ones apple picking.
Former DWTS pro Karina Smirnoff looooves seafood—and she even shared favorite recipes with fans. “I shared two of my favorite easy seafood recipes that give you protein for your fuel healthy muscle growth without those extra calories and fat!” she wrote on her IG.
They include zucchini swordfish and miso-glazed salmon.
Since ending his run on DWTS, there’s one thing known about Tony Dovolani’s diet: It includes ice cream. In 2016, he started supporting his friend’s ice cream shop, Double Twister, in Connecticut.
As of 2020, Tony runs his own shop called Scoopin, which is also in Connecticut. So if you want a couple scoops or an ice cream cake, Tony can hook you up.
Former DWTS pro Louis van Amstel has been getting into the kitchen more, according to his Instagram. He made his first-ever cherry delight pie last year. His other faves include chips and salsa (in the bath) and wiener schnitzel when he’s in Europe.
After his five-season run on DWTS, Tristan MacManus moved back to Ireland and became a morning show anchor, where he sometimes steps into the kitchen with his guests. He even takes what he learns at work and applies it to his own cooking. I mean, look at this mac and cheese 🤤.
Not much is known about Keo Motsepe’s current eating habits, but he does chow down on salads in his trailer.
One month before joining the cast of DWTS season 29, AJ McLean did an overhaul on his exercise routine and diet. “I’m on a very strict diet, grain-free, gluten-free, sugar-free, no sodas of any kind, and completely sober for almost nine months,” McLean told Us Weekly.
Before stepping foot on the dance floor with partner, Cheryl Burke, the Backstreet Boys member dropped 15 pounds.
Model Christie Brinkley didn’t have to change her diet before going on DWTS, but she did have to change it after. When she broke her arm—resulting in an early departure and her daughter, Sailor, taking her spot on the show—the lifelong vegetarian briefly introduced salmon into her diet.
“I’ve added salmon because it is rich in omega-3 fatty acids which help regulate inflammation that causes joint stiffness and pain and is also excellent source of calcium and vitamin D, which help to maintain bone strength and speed healing…especially important for me now!” she wrote on IG.
Kelly Osbourne placed third during season nine of DWTS and lost 20 pounds during her experience. But her diet did not match the exercise she was putting in at first.
“I’d fill up on French fries and pizza all day and wonder why I wasn’t losing weight,” she said at the time. “In the very beginning, I kept getting sick during rehearsals because I was eating such terrible, fatty food and feeling so exhausted.”
Her partner, Louis Van Amstel, introduced her to a high-protein, low-carb diet to help keep her energized.
Property Brothers star Drew Scott had to restrict his diet so much during DWTS that, after the finale, a celebration meal was first on his list. “We’re going to go out, and I’m going to eat a lot of food tonight,” he told Us Weekly. “I want a burger, a hot dog, and sushi.”
To prepare for DWTS, rapper Lil’ Kim signed up for the food delivery service Freshology and started tracking her caloric intake. After the show, she continued tracking, avoiding heavy foods, and staying hydrated.

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What Causes Narcolepsy? These Factors May Play a Role | Health.com – Health.com

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In many cases, chronic sleepiness is tied to low levels of certain brain chemicals.
When diagnosed with a new condition, the first question is almost always "How?" We naturally want to know exactly what brought us to that moment. This curiosity may be even stronger with something like narcolepsy, a chronic sleep disorder that is both under-recognized and misunderstood, according to the nonprofit Project Sleep.
While scientists have yet to pinpoint the exact cause of narcolepsy, a majority of cases are tied to low levels of a brain chemical involved in regulating our sleep-wake cycle, according to the Cleveland Clinic. And other factors are thought to play a role in triggering the disease process.
Here's how sleep experts explain the causes of narcolepsy.
Before delving into the causes, let's consider what narcolepsy looks like.
Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, hallucinations, sleep paralysis, vivid dreams, and more, says Steven Thau, MD, division chief of the Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine Department and medical director of the Sleep Center at Phelps Hospital/Northwell Health.
It can present at any point in a person's life, but most commonly it initially occurs in a person's teens or 20s, Dr. Thau tells Health.
While each case is different, excessive daytime sleepiness is generally the first symptom to surface. Symptoms such as hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and cataplexy may follow, says Manjamalai Sivaraman, MD, FAASM, a sleep medicine specialist and neurologist at the University of Missouri. The latter may not happen for a few years, if at all. 
RELATED: What Are the Types of Narcolepsy? Sleep Experts Explain the Differing Presentations of This Sleep Disorder
There are two main types of narcolepsy: types 1 and 2. There's also a third known as secondary narcolepsy. (More on that one below.)
Narcolepsy type 1 covers anyone who has low levels of hypocretin (a brain chemical that controls wakefulness) and experiences cataplexy (sudden muscle loss), according to the Mayo Clinic. Type 1 makes up about 70% of narcolepsy cases, says Richard Bogan, MD, a medical officer at SleepMed, Inc. and associate clinical professor at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine and the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.
People with narcolepsy type 2 may experience all the symptoms of narcolepsy except cataplexy—and their symptoms are often less severe, says the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). And their hypocretin levels are usually normal.
While there are no known ways to prevent or cure type 1 or type 2 narcolepsy, NINDS notes that lifestyle changes and medications may be helpful for maintaining alertness and managing other symptoms.
RELATED: Is Narcolepsy Genetic? What Sleep Experts Say About Inheriting This Chronic Disorder
While the science is still evolving, here's what's known so far.
People with type 1 narcolepsy have very low levels of brain chemicals called hypocretins. These chemicals, first discovered in 1998, are important for a couple of reasons, per the Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School. For one thing, they keep people awake and alert. They also prevent people from drifting off into REM (rapid-eye movement) sleep while they're awake.
In people type 1 narcolepsy, however, the nerve cells that produce hypocretins die off, and the resulting dearth of these chemicals leads to sleepiness and poorly regulated REM sleep, per Harvard's Sleep Medicine Division.
Research by two separate investigative teams suggests that type 1 narcolepsy is caused by a severe loss of neurons that produce these chemicals, per a 2015 review in the New England Journal of Medicine.
As for what causes type 2 narcolepsy? It's possible that people who have this form of the disorder may sustain less injury to their neurons than those with type 1, according to that same review, which references a 2009 Sleep study. But data on the disease process involved in type 2 narcolepsy "are quite limited," notes the New England Journal.
Bottom line: Scientists don't fully understand what triggers the loss of hypocretin-producing cells, although it appears that one or more of the following factors may be involved:
Most people with narcolepsy, especially type 1, have a gene variation known as HLA-DQB1*06:02. It is a variation of the HLA-DQB1 gene, which "provides instructions for making part of a protein that plays an important role in the immune system," according the US National Library of Medicine. The risk of narcolepsy associated with this variation and related genes is unclear to researchers at this time.
That same gene variation is found in 50% of people with narcolepsy type 2, but only 12-30% of the general population, according to the New England Journal.
Speaking of risk factors, narcolepsy isn't a disorder that tends to run in the family. According to NINDS, just up to 10% of people with type 1 narcolepsy have a close family member who presents with similar symptoms. If a parent has narcolepsy, the odds of passing it down to a child is only about 1%, says Mayo Clinic.
People with the HLA-DQB1*06:02 gene variation may be at increased risk of developing narcolepsy after being exposed to a trigger, such as an infection, says NINDS. That's based on studies of people after they developed narcolepsy.
Upper airway infections such as streptococcus pyogenes and influenza A (including H1N1) are strongly associated with narcolepsy, per a 2011 study in the Annals of Neurology, especially in cases where it begins in childhood, notes Dr. Sivaraman.
We know that people with narcolepsy type 1 have low hypocretin levels—but why? A leading theory considers narcolepsy to be an autoimmune disorder.
"There are supporting evidences for autoimmune destruction—the immune system in one's body attacking its own healthy cells—of hypocretin neurons in the hypothalamus of the brain," says Dr. Sivaraman. To break it down, if this theory is true, then a person's own immune system is responsible for the brain lacking in hypocretin.
As Dr. Thau puts it, in this case, "the cells that control wakefulness are damaged."
Currently, researchers are working on using immunotherapy to reverse this loss, Dr. Bogan tells Health. According to a 2020 review published in Current Treatment Options in Neurology, small studies have shown an improvement in symptoms for narcolepsy patients after using immunotherapy treatment, especially those who recently presented with the disease. However, the experiments were uncontrolled and did not have clear endpoints, requiring more research to achieve any definitive answer on the treatment's benefits.  
RELATED: 7 Narcolepsy Symptoms to Know, According to Sleep Specialists
Unlike narcolepsy types 1 and 2, doctors do know the "why" behind secondary narcolepsy. This form of narcolepsy occurs when the brain's hypothalamus region gets damaged, according to Harvard's Division of Sleep Medicine.
These people can experience all of the same symptoms as those with types 1 and 2. However, they might also have severe neurological problems and require a large amount of sleep—typically 10 hours or more.
"In rare cases, brain lesions or diseases such as tumors, vascular malformations, strokes or inflammatory diseases of the brain can result in the destruction of the signaling pathways that increase brain activity and promote wakefulness," says Dr. Thau.
According to the National Health Service, secondary narcolepsy causes include:
As Dr. Thau notes, "a healthy lifestyle and avoiding smoking or the use of illicit drugs decrease the risk of some of the disorders that cause secondary narcolepsy."
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Mount Laurel police asks public's help in finding child – Courier Post

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MOUNT LAUREL – Police are asking the public’s help in finding a 6-year-old girl who was allegedly abducted by her non-custodial mother.
The girl, Grace Craytor of Pennsauken, was last seen around 7:10 p.m. Monday with her mother, Kristina Maletteri, at Lifetime Fitness in Mount Laurel, according to township police.
The girl’s father, who has a full custody order for Grace, had invited Maletteri to swim with the child during a supervised visit at the facility at Church and Fellowship roads, said a police account.
 “At some point, Ms. Maletteri is said to have taken her daughter and left the area without consent,” the account said.
Maletteri is known to drive a 2017 silver Audi Q3 with New Jersey license plates “S64MPY.”
The missing child is 46 inches tall, 70 pounds, with blonde hair and hazel eyes, police said.
Anyone with information is asked to call Mount Laurel police at 856-234-8300 or the confidential tip line 856-234-1414, extension 1599.
Tips can also be emailed to Lamaro@mountlaurelpd.org.
Jim Walsh covers public safety, economic development and other beats for the Courier-Post, Burlington County Times and The Daily Journal.
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Healthy Snacks for the Office – How to Pack Food for Work – menshealth.com

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Our product picks are editor-tested, expert-approved. We may earn a commission through links on our site.
Allow these experts to help pack your lunchbox.
Buh-bye, vending machine. Here are four easy ways to boost your energy at work. Plus, three moves to make any lunch meeting extra appetizing.
Combine carbs and protein for long-lasting energy, says Marisa Moore, R.D.N., an integrative dietitian. Mix roasted, lightly salted sunflower seeds and dried blueberries in a small jar for a snack that’s sweet, salty, and crunchy. Bonus: The unsaturated fats in the seeds will keep you feeling full.
A favorite of Cara Harbstreet, R.D., of Street Smart Nutrition, is protein- and omega-3-rich tuna or salmon (StarKist makes packaged versions) spread on sliced cucumbers or mini bell peppers. Drizzle with your favorite hot sauce for a tiny yet protein-packed meal.
Jordan Mazur, R.D., director of nutrition for the San Francisco 49ers, suggests these key ingredients: shredded rotisserie chicken for lean protein; pistachios, walnuts, pumpkin seeds,dried tart cherries, and dark chocolate chips for a healthy trail mix; and antioxidant-rich blueberries or grapes.
Don’t go more than three to four hours without eating, to help keep your blood sugar steady. You can avoid mindless snacking by setting an alarm to get up every hour instead of reaching for the chips, says Kelly Hogan Laubinger, R.D
As we head back to the office, those DIY outdoor lunches can still be the thing to do.
TRY A HEARTY SALAD IN A JAR, says Moore. Build it from the bottom up: Start with a vinaigrette, then add chickpeas, carrots, tomatoes, olives, and cucumbers. Add feta to the top for a salty, tangy finish. Close, and shake when ready to eat.
REINVENT YOUR SANDWICH. Slapping protein and a salad’s worth of greens between whole-grain bread works well, too: Try sliced turkey or canned tuna, topped with sprouts, cucumbers, leafy greens, avocado, and tomato.
MAKE A HEALTHY CHEESE BOARD, says Harbstreet. Go with hard cheeses like cheddar and Gouda and a soft cheese like cottage. Pair pita bread or crispy crackers with jerky or low-sodium deli meats. Then toss in pistachios and blueberries.
This article appears in the October 2021 issue of Men’s Health.

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