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20 ways to make money: Online and offline ideas – Bankrate.com

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If you’re in need of some money and you’re ready to hustle, there are plenty of legitimate ways to make some extra money. While some options won’t earn you much, they may be enough to help you make that credit card payment or cover gas for your car.
Here are 20 ways to make money online and offline while maintaining some flexibility in your schedule.
As a freelance content writer, you take on assignments to write articles, blogs, technical pieces and other types of content. In this type of work, you’ll typically earn a certain amount per word or a set amount predetermined by the company. As a freelance writer, you could find yourself writing on anything from higher education to marketing content. You can find work on websites like Upwork, FlexJobs and Fiverr.
If you’re a handy person, you could market your skills to friends and neighbors. Not everyone is handy, so this can be a much appreciated skill that people are willing to pay for. By doing maintenance work on the side, you could be working on anything from repairs to minor plumbing.
Check out the Handy app if you’re interested in getting paid for maintenance work.
If you’re not very handy but still want to work with your hands, yard work can be an excellent way to make some money on the side. Shovel snow, mow the lawn, rake leaves — many people are willing to pay for someone else to do work around their yard.
If you have a fairly new car and a good driving record, driving for a transportation service like Uber or Lyft can be an easy and flexible way to make some quick money on the side. You can work on a schedule that fits your lifestyle, whether that means working early mornings, nights or weekends.
TaskRabbit is an app that focuses on matching people who need chores done with people who are looking to earn some money. This could include simple tasks from moving furniture to cleaning someone’s kitchen. Just set your rate and availability so people can then hire you on the platform.
Creative and artistic? Consider selling your wares on a website like Etsy where people regularly visit to purchase jewelry, art pieces, clothing and trinkets. To break even, be sure to budget the cost of materials and shipping compared to how much you’re charging your customers.
For budgeting help, sign up for Bankrate’s myMoney tool to categorize your spending transactions, identify ways to cut back and improve your financial health.
Handy with furniture and good at finding a bargain? Purchasing cheap furniture and fixing it up to work and look better could earn you some money if you’re able to sell it to someone. Consider posting your work online or set up a booth at a flea market.
By watching other people’s children, you can easily make quite a bit of money, especially if you specialize in working with special needs kids or are trained for emergency situations. On websites like Care.com, you can find plenty of families looking for a trusted baby sitter. Care.com will take care of background checks and asks applicants other important questions parents will want to know about you.
If child care isn’t your thing, there are also plenty of ways to make a few bucks watching people’s pets or walking their dogs. Consider downloading the Rover or Wag apps. It will connect you to pet owners looking for some help with their furry friends. Once you start working and building up good reviews, that can help you land more jobs on Rover over time.
While it’s certainly not a lucrative way to earn some extra money, by donating plasma, you can earn about $30 per donation. You can donate your plasma up to twice a week. Each state or city may have different requirements so be sure to check with the plasma donation center you’re planning to visit.
Renting out your home to traveling strangers is an excellent way to make some money. If you’re someone who isn’t home much — perhaps you travel often — or you have an extra bedroom, offering your home up as an Airbnb might be the best way for you to make some extra cash. Set your house rules, get some nice photos of your home and decide your schedule for when your home is available.
Much like content writing, graphic design work is in high demand. You’ll need to have a good grasp of Adobe products and a solid portfolio. Do some online research and you should be able to find gigs on platforms like like Fiverr.
Do you have available space in your home that could serve as a space for an extra person to live? Consider opening up your home to someone that you trust to take over a spare bedroom or basement to rent out. That way, you can make some extra money to put toward rent or your mortgage without having to do any work. Just make sure you set up a written lease agreement with the other person so you can avoid legal trouble down the road should it come up.
Many businesses and organizations struggle or don’t have the resources to navigate social media and keep their accounts updated. It can be an overwhelming task if a business doesn’t have enough staff to prioritize it. For this reason, many companies are willing to pay others to manage and update their various pages, whether that’s Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or something else.
Want some quick money without doing much work? Look into market research. Lots of companies look for input from consumers on products and services, and want your opinion. Typically, all it involves is you using or testing a product or service then writing a review, answering a survey, or discussing it with other testers.
Have an old gaming console or an old phone that’s gathering dust on the shelf? From Facebook Marketplace to Craigslist, there are a lot of buyers out there looking to get their hands on used, affordable tech. You could even go as far as purchasing electronics and fix them or refurbish them before selling them off again for a higher price.
If you’re fluent in speaking English or another language, use your knowledge to teach others. The best part is you don’t even need to have teaching experience in many cases, and some websites will even provide lesson plans for you to follow. You can sign up with platforms like iTalki, where you can teach adults.
If driving people around for Uber doesn’t sound right for you, maybe delivering food is a better fit. With services like UberEats, PostMates, Grubhub and Doordash, you can contour your work schedule as a driver around your normal schedule and deliver food orders. Even better? You can choose whether to deliver in your car, bicycle or any other type of transportation.
During the COVID-19 pandemic, many people tried to avoid going to the grocery store as much as possible. As life begins to normalize, many customers still want to avoid visiting the grocery store. If you’re looking to make some extra cash, you can apply to become an Instacart shopper and pick up and deliver groceries for people.
If teaching sounds like something you would enjoy and be good at, look into sites like Chegg, Studypool and GigEd. This will offer you the opportunity to teach subject matters that you’re interested in and have experience and/or knowledge in. With Chegg, you can become an online tutor and teach students via video. Studypool allows students to post questions and will pay you to answer them.
Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.
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5 education issues to watch as Tennessee lawmakers return – Chalkbeat Tennessee

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One year after tackling pandemic-related school challenges during a special legislative session called by Gov. Bill Lee, Tennessee lawmakers return to the Capitol this week with another major focus on students: how to fund public education.
Lee wants to overhaul the 30-year-old formula that determines how much money the state distributes to school systems, as well as how much local governmental agencies should contribute. He’s expected to work with fellow GOP leaders to offer a legislative proposal this month.
But some say the legislature shouldn’t rush that discussion, especially since it took years to come up with the current formula known as the Basic Education Program, or BEP.
“It’s OK to hold this and keep working on it if we need to,” said Rep. Scott Cepicky, a Republican from Maury County. “Let’s get this right.”
Lawmakers also aren’t inclined toward a lengthy session during an election year. They’ll look to pass a budget and wrap up by mid-April, if possible, so they can return home to campaign.
Until then, here are five issues to watch:
Since October when Lee called for a review of the state’s funding formula, Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn has spearheaded the process that included eight town halls and dozens of meetings with policymakers and education leaders.
Last week, she called the issue “the biggest policy decision we make” and said Tennessee should seize this “moment in time.” She also hinted a draft proposal will be unveiled early this week.
“There is funding that is potentially available, there is momentum. We see need across the state,” she told a forum hosted by Tennesseans for Quality Early Education.
The review, which aims to shift Tennessee to a more student-centered funding approach, has drawn public praise but generated private concerns about its intent. Many public school advocates worry the goal is to pave the way for a new private school voucher program halted by ongoing litigation, though the governor has denied that.
“I’m trying to keep an open mind and not draw conclusions before getting all the information,” said Sen. Ferrell Haile, a Gallatin Republican who is on Lee’s 12-member review committee to create a new strategy.
Schwinn said any future formula must factor in the needs of individual children. That includes students who have disabilities, are English language learners, or come from low-income families.
Currently, enrollment is the main component of the BEP, a formula with 46 components that determine how much school systems receive to pay for teacher salaries and other needs like textbooks, technology, and bus transportation. But districts have flexibility on how to spend that money, which explains why the BEP is considered a funding formula, not a spending plan.
“We want to put more money into education, but we want to make sure the money is being spent well,” said Rep. Mark White, a Memphis Republican who chairs a House education committee and supports forging a new formula this year. “Let’s give it our best shot.”
Whether the state revises its funding formula this year or not, the legislature must pass a budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1 — and is flush with cash. Tax collections during the pandemic’s economic rebound were higher than projected. The state also is sitting on hundreds of millions of dollars in federal grants intended to help working low-income families.
Meanwhile, Tennessee ranks 44th in the nation for student funding, according to the Education Law Center, which gave the state Fs last year for its funding level and funding effort.
The state’s BEP review committee, an influential panel of policymakers and education leaders, has urged the governor to prioritize more funding for school nurses and counselors to get Tennessee to nationally recommended ratios. A $110-million annual investment would fund 1 nurse for every 750 students instead of the current 1:3,000, and 1 counselor for every 250 students instead of the current ratios of 1:500 and 1:350 for elementary and secondary schools, respectively.
In addition to perennial discussions about raising teacher pay, there’s talk about expanding Tennessee’s pre-K program, which serves a fifth of the state’s 4-year-olds. Most districts have waiting lists.
During the pandemic, consensus has grown that pre-K and early grades are the best places for impactful interventions to address learning lag and social-emotional challenges.
“It’s a timely topic that is deserving of deep discussions,” Haile said.
A controversial proposal to limit which supplemental materials teachers can use advanced last year in two House panels before stalling in the Senate Education Committee.
Sen. Janice Bowling, a Republican from Tullahoma, promised to bring her bill back for consideration this year and address worries that “good” materials from organizations like the Tennessee Farm Bureau could be excluded.
The bill, co-sponsored by Rep. Terri Lynn Weaver of Lancaster, would prohibit teachers from using materials that supplant state-approved textbooks unless district leaders approve those materials in advance. Any approved print or electronic materials would be listed on district websites.
“We absolutely need to do something,” agreed Sen. Brian Kelsey, a Republican from Germantown, “but we need to do it in a way that doesn’t have unintended consequences.”
The president of the state’s largest teachers organization called the proposal “demoralizing” for teachers and logistically impossible for school districts. For instance, a teacher couldn’t use yesterday’s newspaper in a current events class.
“This is a move toward completely scripted lessons,” said Beth Brown of the Tennessee Education Association, noting that a new Tennessee law already restricts what teachers can discuss in their classes about racism, white privilege, and unconscious bias.
State testing went well last year, with a 95% participation rate despite the pandemic. But lawmakers are still expected to bring several proposals to change when and how tests are administered.
Expect one proposal to require that testing occur during the last 20 days of the school year, instead of the earlier testing window set by the education department.
“That’s going to give our teachers an extra 30 days of instruction time, which is a lot,” said Cepicky.
Other likely legislation would require students in grades 3-8 to continue testing on paper, while local school systems could opt to move students in higher grades to online exams.
This school year, Tennessee high schoolers are taking their exams online under the state’s plan to transition back to computerized testing after several years of technical snafus.
Should teachers be judged on how much their students know — or how much they grow?
Tennessee has mostly focused on the latter when evaluating their educators and schools through an academic growth model that measures learning over time, regardless of whether students are proficient.
But the complexity and opaqueness of the state’s statistical growth method, combined with increasing frustration over low student proficiency, could renew that debate among lawmakers this year.
“We’ve been doing this for 10 years, and where are we?” asked Cepicky, complaining that only a third of the state’s third graders are reading on grade level.
“Meanwhile, we’ve created an evaluation system where a teacher can get an A in academic growth even if their students aren’t proficient readers. We’ve got to get that commitment back to getting our kids proficient,” he said.
Such a move would mark a dramatic change for Tennessee, considered a pioneer in using “value-added” measurements to judge teachers and schools. For a decade, the guiding principle has been that all students can advance, regardless of out-of-school factors like poverty that might hold them back.
Other issues are sure to surface before this year’s legislature, including more funding for charter school facilities and how to address the state’s worsening teacher shortage. The statistics on the teacher supply is especially troubling, with thousands of Tennessee educators expected to retire by 2024 and fewer candidates entering teacher training programs.
“We’ve got to be creating multiple pathways to teaching in our state, and we’ve got to have a competitive wage,” said JC Bowman, executive director of Professional Educators of Tennessee.
The 2022 session of the 112th General Assembly convenes at noon Central Time on Tuesday. Visit the legislature’s website to track legislation, livestream meetings, and contact legislators.
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Chalkbeat is a nonprofit newsroom dedicated to providing the information families and educators need, but this kind of work isn’t possible without your help.
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Made a Lot of Money in the Stock Market This Year? Here's How to Lower Your Capital Gains Taxes. – The Motley Fool

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Returns as of 01/18/2022
Returns as of 01/18/2022
Founded in 1993 by brothers Tom and David Gardner, The Motley Fool helps millions of people attain financial freedom through our website, podcasts, books, newspaper column, radio show, and premium investing services.
Despite recent volatility, it’s been a pretty strong year for the stock market. And at this point, you may be sitting on gains in your portfolio, at least on paper. If you’re eager to sell some stocks at a profit and make those gains official, you should know that doing so could raise your tax bill significantly.
Whenever you sell investments at a profit, you’re required to pay capital gains taxes, the amount of which will hinge on how long you hold those stocks prior to unloading them. If you keep your stocks for a year or less before selling them, you’ll be subject to short-term capital gains, which are taxed the same way as ordinary income. If you hold your stocks for at least a year and a day before selling, you’ll be bumped into the more favorable long-term capital gains category.
But either way, capital gains could cause you to owe the IRS quite a bit of money. And so if you’re looking at a big profit this year, there’s one move it pays to make.
Image source: Getty Images.
Your goal as an investor is no doubt to buy stocks that make you money. But sometimes, that doesn’t happen.
When you get stuck holding stocks that are underperforming, sometimes, selling them at a loss is your best option. But the good news is that taking a loss in your portfolio is a great way to minimize the hit of capital gains taxes.
Say you’re sitting on $10,000 in capital gains this year. If you take a $10,000 loss in your portfolio, you’ll cancel out the capital gains taxes you owe. And, just as importantly, you’ll free up money you can use to invest in different stocks — ones that may perform much better or lend to more diversity in your portfolio.
Now you may end up with capital losses that exceed your gains for the year. But that’s OK, because you can use some of that excess loss to offset ordinary income — up to $3,000 worth, in fact.
So, say you take a $10,000 loss in your portfolio but you only have a $7,000 gain this year. In that case, you’ll still get to use your entire loss for the current tax year.
But even if that’s not the case — say, you have a $10,000 loss and only a $6,000 gain — you can carry the remainder of your loss into future tax years and use it to offset your tax bill at the time. So for example, in this scenario, you’d carry $1,000 of your loss into 2022 and potentially use it then.
Making money on stocks is a good thing, but only if it doesn’t cause a huge tax crunch for you. If you’ve profited nicely in 2021, it pays to see if there are losing stocks in your portfolio worth selling. Doing so could really help minimize this year’s tax burden, not to mention set you up with more money to invest with in 2022.

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HOD tackles license portability, policy changes – American Veterinary Medical Association

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The AVMA House of Delegates (HOD) took on issues such as veterinary license portability across states and policy changes at a weekend meeting held January 7-8, during the Association’s annual Veterinary Leadership Conference.
The House’s Veterinary Information Forum addressed ways to make it easier for veterinarians licensed in one state to gain licenses in other states, as well as how to increase support for veterinary team members. During its regular business meeting, the House approved a new policy supporting collection of antimicrobial use data as well as updates to the AVMA policies on rabies and rabies vaccination waivers.
The AVMA News team reported on all of the HOD actions in articles published shortly after the meeting concluded. These are available for all in the profession to read online:
The House also said farewell to four colleagues for whom the weekend meeting was their last one as members of the House of Delegates. Please join in congratulating and thanking these volunteers retiring from the House of Delegates. Those retiring, their affiliation, and years of service were:
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