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5 Ways to Make Money on Instagram – business.com – Business.com

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At first glance, it may seem hard to imagine how you can monetize Instagram. It's primarily a photo-sharing app, after all. But think about the hundreds of thousands the Kardashians make for a single Instagram post, or the top bloggers who earn a few thousand dollars for content collaborations on Instagram, and you might reconsider.
These Instagrammers have reach and influence all worked out. Together, these two factors offer Instagram content creators the opportunity to explore various revenue streams.
Before you think about earning thousands of dollars on Instagram, let me ask you a question.
Your reach and influence depends on the quality of your audience. It is the only factor that decides how much engagement you will get, which further decides how influential your posts are.
Because of the Instagram algorithm, your post will initially be visible to only 10 percent of your audience. If it gets a lot of engagement, then it will be visible to the other 90 percent of your audience. If it gets less engagement, you will lose out on it appearing at the top of Instagram feeds.
 
 
One of the main reasons for low engagement is fake or inactive followers, so make sure you first focus on getting a quality audience. Once you have a quality audience, you can start earning money on Instagram in the following ways.
Affiliate marketing can be a good revenue stream once you've got a sizable following. Essentially, it involves partnering with a brand to generate awareness as well as sales in exchange for a commission.
This is usually done via trackable URL or unique promo code that the influencer adds to their posts. You'll earn a commission (anywhere from 5 to 15 percent) for the number of people who use your link to make a purchase.
Considering Instagram doesn't allow you to add links outside your bio, you can focus on only one product at a time. This is why incorporating promo codes in your posts is a good option for Instagram.
Influencer marketing is one of the most popular strategies brands rely on, with 94 percent of marketers finding it effective. Whether you're a macro- or micro-influencer, if you're an expert in your niche, you will be successful.
Brands are always looking to collaborate with Instagrammers of all sizes to deliver their targeted messages to prospective consumers. Sponsored posts can the take the form of a simple brand mention, a product review or even a testimonial.
Most sponsored post deals like these are negotiable and can range from a single post to a complete campaign. When setting your rate, remember that you're not just offering your content to brands. More importantly, you're giving them access to your followers and usage rights too.
By now, you're probably thinking the only way for you to make money on Instagram is to collaborate with brands. But that isn't the case. If you're a product creator, Instagram is a great platform for you to market your products. Your products are an extension of you as a brand, so build a business around them with a focus on your audience.
By selling your own creations on Instagram, you don't need to worry about integrating brand messages into your posts. The only brand you need to worry about is your own. You can incorporate a link to your e-commerce landing page in your bio. Better yet, utilize the Shop Now advertising button that Instagram added to help e-commerce businesses.
You could use print-on-demand services to print and ship merchandise like T-shirts, coffee mugs and wall art. Fashion and health businesses are particularly famous for using Instagram as a marketing platform for their e-commerce stores.
Master & Dynamic is a good example of a store making the most of Instagram to market its audio tools. The link in its bio redirects you to its product catalog.
Building on what we talked about in the previous point, you can use your Instagram account to sell digital products as well. Having established yourself as a subject matter expert, you can market digital resources that your followers might find useful.
From travel guides and e-books to fitness programs, there's a lot you can offer. If people love what you post on Instagram, chances are they'll be willing to pay for more detailed, targeted information. And why not, given the platform has so much to offer? These digital resources are selling well on Instagram, and brands love this concept for obvious reasons.
Digital products are a multibillion-dollar industry, and platforms like Instagram make it simple to market such resources and start earning your share. Whether you have an e-book or an online course, you know where to turn to market and sell your digital products.
Moreover, you can use Instagram to showcase your talents like art, writing and fashion. You could find people interested in hiring you for those skills as opposed to promoting things on your channel.
Take Alex Tooby, for instance. She leverages the platform to market her e-courses and paid training. On offer is a chance to learn how to use Instagram as a marketing platform from the expert herself.
A picture (and sometimes a video in this case) is worth a thousand words. If you're particularly good at using them to tell a story, you can monetize this talent of yours. Leverage your knack for storytelling to help brands write compelling narratives for themselves.
This is different from being a social media consultant. Here, you're the person responsible for creating content for brands to post on their Instagram accounts. Typically, that means you'd avoid posting the same content on your personal account.
Zach Houghton is one such artist adept at weaving thought-provoking tales that he frequently posts on his page. A number of brands often hire him to create narratives for them.
There's a world of opportunities for an Instagram user to earn money by leveraging the platform. Numerous celebrities and influencers, big and small, have used it to establish revenue streams for themselves.
With a dedicated following, you can use Instagram to launch successful business ventures. The special appeal you have can open doors for you. All you have to do is walk through them.

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Daily briefing: How to predict COVID's next move – Nature.com

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NASA’s Curiosity rover used its navigation cameras to capture this panoramic view of Mars’s surface at different times of day. Engineers combined photos from the morning and afternoon on Mars. They then added colours in an artistic re-creation that includes images from the morning scene in blue, the afternoon scene in orange and a combination of both in green.
See more of the month’s sharpest science shots, selected by Nature’s photo team.
Nature | Leisurely scroll
A free, open-source and extensible image viewer for arbitrarily complex (‘n-dimensional’) data fills a gap in the Python scientific ecosystem. napari — whose name refers to a Pacific island village midway between the developers’ bases in San Francisco and Melbourne — features a simple graphical interface with a built-in Python console. Early adopters are using it to streamline everything from visualizing atmospheric jet streams to identifying cells in tissue.
Nature | 4 min read
How SARS-CoV-2 evolves over the next several months and years will determine whether the virus morphs into another common cold — or something more threatening, such as influenza or worse. Scientists are searching for ways to predict the virus’s next moves by looking to other pathogens for clues. They are tracking the effects of the mutations in the variants that have arisen so far, such as Delta and Omicron. And they are warning that letting SARS-CoV-2 spread gives it more opportunities to make significant evolutionary leaps.
Nature | 9 min read
Two new antiviral pills to treat COVID-19 — molnupiravir, developed by Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics, and Pfizer’s paxlovid — were developed in record time. Pfizer’s innovative treatment inhibits an enzyme known as the main protease (Mpro), which is integral to coronavirus replication. “It’s kind of the Achilles heel of the virus,” says antiviral researcher Rolf Hilgenfeld. Merck and Ridgeback focused on the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), which is also targeted by Gilead’s approved drug remdesivir. RdRp is a viral enzyme that synthesizes RNA — both for translation into viral proteins and for generating copies of itself.
Nature Reviews Drug Discovery | 10 min read
Read more: COVID antiviral pills: what scientists still want to know (Nature | 8 min read)
Solar energy is being adopted the world over — but the technologies being installed today might not last, warn four solar-energy scientists and engineers. Today’s sophisticated systems have little room for error, and they face increasingly extreme weather whipped up by climate change. The authors lay out a plan — including quality control, standards and testing — that could save billions of dollars and assure decades of affordable clean electricity to come.
Nature | 7 min read
The remains of hundreds of sailors who died at Pearl Harbor 80 years ago have been returned to their communities thanks to a groundbreaking scientific effort. The unidentified bodies of almost 400 men who perished inside the USS Oklahoma had been interred in mass graves in Hawaii. Identifying them was fiendishly difficult: most were about the same age and height, and many came from similar genetic backgrounds, often sharing mitochondrial DNA from distant maternal ancestors. There were also six sets of siblings and a set of twins. Yet scientists were able to identify over 90% of the men — in one case, returning the remains of three brothers to their only surviving brother.
Politico | 13 min read
Sources: Intakes, Ref. 4; Costs, Ref. 12
As the world population continues to rise, researchers are grappling with the question of what we should eat to stay healthy and save the planet. A 2019 report from a consortium of nutritionists, ecologists and other experts recommended that people adopt a ‘flexitarian’ diet by eating plants on most days and occasionally a small amount of meat or fish. The commission estimates that this diet would save the lives of about 11 million people every year, but others question whether it is practical, affordable and nutritious enough. Scientists are now trying to test environmentally sustainable diets in local contexts, without compromising nutrition or damaging livelihoods. (Nature | 11 min read)
See more of the week’s key infographics, selected by Nature’s news and art teams.
Labour protections and antitrust measures are the most effective way to create a layer of checks and balances on the “whim-driven decisions” of tech billionaires, argues artificial intelligence (AI) researcher Timnit Gebru, the former co-lead of Google’s Ethical AI team. (The Guardian | 5 min read)
doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-021-03670-5
Dare you heed the call to generate an AI artwork based on the title of your thesis? Warning! Some are quite lovely. Some are nightmare fuel.
Help me to generate a daily newsletter based on your wants and needs. Your feedback is always welcome at briefing@nature.com.
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The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK), China
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Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT), University of Luxembourg
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Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT), University of Luxembourg
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Boy, 13, admits boxing club fundraiser scam – Watford Observer

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A 13-year-old boy has admitted pretending to raise funds for a boxing club while intending to pocket the money.
The teenager, who cannot be named for legal reasons, pleaded guilty to falsely claiming to be fundraising for the club with a charity run in Watford, Harpenden and St Albans.
The charges relate to false representations on two dates in February and one in April this year, in which he intended to make money for himself.
He pleaded guilty to committing fraud at West and Central Herts Youth Court on December 1.
The 13-year-old also admitted stealing a pedal cycle in Watford on February 10 this year.
He was referred to a youth offender panel for three months – which will require him to attend meetings during that period.
An order was also made to deprive him of his rights to £157.16 cash.
His guilty plea was taken into account during sentencing, the court heard.
 
 
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How Much Do TikTokers Make? 7 Top Earning TikTokers – GOBankingRates

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Many of the offers appearing on this site are from advertisers from which this website receives compensation for being listed here. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). These offers do not represent all available deposit, investment, loan or credit products.
TikTok has become one of the fastest-growing apps in recent history, crossing over 1 billion active users threshold recently. It was released in 2017 by the Chinese company, ByteDance, which is now valued at $250 billion due to the app’s surge in popularity.
Some of TikTok’s most popular accounts are also enjoying big profits. Smart TikTokers who capitalize on the fact that the average user spends over eight hours every month on the platform can make as much as $5 million per year.
The former U.S. administration wanted to ban TikTok in America out of concerns that the Chinese government could access private user data. To avoid shutting down its business in the country, TikTok is willing to sell the U.S. portion of its business to an American company such as Microsoft, Oracle or Walmart if ByteDance is pressed by the Commerce Department further. In the meantime, there’s money to be made on TikTok. Here’s how.
TikTokers with large followings can make from $200 to $5,000 a month, depending on the size of their following. Those who have do not have over 100,000 followers will not make any money, while those who are over 1 million will make the most. The range of how much TikTokers make will vary due to many factors, including localities and views.

TikTok is all about the 15-second short videos users can create and share. TikTokers who create interesting content, often including dance and music, often get the highest engagement. However, TikTok is more than just a dance and music app — there are accounts that focus on a variety of topics, including personal finance.
TikTok superstars take advantage of their following to get paid to promote other companies and sell their own products. It all depends on your popularity and who your audience is.
Influencer Marketing Hub has an earnings estimator that can roughly calculate how much you can earn on TikTok. According to them, a TikToker can earn between $200 and $20,000 for a branded video. The earnings depend on the number of TikTok followers you have and your engagement rate, meaning how often users interact with your account and like and leave comments on your short videos.
The more followers you have on TikTok, the more you can earn money creating branded clips and sponsored videos. The larger and more active your followers are, the better your chances to hit high-earner status.

There are steps you can take to grow your TikTok follower count. But there’s a caveat — the steps are simple, but the high-earner status doesn’t happen overnight. Growing your TikTok audience takes time, consistency and hard work. Consider these ideas to grow your followers and maximize the money you can make on TikTok:
Decide on what your interests and talents are and what kind of person would like your short videos. There’s a lot of competition on the platform so don’t go too general. You’ll have better chances of growing a following if you focus on a smaller, more specific niche.
Once you know what your niche is, create a profile that resonates with it. Keep your target follower in mind when you’re setting your account up and envision what you should look like from their eyes.
Creating videos that stand out from the crowd is the key to attracting a following. Make sure the videos you’re creating are consistent in style so your following can recognize you. Make your videos interesting to your fan base. A good way is by asking friends or fellow TikTokers to watch and critique your content. Their constructive criticism can give you a different point of view from what you see, or can even point out things you should fix that you may have missed.
Check out the best accounts to help you save money and reach your financial goals!

Keep your audience interested by posting videos regularly. It’s up to you to set up a schedule you can work with — just remember to post fresh clips consistently so your profile doesn’t look abandoned. If you’re worried you’ll get too busy to post regularly, consider setting aside a few hours each week to create a batch of short clips you can post later.
An active profile shows advertisers you’re capable of creating videos that trigger a response from your audience. Once you’re regularly posting unique content that’s geared towards your specialized niche, don’t forget to engage your followers. Run contests, ask your viewers to tag friends in the comments and be sure to reply back to any commenters to keep the conversation going.
Applying these steps helps you grow your TikTok followers and shows companies and potential sponsors that your audience is loyal, engaged and the next lucrative customer base. Once you start getting attention from brands, know your value as a TikToker and price your services accordingly. You may be able to develop your TikTok persona from just a hobby to a side hustle to a full-time business.
The most successful accounts on TikTok right now belong to young females. It makes sense when you consider that one-third of the users on the newer social media platform are teens. Here are the seven highest-earning TikTok stars:
Addison Rae Easterling, known as addisonre is one of the earliest TikTokers. She earns $5 million per year posting short dance clips. Addison is a former competitive dancer who has 76.7 million followers and has received almost five billion likes. Addison created her own cosmetic company, called Item Beauty.
Charli D’Amelio is just 16 years old and earned $4 million, ranking her as the second-highest-earning TikToker. Like Addison Rae, Charli was a competitive dancer who found success on the platform with her dance clips. Charli has a whopping 108.6 million followers. She was recently in the Sabra Hummus Superbowl commercial and even has a Dunkin’ drink, the Charli Cold Foam, named after her.
Dixie D’Amelio is Charli’s sister and has 49.1 million followers.  She earns $2.9 million per year, which is impressive considering she has less than half the number of followers her sister does. While Charli’s meteoric rise on TikTok was because of dancing, Dixie’s success comes from her singing.
Loren Gray was the most-followed account on the short-video-sharing platform until recently. Gray is a singer who signed with Virgin Records in 2018. Gray has 51.3 million followers and often gets over two million likes per video. Her loyal audience is the reason she earns an estimate of $2.6 per year from sponsorships from Revlon, Burger King and Skechers.
Josh Richards is the only male that makes the list of highest-earning TikTok accounts. Josh posts lipsyncing and dancing shorts for his 24.5 million followers. He earns $1.5 million in sponsorships. Josh is a serial entrepreneur. At just 18 years old, he created an energy drink company called Ani Energy, co-founded Talent X, a talent management agency and is an officer at Triller, a TikTok competitor.
Known for his skills as a dancer and choreographer, his TikTok videos have given way to immense popularity on the platform since his beginnings in 2016. Having partnerships with Bang Energy drinks has contributed to his wealth, among many other sponsorships. Having over 4342 million followers, he became one of the highest earners in 2020 and has one of the 15 most-liked TikTok videos of all time.  He is leveraging this popularity over to YouTube, where his content also covers challenge videos, pranks and gaming. He is one of the founders of Shluv House, which stands for “self-love,” where he lives with other social media influencers.
A beatboxer, Spencer X began posting videos on TikTok in early 2019. He had humble beginnings, couch surfing at friends’ homes while making his way through Los Angeles later in 2019. By then, he had gained a following of around 10 million users. Eventually, he gained partnerships with Sony, Uno and Oreo. Since his rise to popularity, he’s no longer needed to couch surf and has developed a popular YouTube channel that has around 2.69 million subscribers. He is now focused on creating his own singles.
Melanie Grafil contributed to the reporting for this article.
This article has been updated on Sep. 28, 2021 to update the number of active users and expand on the TikTok influencer list.
Our in-house research team and on-site financial experts work together to create content that’s accurate, impartial, and up to date. We fact-check every single statistic, quote and fact using trusted primary resources to make sure the information we provide is correct. You can learn more about GOBankingRates’ processes and standards in our editorial policy.

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