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How To Make Money as a Teen in 2021 – GOBankingRates

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If you’re interested in making money as a teen, the competition may not be as stiff as it used to be. A study by the Hamilton Project and Brookings Institution found that only about 35% of teens between the ages of 16 and 19 are employed. The demands of high school don’t leave much room for a part-time job, and summer school enrollment has increased.
If you’re wondering how much you can make as a teen, the federally mandated minimum wage is currently $7.25. However, your state may have a higher minimum wage, and some employers will pay a higher hourly rate than what’s federally required.
But traditional employment isn’t the only route to making some extra cash. You can also get creative and seek out paying opportunities on your own, which could be more lucrative.
If you decide to start your own business, side gig or freelance service, what you earn per hour may be much higher than you could make working for an employer because you can set your own rates. To give you some ideas to help you get started, here’s a list of 20 ways to make money as a teen.

Here’s a wide array of opportunities to make money as a teen. Some are traditional jobs, while others require you to strike out on your own to find work. You’ll find in-person and online options here.
Although many professional tutoring services won’t hire you unless you’re at least 18, that doesn’t mean you can’t look for your own clients. Put up a flyer or spread the word in your neighborhood. As long as you know more than the person you’re tutoring, you can offer your services. Students most often need tutoring in English, math and science, so if you’re a whiz in any of those subjects, you can likely get paid for your knowledge.
If you don’t mind tidying up and cleaning, a job cleaning houses may be the perfect money-maker. Basic housecleaning services include tasks like vacuuming, sweeping and mopping; cleaning countertops and appliance surfaces; cleaning  bathroom surfaces, including the shower and toilet; dusting and emptying the garbage. Start looking in your neighborhood for people who may need your services, such as people who are busy or the elderly.

All you need is a cooler, some bottled water and some ice, which won’t cost much.  For example, you can get a 28-pack of 20-ounce bottled water for about $4 at Walmart. Sell each bottle for $1, and you’ll make around seven times what you initially invested. Good places to sell bottled water are local parks, but check with your local city and county government offices to find out if you need a permit before doing so.
If you have experience walking your own dog, you like dogs and you enjoy spending time outdoors, becoming a dog walker might be an easy way to earn some quick cash. You can start out by asking people you know well to walk their dogs and ask for referrals from there. Be aware that every dog has its own temperament and some dogs are more difficult than others, so don’t be afraid to turn down a walking job if you think there might be trouble. The last thing you want is to have a rambunctious dog break away from you or get into a tangle with another dog while you’re walking it. Last but not least, don’t forget to bring doggy waste bags with you.
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If you happen to have things that other people don’t, but they don’t want to invest the money in buying it, you may be able to rent them out for cash. Perhaps you have a gaming console you don’t really use that much or maybe you have sporting equipment that is gathering dust in the corner of the garage. Decide on a fair rental price and make a deal. Of course, check in with your parents to make sure it’s OK first.
Being a companion to an elderly person can be a very rewarding job, and you may already know someone in your neighborhood who would perfect to approach. While you won’t be qualified to provide any medical care or give medications, you can play board games or cards, tidy up, fix simple meals, run errands or do other tasks around the home to help out.
Camp counselors help supervise campers and often lead small group activities with a focus on fun, safety and etiquette. In the springtime and summer, there are plenty of day camps offered for kids — from coding to karate to math. There are also traditional camps where campers stay at a facility or campground for a period of days or weeks. To work as a camp counselor, you’ll likely have to get certified in first aid and CPR.
Direct sales involves signing up with a company that sells products, such as jewelry, cookware or cosmetics, and often purchasing a starter kit with products you can sell for a profit or commission. While many direct sales opportunities are for people 18 or older, there are a few you can check into, such as GelMoment, which allows you to register as a distributor at age 16 — as long as you have a parent or guardian as a co-applicant.
Flipping items can be an easy way to make a profit and can make a good side hustle. Start by asking friends and family if they have anything that they don’t mind donating to you that they no longer want. It’s OK if the items need a little TLC before they’re ready to sell. You can also go to local garage sales, thrift stores and even check out the “free” section on online marketplaces to find stuff you can flip, like electronics you can easily repair, lawn furniture you can clean up, or furniture that could be made like-new with a fresh coat of paint.
While you will have to be at least 18 to take on this job, and it pays less than the federal minimum wage, it’s a way to make a few extra bucks for gas money or a fast-food run. Check out Humanatic for these opportunities. Humantic requires you to have a PayPal account to work with them, and PayPal requires you to be 18 to have an account Humanatic reviews calls for companies who record their customer service calls. As a call reviewer, you’ll listen to recorded calls and answer a simple question at the end — that’s it.
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If you’re good at creating websites, you can sell your services for around $20 per hour or a flat rate that will adequately compensate you for the time you spend. To get started, make a sample website and approach local businesses to show them what you can do. You can also pitch your service to friends and family members who have small businesses without a website.
While you might not realize it right now, you likely have at least a few items lying around gathering dust that you could sell for cash. If you’re old enough to have social media accounts, you can post your items there. Or you can look into listing your items on mobile selling platforms, like LetGo, which will allow you to use its services as long as you’re at least 14 and you have the permission of your parent or guardian.
If you have a honed skill, like writing, digital animation, graphics design, photography, calligraphy, drawing, you can likely use it to earn money as a freelancer. Fiverr is an online freelance marketplace where you can sign up and create a profile to sell your services to people from all over the world who need them. The best part: As long as you are 13 years old, you can use Fiverr to promote your freelance services.
To make this gig work, you’ll need to spend some time visiting thrift stores and places like Goodwill or the Salvation Army to find vintage clothing and accessories you can resell for a profit.  Consider asking elderly relatives you know to see if they would be willing to part with some of their vintage items to help you get started. Good places to sell vintage clothing and accessories are D-Pop or Etsy.
While you have to be at least 18 to sign up with services like TaskRabbit, you can still look for opportunities on your own to be someone’s personal assistant. Tasks you may be able to handle include office assistance, distributing flyers, organizing files, running errands, data entry, making travel reservations or watering plants.
If you enjoy working with animals, you may find your calling as a kennel attendant. Cleaning and sanitizing kennels will likely be the main tasks. Additional tasks will include feeding, watering and exercising animals, as well as assisting with bathing and grooming them. You may also have to help manage the front desk by taking phone calls and providing in-person customer service for people inquiring about services or those who are dropping off or picking up animals.
While, as a teen, you’re not ready to caddie for a pro golfer on a PGA tour, you may be able to get a job at your local country club or golf course. And you’ll have an advantage if you’ve played golf before. Carrying golf bags and handing the correct golf clubs to golfers are the main duties of a caddie, but you also may have to clean the clubs and balls, measure yardages, rake bunkers and sand traps if a ball lands there and tend pins.
Concession stands are popular in theme parks and at sporting events. As a concession-stand worker, you will take customer orders, ring up transactions, assist with kitchen prep and deliver orders. Be sure to check with your state about getting a food handler’s license or certification.
When summertime rolls around and your local swimming pool opens, you may want to get a job as a lifeguard to help monitor swimmers and ensure they follow the rules and remain safe. Of course, there’s always the chance you may need to perform lifesaving actions, such as if someone is drowning or in distress, so you need to be an excellent swimmer and get certified in AED, CPR and complete any required lifeguard water safety training.
While you might not quite be ready to take on the role of a daycare teacher as a teen, you can apply to be a daycare assistant. As an assistant, you’ll help with tasks such as cleaning and sanitizing, teaching simple skills, monitoring children while they are eating and taking naps and assisting with toileting and hygiene as needed.
While you generally have to be at least 14 to be employed, that doesn’t mean finding a job will be easy. Older teens, especially those with experience, will likely have an advantage when it comes to getting teen-related jobs.
If you’re younger, your best bet is to start by doing paid tasks for friends, family members and people in your neighborhood and ask them to refer you to others. If you prove yourself as a reliable and trustworthy worker, there’s a good chance you’ll soon have more offers for work than you can handle. If you’re an older teen, you’ll have the advantage of additional opportunities, especially if you have a special skill or previous work experience.
Put your best foot forward when filling out job applications and attending interviews to make a shining first impression. And once you have a job, do your very best so that your supervisor will be willing to promote you or give you a good reference when you move on to another job.
Methodology: Average hourly pay, when applicable, was sourced for all jobs from PayScale, except for dog walker, which was sourced from Zippia. 
Our in-house research team and on-site financial experts work together to create content that’s accurate, impartial, and up to date. We fact-check every single statistic, quote and fact using trusted primary resources to make sure the information we provide is correct. You can learn more about GOBankingRates’ processes and standards in our editorial policy.

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5 education issues to watch as Tennessee lawmakers return – Chalkbeat Tennessee

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One year after tackling pandemic-related school challenges during a special legislative session called by Gov. Bill Lee, Tennessee lawmakers return to the Capitol this week with another major focus on students: how to fund public education.
Lee wants to overhaul the 30-year-old formula that determines how much money the state distributes to school systems, as well as how much local governmental agencies should contribute. He’s expected to work with fellow GOP leaders to offer a legislative proposal this month.
But some say the legislature shouldn’t rush that discussion, especially since it took years to come up with the current formula known as the Basic Education Program, or BEP.
“It’s OK to hold this and keep working on it if we need to,” said Rep. Scott Cepicky, a Republican from Maury County. “Let’s get this right.”
Lawmakers also aren’t inclined toward a lengthy session during an election year. They’ll look to pass a budget and wrap up by mid-April, if possible, so they can return home to campaign.
Until then, here are five issues to watch:
Since October when Lee called for a review of the state’s funding formula, Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn has spearheaded the process that included eight town halls and dozens of meetings with policymakers and education leaders.
Last week, she called the issue “the biggest policy decision we make” and said Tennessee should seize this “moment in time.” She also hinted a draft proposal will be unveiled early this week.
“There is funding that is potentially available, there is momentum. We see need across the state,” she told a forum hosted by Tennesseans for Quality Early Education.
The review, which aims to shift Tennessee to a more student-centered funding approach, has drawn public praise but generated private concerns about its intent. Many public school advocates worry the goal is to pave the way for a new private school voucher program halted by ongoing litigation, though the governor has denied that.
“I’m trying to keep an open mind and not draw conclusions before getting all the information,” said Sen. Ferrell Haile, a Gallatin Republican who is on Lee’s 12-member review committee to create a new strategy.
Schwinn said any future formula must factor in the needs of individual children. That includes students who have disabilities, are English language learners, or come from low-income families.
Currently, enrollment is the main component of the BEP, a formula with 46 components that determine how much school systems receive to pay for teacher salaries and other needs like textbooks, technology, and bus transportation. But districts have flexibility on how to spend that money, which explains why the BEP is considered a funding formula, not a spending plan.
“We want to put more money into education, but we want to make sure the money is being spent well,” said Rep. Mark White, a Memphis Republican who chairs a House education committee and supports forging a new formula this year. “Let’s give it our best shot.”
Whether the state revises its funding formula this year or not, the legislature must pass a budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1 — and is flush with cash. Tax collections during the pandemic’s economic rebound were higher than projected. The state also is sitting on hundreds of millions of dollars in federal grants intended to help working low-income families.
Meanwhile, Tennessee ranks 44th in the nation for student funding, according to the Education Law Center, which gave the state Fs last year for its funding level and funding effort.
The state’s BEP review committee, an influential panel of policymakers and education leaders, has urged the governor to prioritize more funding for school nurses and counselors to get Tennessee to nationally recommended ratios. A $110-million annual investment would fund 1 nurse for every 750 students instead of the current 1:3,000, and 1 counselor for every 250 students instead of the current ratios of 1:500 and 1:350 for elementary and secondary schools, respectively.
In addition to perennial discussions about raising teacher pay, there’s talk about expanding Tennessee’s pre-K program, which serves a fifth of the state’s 4-year-olds. Most districts have waiting lists.
During the pandemic, consensus has grown that pre-K and early grades are the best places for impactful interventions to address learning lag and social-emotional challenges.
“It’s a timely topic that is deserving of deep discussions,” Haile said.
A controversial proposal to limit which supplemental materials teachers can use advanced last year in two House panels before stalling in the Senate Education Committee.
Sen. Janice Bowling, a Republican from Tullahoma, promised to bring her bill back for consideration this year and address worries that “good” materials from organizations like the Tennessee Farm Bureau could be excluded.
The bill, co-sponsored by Rep. Terri Lynn Weaver of Lancaster, would prohibit teachers from using materials that supplant state-approved textbooks unless district leaders approve those materials in advance. Any approved print or electronic materials would be listed on district websites.
“We absolutely need to do something,” agreed Sen. Brian Kelsey, a Republican from Germantown, “but we need to do it in a way that doesn’t have unintended consequences.”
The president of the state’s largest teachers organization called the proposal “demoralizing” for teachers and logistically impossible for school districts. For instance, a teacher couldn’t use yesterday’s newspaper in a current events class.
“This is a move toward completely scripted lessons,” said Beth Brown of the Tennessee Education Association, noting that a new Tennessee law already restricts what teachers can discuss in their classes about racism, white privilege, and unconscious bias.
State testing went well last year, with a 95% participation rate despite the pandemic. But lawmakers are still expected to bring several proposals to change when and how tests are administered.
Expect one proposal to require that testing occur during the last 20 days of the school year, instead of the earlier testing window set by the education department.
“That’s going to give our teachers an extra 30 days of instruction time, which is a lot,” said Cepicky.
Other likely legislation would require students in grades 3-8 to continue testing on paper, while local school systems could opt to move students in higher grades to online exams.
This school year, Tennessee high schoolers are taking their exams online under the state’s plan to transition back to computerized testing after several years of technical snafus.
Should teachers be judged on how much their students know — or how much they grow?
Tennessee has mostly focused on the latter when evaluating their educators and schools through an academic growth model that measures learning over time, regardless of whether students are proficient.
But the complexity and opaqueness of the state’s statistical growth method, combined with increasing frustration over low student proficiency, could renew that debate among lawmakers this year.
“We’ve been doing this for 10 years, and where are we?” asked Cepicky, complaining that only a third of the state’s third graders are reading on grade level.
“Meanwhile, we’ve created an evaluation system where a teacher can get an A in academic growth even if their students aren’t proficient readers. We’ve got to get that commitment back to getting our kids proficient,” he said.
Such a move would mark a dramatic change for Tennessee, considered a pioneer in using “value-added” measurements to judge teachers and schools. For a decade, the guiding principle has been that all students can advance, regardless of out-of-school factors like poverty that might hold them back.
Other issues are sure to surface before this year’s legislature, including more funding for charter school facilities and how to address the state’s worsening teacher shortage. The statistics on the teacher supply is especially troubling, with thousands of Tennessee educators expected to retire by 2024 and fewer candidates entering teacher training programs.
“We’ve got to be creating multiple pathways to teaching in our state, and we’ve got to have a competitive wage,” said JC Bowman, executive director of Professional Educators of Tennessee.
The 2022 session of the 112th General Assembly convenes at noon Central Time on Tuesday. Visit the legislature’s website to track legislation, livestream meetings, and contact legislators.
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Made a Lot of Money in the Stock Market This Year? Here's How to Lower Your Capital Gains Taxes. – The Motley Fool

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Returns as of 01/18/2022
Returns as of 01/18/2022
Founded in 1993 by brothers Tom and David Gardner, The Motley Fool helps millions of people attain financial freedom through our website, podcasts, books, newspaper column, radio show, and premium investing services.
Despite recent volatility, it’s been a pretty strong year for the stock market. And at this point, you may be sitting on gains in your portfolio, at least on paper. If you’re eager to sell some stocks at a profit and make those gains official, you should know that doing so could raise your tax bill significantly.
Whenever you sell investments at a profit, you’re required to pay capital gains taxes, the amount of which will hinge on how long you hold those stocks prior to unloading them. If you keep your stocks for a year or less before selling them, you’ll be subject to short-term capital gains, which are taxed the same way as ordinary income. If you hold your stocks for at least a year and a day before selling, you’ll be bumped into the more favorable long-term capital gains category.
But either way, capital gains could cause you to owe the IRS quite a bit of money. And so if you’re looking at a big profit this year, there’s one move it pays to make.
Image source: Getty Images.
Your goal as an investor is no doubt to buy stocks that make you money. But sometimes, that doesn’t happen.
When you get stuck holding stocks that are underperforming, sometimes, selling them at a loss is your best option. But the good news is that taking a loss in your portfolio is a great way to minimize the hit of capital gains taxes.
Say you’re sitting on $10,000 in capital gains this year. If you take a $10,000 loss in your portfolio, you’ll cancel out the capital gains taxes you owe. And, just as importantly, you’ll free up money you can use to invest in different stocks — ones that may perform much better or lend to more diversity in your portfolio.
Now you may end up with capital losses that exceed your gains for the year. But that’s OK, because you can use some of that excess loss to offset ordinary income — up to $3,000 worth, in fact.
So, say you take a $10,000 loss in your portfolio but you only have a $7,000 gain this year. In that case, you’ll still get to use your entire loss for the current tax year.
But even if that’s not the case — say, you have a $10,000 loss and only a $6,000 gain — you can carry the remainder of your loss into future tax years and use it to offset your tax bill at the time. So for example, in this scenario, you’d carry $1,000 of your loss into 2022 and potentially use it then.
Making money on stocks is a good thing, but only if it doesn’t cause a huge tax crunch for you. If you’ve profited nicely in 2021, it pays to see if there are losing stocks in your portfolio worth selling. Doing so could really help minimize this year’s tax burden, not to mention set you up with more money to invest with in 2022.

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HOD tackles license portability, policy changes – American Veterinary Medical Association

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The AVMA House of Delegates (HOD) took on issues such as veterinary license portability across states and policy changes at a weekend meeting held January 7-8, during the Association’s annual Veterinary Leadership Conference.
The House’s Veterinary Information Forum addressed ways to make it easier for veterinarians licensed in one state to gain licenses in other states, as well as how to increase support for veterinary team members. During its regular business meeting, the House approved a new policy supporting collection of antimicrobial use data as well as updates to the AVMA policies on rabies and rabies vaccination waivers.
The AVMA News team reported on all of the HOD actions in articles published shortly after the meeting concluded. These are available for all in the profession to read online:
The House also said farewell to four colleagues for whom the weekend meeting was their last one as members of the House of Delegates. Please join in congratulating and thanking these volunteers retiring from the House of Delegates. Those retiring, their affiliation, and years of service were:
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