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How to make money through alternatives to stock photography – Amateur Photographer

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Stock photography has long played an important role in photographers’ revenue streams thanks to its ability to generate passive income from images. But where the stock industry was once lucrative to the point where some photographers could make a comfortable living from stock photography alone, this is unfortunately no longer the case.
Digital photography and the ability for almost anyone to sign-up to some stock libraries have flooded the market with images, which has in part driven down the royalties photographers receive; it’s a simple case of supply and demand.
But that’s not to say that the larger libraries such as Adobe Stock, Alamy, iStock, Getty, Shutterstock and many more are redundant since they can all provide that all-important passive income, albeit a modest one.
Behind the scenes Sony Alpa A7RIII and Vanguard Alta Pro 2+ 263 CT. Credit: James Abbott
So, while you may not make a fortune from using one or more of these larger libraries to license your images, it’s still worth considering them because they can provide an additional revenue stream regardless of how profitable. You just have to consider the amount of work involved in preparing, uploading and keywording images against the potential income their sales will generate.
There are also other ways to license and sell your images, and that’s what we’re going to concentrate on here with four approaches to licensing and selling images in both digital and physical formats using alternative approaches to the traditional stock model.
The advantage of these is that you have control over pricing and the images you can sell, not to mention the opportunity to generate a much higher level of income from your photography.
www.picfair.com
Picfair is a stock photography disruptor that puts photographers of all levels in much greater control over image pricing when selling their images as either digital downloads or prints. All you have to do to get started is to sign up to the website, upload your images, set your price and you can then sell your images through your personal store on Picfair as well as through the Central Marketplace.
Setting up an account is incredibly easy, and you can opt for the free account, pay £69.90 for an annual subscription to Picfair Plus or sign-up for a monthly subscription for £7 per month.
The free account is limited to 50 images with basic functionality that’s more than enough to get started, but if you’d like more control over the look and feel of your personal store, enjoy additional functionality, unlimited uploads, zero commission and much more, Picfair Plus is for you. You could always get started with the free account and upgrade once you’ve got to grips with the platform.
With this website, the photographer sets the price that they would like to receive for each image sold regardless of the account type they hold, while Picfair adds a 20% commission to this price for free accounts.
So, an image where the photographer has set the price to £20 will sell for £24, while no commission is added to Picfair Plus accounts so that image would sell for £20 or another price set by the photographer. Funds from sales will then be paid by BACS (UK only) or to your PayPal account – it’s really that simple.
Images can be purchased as digital downloads with licenses for editorial and personal uses, commercial uses and advertising uses. Each of these is on a sliding price scale with advertising usage providing the highest revenue for the photographer. Buyers can also purchase prints, framed prints and canvas wraps with fulfilment handled by Picfair so you can sit back and relax.
www.smugmug.com
If you’d like full control over image sales, whether digital downloads or prints, framed prints and other traditional print options, SmugMug is a great option because it allows you to incorporate these selling options into your SmugMug website.
SmugMug is a website and hosting company whose e-commerce solutions are aimed primarily at professional photographers, which is reflected in the price for the two plans where this functionality is available.
To sell images as digital downloads with either a personal or commercial license, or to sell prints etc. you’ll need to sign-up for the Portfolio or Pro accounts; Portfolio costs $32 per month or $240 annually, while Pro costs $50 per month or $432 annually, which means you need to be selling a lot of images to make the investment worthwhile.
However, this does include your website and hosting, excluding your URL cost, so it may not be a great deal more expensive than the website service you already use or are considering.
When it comes to selling downloads, these are set up by you and the process is quite simple with plenty of guides available. Fees are attached to this service but they are low and can be viewed in the Help sections of the SmugMug website.
Selling prints is just as easy, with fulfilment in the UK and EU provided by Loxley Colour, with several other options available in the US. You can even order test prints to check the print quality of the different labs.
The SmugMug option is the ultimate in control because you host all sales within your own website and set your prices while SmugMug takes care of payment handling and print fulfilment through its reputable partner labs.
You receive 85% of the difference between your price and SmugMug’s default print prices with the 15% retained by SmugMug paying for credit card payment fees, customer service and administration.
www.creativemarket.com
Creative Market is one of the lesser-known options here and is primarily a website for selling digital design downloads such as graphics, fonts, design templates, Photoshop Actions and much more, with photo downloads and licensing being one of the options.
Physical print options are, however, not available because the emphasis here is digital downloads so it’s not as comprehensive as other options covered here.
With this website, you create a store, upload your images, set the prices and you’re now selling your images online. Creative Market then offers three licenses to buyers – Personal Only, Commercial and Extended Commercial with the ability for buyers to contact Creative Market for additional premium usage options.
These licenses provide a sliding scale of cost, with Extended Commercial being the most expensive if not counting premium usage where prices aren’t listed.
The beauty of this site is that it takes care of payments and sales tax for you, which can be a headache when selling digital products to EU countries because of the different rates of VAT in member states.
But since the website is based in the United States, you need to fill in a tax form to avoid paying unnecessary US taxes if based outside of the country and this can be done through the website itself. You are, of course, still liable for income tax in the UK and must declare your earnings as with all of the options we’ve covered here.
Payments are available to be requested once you’ve reached the minimum threshold of $20, and payments are made on a set date each month to your nominated PayPal account. Use of Creative Market is free, but each sale you make is subject to a 30% commission that goes to the website and is automatically deducted from your sales.
This can be offset against the amount you sell your images for, but prices here are generally lower than Picfair, for instance, so you wouldn’t want to make your prices too high to remain competitive.
www.fineartamerica.com
Throwing something of a curveball into the mix, Fine Art America is a website that’s primarily aimed at selling a wide range of physical products featuring your photos.
These range from traditional print options such as canvases and framed prints, to products such as bags and phone cases featuring your images – the full range of products is simply too large to list.
Plus, you can also license royalty-free and rights-managed digital downloads of your images, although the website is best known for its print-based offerings.
Creating an account, uploading your images and setting your profit on top of the production costs of the products is quick and easy, and with the free account you can upload up to 25 images.
The Premium Membership only costs $30 per year and provides unlimited uploads, the ability to sell your Fine Art America products on your website, provides a personal website if you don’t have one and you can send up to 10,000 marketing emails at a time. It’s a small price to pay for unlimited uploads and being able to copy and paste code into your existing website to sell products.
For physical products, Fine Art America has 16 manufacturing facilities in five countries around the world, meaning your work is accessible to the global market.
When it comes to digital downloads and licensing, you can set any of your images to be sold this way with the ability to sell royalty-free and rights-managed digital downloads, as well as being able to set up custom licenses for more specific uses with time limitations. For downloads, you set the price and Fine Art America adds a 30% commission on top.
The website is also a little like Flickr in that you can join groups, enter challenges and comment on other photographers’ images. So while it’s primarily a platform for selling photography products, there’s also a vibrant community that you can take part in.
Philip Mowbray, content manager at Picfair (www.picfair.com) is an expert on all things stock photography and shares his top ten tips to help you to increase your chances of selling more images using online hosting services.
Keep editing to a minimum because buyers often apply their own adjustments to images to fit in-house styles. Any significant adjustments to a photo, especially those that render the image unrealistic, will restrict its use. So, when editing images for selling online, less is much more.
Editorial customers often overlay text on images (eg. magazines and book covers) in areas such as sky, sea, grass or anywhere with a solid block of colour that isn’t too busy. Including space for text within your images will give them added value and ultimately much greater sales potential.
The landscape of image buying has changed dramatically over the past ten years and buyers often use social media to discover images. We find that photographers who are the most active on social media, linking and promoting their Picfair Stores, have increased success with selling their images.
If a photographer’s work caters to a specific niche or industry, they should research and reach out to any relevant companies or contacts with a link to their images. This could be as simple as sending a quick email to an editor or manager to introduce themselves and their photography.
Think like a buyer and include keywords that accurately describe the image and are likely to be used as search terms; an image might be an ideal fit for a buyer, but it needs the right keywords to be discoverable. Avoid using irrelevant keywords because this type of spamming annoys buyers.
James Abbott Photography shooting at Stanage Edge in the Peak District. Credit: James Abbott
Location information can have a significant influence on whether an image is purchased or not. Buyers often need clarity on where a photo was taken, especially for location-specific creative briefs and editorial features so providing this information is an effortless way to help your images sell.
Concentrate on developing a unique style and mastering a specific genre, rather than recreating the same generic images as other photographers. Photographers who stand out from the crowd with a more unique and identifiable style are generally more successful in the long run.
Always follow the upload requirements of the hosting site. Any rules on what you can or cannot upload are there for a reason and ultimately to help you sell images and increase your chances of success. Attempting to bypass them will result in rejected images, disappointment and wasted time.
Many photography blogs and image hosting sites will send regular emails to their photographer community; make sure you subscribe and absorb their advice. They’ll usually cover topics such as trends, what’s been popular on the platform and general tips for improving your images.
At Picfair, as with many other online hosting services, photographers are free to set their prices for their images. Prices vary, but we find that there’s a sweet spot between £10-£25 for an editorial/commercial licence or to purchase a print (excluding production and shipping).
In stock photography, this is a licence that allows a single use of an image as outlined by the licence. The buyer can choose an exclusive licence which means additional licences won’t be sold within a set timeframe, but this is more expensive. Non-exclusive means that further licences can be sold.
Royalty-free images are anything but free – the buyer still has to pay for a licence to use, but usage is much more open than rights managed. With this non-exclusive licence, that the image can be used multiple times for different uses for the initial price that’s paid for the licence.
Commercial use refers to images that are used to sell a product or service. These images require model and property releases, while logos, brand names and recognisable products should be avoided when shooting because these can be problematic and could lead to lost sales or hours of retouching.
Images depicting people or private property that don’t have model releases can be used editorially in magazines, newspapers and textbooks etc. to illustrate a story or idea, but they can’t be used commercially to sell a product or service, for instance.
For images depicting people or private property, you must have a model release or property release for images to be used commercially to sell a product or service. Even if you photograph a friend or family member with the intention of using the images commercially, you still need a model release.
Further reading
How to make money from your old photos
Is stock photography still worth anything?
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One-Third of People Have $100 or Less in Their Checking Accounts, Survey Shows — Here's How Much Experts Say You Should Actually Have – GOBankingRates

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Checking accounts are the bedrock of personal finance in the United States. According to a recent GOBankingRates survey of more than 1,300 adults from all over the country, more than 95% of America has a checking account, the highest percentage among all account types. However, more than one-third of those surveyed say they barely keep any money in checking at all. 
Read More: Gen Z and Millennials Favor National and Online Banks, Survey Shows — What Does That Mean for the Future of Credit Unions?
See: GOBankingRates’ Best Online Banks of 2022
GOBankingRates talked to experts who were stunned by the study’s findings, as well as some who thought it sounded just about right. Here’s what money professionals think is the appropriate amount of cash to keep liquid and at the ready in a checking account.  
GOBankingRates’ Top Picks: Best Savings Account of 2022

The study found that 35% of the country — more than 1 in 3 Americans — keep less than $100 in their checking accounts at any given time. For context, consider that the next-biggest groups — the 18% who have balances of either $101-$500 or $501-$1,000 — were only about half as big. 
For about 11% of the country, the magic number falls between $1,001 and $1,500. A little less than 6% have up to $2,000 in checking and about 13% keep more than $2,000. 
If you think that a double-digit account balance for one-third of the country sounds insufficient, you’re in good company. 
“It honestly surprises me that the number is so low,” said Julie Ramhold, consumer analyst with DealNews.com. “I would expect many to be putting the bulk of their income into a checking account still.” 
So, if $99 or less is low, where is the sweet spot? 
“The short answer is that most experts advise keeping one to two months worth of living expenses in your checking account,” Ramhold said. “It’s also good to pad out that number with an extra 25% to 30% of your monthly living expenses as an extra cushion.” 
Boost Your Finances: 7 Simple Habits That Will Make You Richer in 2022
Not all experts were shocked by the study’s findings — in fact, at least one thinks the results are right on the money. 
“I keep less than $100 in my checking account for several reasons,” said Wendy Barlin, CPA. 
The first argument in favor of an ultra-low balance is that checking accounts earn zero interest or, in the best of cases, close to it — but Barlin cited another point that’s equally convincing. 
“Checking accounts are linked to debit cards, which are the biggest fraud problem,” Barlin said. “I don’t want someone taking money out of my checking account. I keep all my money in a savings or money market account.”
It is, after all, much easier to get credit card companies to reverse fraudulent charges than it is to get banks to return cash. 
Find Out: How To Compound Your Income in 2022
As you can see, the spectrum is so broad that it ranges from $99 to two months worth of living expenses plus 30% — and that’s after speaking to only two experts. Some said you should have up to six months on hand. 
A consensus is elusive, of course, because everyone’s life and financial footprint are unique.  
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“How much you should keep in your checking account depends on various factors, such as your income and expected expenses, recurring bill payments and cash withdrawals,” said Laura Adams, MBA, a personal finance expert with Finder.com
Another reason that the “right amount” is so hard to nail down has to do with the transitory nature of money held in checking accounts. Checking accounts are a temporary way station for money that will be redirected to pay credit card bills, fund investment accounts and IRAs, and settle up for the month with the mortgage lender.
“Most people deposit income into their checking and make disbursements from that central account for everyday expenses and savings,” Adams said.
One school of thought says that the right amount is whatever you need to cover your expenses — and not much else. Whatever’s left over, after all, could be put to better use elsewhere.
“Since interest earnings on bank accounts are typically a fraction of 1%, keeping large sums in a checking account isn’t a wise option,” Adams said. “Moving excess money into higher-yield savings allows you to earn more interest and maintain a separate fund for emergencies.”
There’s even an argument to be made for putting that money in an index fund since savings yields aren’t much better than checking yields, but if you are a checking account minimalist, remember that it’s better to have a little too much money than not enough. 
Keep Reading: Here’s How Much You Need To Earn To Be ‘Rich’ in Every State
While you don’t want too much money idling in checking when it could be earning you money somewhere else, a healthy cushion of cash is an absolute must if you want to avoid the significant penalties that come with maintaining an underfunded checking account. 
“As a general rule of thumb, your goal should be to maintain a balance that helps you to avoid the risk of becoming overdrawn or incurring bank fees,” said Maxim Manturov, head of investment research at Freedom Finance Europe, a subdivision of Nasdaq-traded Freedom Holding Corp. “With this in mind, your account should never drop below your minimum required balance, so it’s important to consider your expenses accordingly, as well as your general monthly outflow.” 
It’s likely that part of the reason people keep so little money in their checking accounts today is that low balances aren’t as dangerous as they once were. Most banks let you transfer money instantly from savings to checking if things get tight — even after hours — or you can set up overdraft protection that moves money automatically from savings to checking to cover a debit in progress. Those are all incredibly helpful tools that would have seemed like magic a generation ago to anyone who ever wrote a check that they didn’t realize they couldn’t cover. 
But unlike checking accounts, the money you put in savings was not designed to be transitory. That money is supposed to stay put, and if you overuse your savings account as a backstop to your checking account, you’ll start incurring penalties. That’s because Federal Reserve Board Regulation D forbids you from making more than six withdrawals from a savings account per month.
For Your Financial Future: $1M Is No Longer the Standard Nest Egg – Here’s How Much Most Americans Think You Actually Need To Retire
In the GOBankingRates survey, the oldest Americans — those ages 65 and up — were far more likely to have larger balances in their checking accounts and far less likely to have low balances than all other age groups, with younger sets trending farthest in the other direction. 
It’s not only because 20-somethings tend to have less money than their elders — technology has forced a generational divide in banking habits and attitudes. 
In a world of crypto wallets and Venmo, paper checks — and the accounts they’re linked to — have taken on a very 20th-century feel. Many young people have never written a check and have certainly never used longhand arithmetic to balance a checkbook, which is by now the financial equivalent of cursive. 
Older people tend to favor the security of having plenty of cash “on hand” in their checking accounts, while younger generations tend to view all their money as being on hand all the time. With 24/7 access to PayPal, p2p payments, buy now, pay later purchasing options, and nearly instant transfers from brokerages to banks, why should they fret about the balance in their checking accounts?
“In the height of the information age, people are getting smarter about personal financial wellness,” said James Dunavant, CEO of the personal finance platform Tend. “Naturally, their preferences are also shifting toward more transparent platforms that offer faster, simpler and more personalized services. Rather than keeping their money in a checking account, consumers are exploring other options that provide greater benefits, whether it’s increased convenience, speedier processing, more rewards or fewer hidden fees. The next generation, in particular, has a deeper understanding of the wide breadth of financial tools that are available to them, and they’re willing to do the extra research to move their money into the best money management services, platforms and apps that make sense for their individual needs and goals.”
More From GOBankingRates
Methodology: GOBankingRates surveyed 1,335 Americans aged 18 and older from across the country on between December 1 and 3, 2021, asking twelve different questions: (1) What category does your current financial institution fall under?; (2) Have you considered changing Banks within the past year?; (3) If you have considered changing banks in the past year, were any of the following factors? (select all that apply):; (4) Which feature, perk, or other offering is most important to you when opening an account with a new institution?; (5) Are you currently satisfied with all your banking products and services offered by your Bank/Credit Union?; (6) Would you ever have different types of accounts across multiple banks? (i.e. Checking at Chase, but Savings at TD Bank); (7) What is your most preferred method of banking?; (8) Which of the following is the biggest factor of you staying with your current bank?; (9) Which of the following bank accounts do you currently use/have open? (Select all that apply); (10) How much is the minimum balance you keep in your Checking Account?; (11) How much do you currently have in your Savings Account?; and (12) If you are in a relationship or married do you share bank account(s) with your partner? All respondents had to pass a screener question of: Are you currently a member of a Bank (online included) or Credit Union?, with an answer of “Yes”. GOBankingRates used PureSpectrum’s survey platform to conduct the poll.

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How To Make Money Online: 11 Proven Ways for 2021 – GOBankingRates

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Many of the offers appearing on this site are from advertisers from which this website receives compensation for being listed here. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). These offers do not represent all available deposit, investment, loan or credit products.
Remote work isn’t new. As many as one-fourth of Americans worked a few hours from home even before the shutdowns that occurred due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, in the digital era, more money-making opportunities are available than ever before. You can earn money online without working around the clock — or leaving the house at all.
Plus, working online can have benefits that a traditional 9-to-5 job doesn’t have, such as extreme flexibility, passive income and even total financial freedom.
Are you feeling motivated yet? If so, check out these great ideas for how to make money online from home.
If you’re going to take the leap into the digital workspace, choose work that aligns with your goals. Fortunately, you have plenty of options — from selling your photos to teaching peers — to earn money online and boost your savings.
A growing number of companies are hiring remote workers. It’s also possible to be your own boss and work as a consultant or freelancer. Here are a few examples of full- and part-time jobs that let you earn money from home.
If you have a passion for writing, you might be able to make money online in 2021 by writing content for blogs or websites. Many companies offer assignments to aspiring and experienced writers alike.
Freelance sites, such as the popular Upwork, often have jobs available for virtual assistants, bookkeepers, web designers and more. Demand for freelancers increased dramatically during the COVID-19 lockdowns. According to Freelancer’s “Fast 50” report, job postings on its site increased by 41% in the second quarter of 2020 — compared to the same quarter in 2019.
If you design a wildly popular app, you might be able to generate significant income. You can earn money by charging for the app, displaying in-app ads or charging for in-app features and upgrades.
Americans own more smartphones than computers. Moreover, the number of Americans who rely on their smartphones is expected to increase. This also increases the demand for new apps, so you can make money online with a smartphone while using your smartphone.
If you have an interest in web development, take advantage of the demand for designers to build sites for businesses or organizations. Most graphic designers have a bachelor’s degree. Knowledge of design, computer graphics and design software are necessary.
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Sites such as Upwork are a good place to start for finding clients and building your portfolio.
If you have in-depth expertise about a specific subject, you could create digital media products to sell your knowledge and skills to others. Choose the format that best suits your audience and skill set, and then start producing.
If you have a story to tell or special knowledge to share, record it in a podcast. Podcasts are surprisingly simple to create and cost significantly less to produce than other digital media. The one drawback, however, is the ease of entry, which can lead to overcrowding in the marketplace.
Sites such as Adobe Stock and Shutterstock allow you to contribute your prized photography in addition to other media, which can generate royalties from each sale. Best of all, you retain all of the rights to your photos. You can use them in your own work or promote them on other sites.
The trends for photography in 2021 call for pictures that tell an emotional story, return to nature or exhibit “realness,” Shutterstock reported.
Every day, get fresh ideas on how to save and make money and achieve your financial goals.

The internet makes it easier to match people in need with those who offer in-demand services. Platforms such as Fiverr and Care.com — and even online classifieds listings like Craigslist — give you a place to advertise.
Some services, like tutoring, can be done over the internet. Others, like food delivery, take place in the real world. Here are a few examples of each.
Medical transcriptions provide a valuable service to healthcare providers. They listen to recorded notes from doctors and other practitioners and type them into reports. It’s a great option for working at home on your own time.
Pizza delivery has been a staple part-time job for years. Now food delivery apps like DoorDash and Grubhub have expanded the concept to restaurants of all types. All you need is a reliable vehicle and working GPS to find your way around town.
You’ll work when restaurants are busy, mostly during lunch and dinner times.
If you have a smartphone, there are options to earn money from an app in 2021. Some of the top apps include cash-back services and mobile listing sites. Best of all, you can do this work wherever you are.
Selling secondhand clothing on apps has been so successful that it now has its own name: recommerce. Start by cleaning out your closet. Then browse yard sales, clearance racks and local thrift stores for pieces to sell for a profit in your fashionable side hustle.
This is one of the easiest ways to earn $100 quickly. You just need in-demand products that are priced to sell.
You can do more than market products and services online. It’s also possible to earn money on a website in 2021, especially if you use a website to sell merchandise or set appointments for services. These are some of the best ways to earn money online.
If you have an artistic side, consider selling handcrafted items on Etsy or another site to make money off your hobby. Some of the trending items on the platform include products that support specific communities, home goods, self-care and activities.
Create online video courses and earn money from students. For example, you can teach students how to play the ukulele, meditate or use a software program. Online platforms, such as Udemy, help aspiring teachers find paying students, mostly adults and professionals, in their chosen disciplines. A second site, Outschool, is for students up to age 18.
On Udemy, U.S. course prices start at $9.99 for students. Instructors earn between 37% and 97% of the revenue share. At Outschool, the teachers set the price for their courses, and the site takes a 30% service fee.
Selling graphic T-shirts is a big business. Sites such as Teespring, allow you to design and sell these shirts for a profit. You can increase your profit margin through Teespring’s pricing discount, which triggers as you sell more and more shirts.
There’s a growing demand for customized T-shirts. Companies use them to increase brand awareness among their target market. Custom T-shirts also meet a need in the fashion industry among consumers striving to show support for a cause.
When you first start out seeking online opportunities, you simply might be looking for how to make money online. But a few gigs here and there won’t give you a sustainable stream of income.
The best way to earn money online is to find a way you can support, sustain and scale your services or products over time. For many companies, the ultimate measure of success is giving customers what they want. As long as you meet a need, you will get customers. And some of those customers will give you repeat business and even referrals, which will help you grow your client base.
Jami Farkas, Taylor Bell, Grace Lin and Bill Pirriglia contributed to the reporting for this article.
This article has been updated with additional reporting since its original publication.
Our in-house research team and on-site financial experts work together to create content that’s accurate, impartial, and up to date. We fact-check every single statistic, quote and fact using trusted primary resources to make sure the information we provide is correct. You can learn more about GOBankingRates’ processes and standards in our editorial policy.

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Northants teenager with cancer thanks those who donated to fundraiser set up by best friend – Northampton Chronicle and Echo

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A fundraiser has been set up for a 19-year-old Northamptonshire woman whose cancer grew over Christmas, leaving her bed bound for her birthday.
At this time last year, Yami Moloteni, 19, was complaining of chest pains to her GP and she was told that it was likely she was suffering from long Covid. She was advised to take ibuprofen and assured that she would feel better soon. This was not the case.
Fast forward to June, just two days after being dismissed by another GP, she was rushed to A&E at Northampton General Hospital by her mum with a ‘massive’ pain in her chest.
She remained in hospital for two weeks and then a further eight days at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford as doctors scratched their heads, trying to figure out what was wrong.
A-Level results day in August loomed but Yami would not only be receiving her exam marks that day. A PET scan revealed she had stage two Hodgkin Lymphoma – an uncommon cancer that develops in the lymphatic system, which is a network of vessels and glands spread throughout the body.
Yami said: “I already knew that it was cancer but I thought I could still go to university so the results day came around and they said there is no chance of you going to university this year. It was horrible because all my friends were like, ‘I’m going to university’ and I was like, ‘I’m going to hospital.'”
Yami had to defer her university course for a year and now she has to routinely travel to Oxford for treatment. Her chemotherapy started in September 2021, which caused her long waist-length hair to start coming out in ‘clumps.’
Her mother had to stop working for three months to support Yami and her dad worked night shifts to ensure her younger sisters, aged five and nine, were looked after.
Talking about the impact Yami’s diagnosis had on her sisters, she said: “My five-year-old sister – she’s still quite little so doesn’t really know what’s going on but, for my nine-year-old sister, it was horrible for her because it was like, ‘when are you coming home’ and she was so upset when I lost my hair. That was really tough for them as well.”
On December 30, Yami was rushed back into hospital as she was struggling to breathe. A subsequent scan showed that her cancer had doubled in size.
The original plan was to have her latest round of chemotherapy after her nineteenth birthday on January 13 but this latest revelation meant that she had to be bed bound on her special day. A close friend did, however, make sure to throw her a surprise party to make up for it.
Yami, on her rounds of chemotherapy, said: “You don’t realise how it has an impact on every day life – like, my mum being able to wake up and go to work but she has to check up on me.
“The first three weeks when I have chemo are the worst. I am in bed and mum is bringing me food then you have a week off and that’s great and you get your energy back but then, the week after, it is three days of chemo again.”
Yami’s best friend, Amelia Skippen, launched a fundraiser to help raise much needed money to cover the costs of Yami’s trips to Oxford, childcare for her younger sisters so that her parents can be with her whenever possible and donations to the cancer charities who have helped Yami and her family throughout her treatment.
Amelia said: “This has been such a horrible time for the whole family, especially with Covid, meaning we have rarely been able to see Yami and, when we have seen her, it’s been from a distance.
“Nobody should have to face cancer alone, particularly at such a young age. So please, if you can reach in to your pockets to help these guys have a better year, it would be massively appreciated.
“Yami should have also been at university this year but has had to have a year out to try and fix her health. Please help us help her achieve her dream and get her to university.”
Amelia set up the fundraiser as a surprise for her best friend, Yami, who expressed delight and gratitude when she found out that the GoFundMe page has already accumulated £130 in donations as of January 18, 2022.
In a message to those who have kindly donated to the fundraiser so far, Yami said: “I can’t even say thank you enough because these people don’t even know me and, out of everyone they could help, they chose to help me – it’s such a humbling experience. I am so grateful to everyone.
“It is one of the most common cancers for people of my age and I didn’t even know that. I want to raise awareness for it as well.”
Hodgkin lymphoma can develop at any age but it mostly affects people aged between 20 and 40 years and those over 75. Slightly more men than women are affected, according to the NHS.Around 2,100 people are diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma in the UK each year.
To find out more about Yami’s fundraiser or make a donation, visit the GoFundMe page.

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