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“How To Make Money” TikTok Videos Teach You About Side Hustles – Bustle

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Thanks to a new trend, you don’t have to be a creator or an influencer to make money on TikTok — well, kind of. Millennial financial experts are posting videos on TikTok featuring tips and tricks to make big bucks from home, with minimal work. Videos with hashtags like #financialfreedom and #onlinebusiness, #makemoney and #passiveincome have hundreds of millions of views. In these quick-take videos, entrepreneurs describe how they’re making money online, how you can make money online, and how well their business is doing — and yeah, they’re showing receipts.
If you naturally cringe at claims that remote gigs can provide you the opportunity to make thousands of dollars without lifting a finger, the financial entrepreneurs of TikTok don’t blame you — and they’re also not trying to change your mind. "Never trust ‘get rich quick schemes’ you hear about," Sharon Tseung, 29, a passive income and online business entrepreneur with 140,000 followers on TikTok, tells Bustle. "Passive income does take hard work, which may sound ironic," she says.
This TikTok trend might be particularly appealing in a pandemic where job rates are only just starting to come back from a steep decline. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, in July, 31.3 million workers reported being unable to work at some point in the last month due to the pandemic’s effect on their workplace or trade. And as of August, there were 13.55 million people unemployed in the U.S., down from a high of 23 million in April, but still way more than 5.79 million in February, pre-pandemic.
"Due to the effects of the pandemic, my platforms have dramatically increased in traffic and following, because people are becoming curious about expanding the amount of income streams they have," Tseung says.

TikTok entrepreneurs share the various ways they make money online in a combination of story-time videos and quick-cut slides, adding screenshots of dated revenue reports as proof. They share these videos both to share their experience, but also expertise. Many finance Tok-ers also offer educational and consulting services as another hustle — meaning, they’re making money by telling their followers how to make money.
But a lot of these income streams are passive income, or money that makes itself. "It can require a decent amount of work to get started, but not much to maintain," Tseung tells Bustle. For example, becoming a landlord takes a lot of preparation to get your property rented, but once a lease is underway, you make money without much added effort. But you don’t have to be homeowner to access passive income streams.
"I started making passive income as a freelance writer on Fiverr. It has now grown into a freelancing empire, with a few online courses and ebooks as well," Alexandra Fasulo, 27, an online gig worker with 132,000 followers on TikTok, tells Bustle. On Fiverr, you can earn money for different editing, illustration, and content multi-media creation-related tasks. "I started to sell my editing for only $5 and thought to myself, if I can earn $40 per month, I bet I can earn $100, $200, $1,000 — and I did," Fasulo tells Bustle.
The value in passive income, according these entrepreneurs, is that you can diversify your income, work for yourself, and adjust your output to fit your lifestyle. "I realized that if I could make money work for me and not the other way around, it would free up my life to spend more time with my loved ones, create the passion projects I’ve always been interested in, and travel when I wanted to," Tseung says. She offers creative services like logos for apparel via Merch by Amazon. She also sells digital downloads on Etsy (like Photoshop or Microsoft Word templates that she makes herself), and collects Google AdSense revenue on YouTube video views and blogpost clicks.
"I always advise gauging your time, capital, strengths, and passions before you choose any side hustle," Tseung says. If you have a block of time to create some products, like designs or digital downloads, you can put that into motion with little maintenance required. But if you have extra time on a more consistent basis, you might want to experiment with blogging, making YouTube videos or creating content that you can collect regular ad revenue on. (Unlike multi-level marketing schemes, which are often touted as quick ways to make passive income, these types of revenue streams don’t hinge on your ability to sign people up to sell products under you. )
While Tseung has graphic design skills that she’s honed in Photoshop, she says you don’t need to pay for software or have design skills to create sellable work. "You can create these products through free software like Google Docs, Google Sheets, and Canva." If you’re not an artist, you can create budgeting templates, meal plans, recipe books, e-books, courses, and worksheets, and so on. "If you have knowledge in a specific niche, think about what types of digital files could provide value in your area of expertise," Tseung says.
"I would suggest freelancing while working your other job. I did this for one year," Fasulo says. After that first year, she saw enough growth from her online gig work that she was able to transition fully. "The first year I made about $36,000. The next year it was $67,000, and then $90,000, and then six figures," she says.
"If you’re dependent on only one income source, you’re putting all your eggs into one basket which can be extremely risky. I prefer diversification," Tseung says, adding that the more you branch out, the bigger your safety net gets.
The vast majority of TikTok’s finance personalities — jazzed-up entrepreneurs giving tips on how to make money online and retire young — are male, as a quick scroll through any of the hashtags will tell you. There’s only a handful of women who are breaking through the algorithm, and even so, they have significantly fewer followers than their male counterparts. The women who are a part of this trend say that representation, even on TikTok, is key to help other women achieve financial security and confidence in their ability to make money.
"I have received comments that made me feel undermined as a female entrepreneur and investor. It’s not always the case, but there are times I feel I have to work harder to be respected as an equal," Tseung tells Bustle.
"I think it’s important we normalize that women can make just as much money as men today," Fasulo tells Bustle. She explains that she often receives negative or discouraging comments from men on TikTok, especially when she shares her income stats. They express disbelief and blame her success on her looks, she says. "They leave comments saying I make the money using OnlyFans or say I must have a rich man behind the scenes," she adds. "I think if more women supported other women and their financial expertise on TikTok, it would create a culture in which women and men were comfortable seeing a woman earn six figures."
"When there’s less support and less people like you doing something, there’s more fear in trying," Tseung says.
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Do you know how to earn money on YouTube? Make online videos pay – HT Tech

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Being a content creator on YouTube is no easy task, as many have discovered over the years. In fact, to earn money online, the going can be tough. money Merely owning a camera and a high-speed internet connection is not enough to earn money on YouTube and there is no way to know if your content will perform well on YouTube. However, for those with perseverance and enough patience, having a channel with regular content can help you earn money on YouTube. Here is how to earn money on YouTube.
YouTube Partner Program
If you want your YouTube videos to make money on the platform, you must apply to the YouTube Partner Program. However, not all users who apply are accepted –  they must fulfil certain requirements before they are accepted. For example, you must live in a valid region where the program is available, have a linked AdSense account, and no active Community Guidelines strikes against your channel. You must also have over 1,000 subscribers and over 4,000 valid public watch hours over the last 12 months at the time of applying to be in the YouTube Partner Program.
Also read: Looking for a smartphone? Check Mobile Finder here.
YouTube Premium revenue
While the YouTube Partner Program can net you a decent amount of revenue assuming you have enough views on your videos, content creators can also make their videos available on YouTube Premium. This will allow users who have subscribed to the Premium version of YouTube to access your content without ads and you can earn a small portion of the membership fees depending on how many views you get.
Channel memberships
Thanks to the Merch shelf feature, content creators can lock some content behind a paywall of sorts that allows for members-only access to badges, emoji and other goods on the platform. These memberships can only be enabled if you have a Community tab, you have more than 1,000 subscribers, you’re part of the YouTube Partner Program, and your channel is not marked as Made for Kids or has similar ineligible videos.
Merch shelf
Eligible creators on YouTube can showcase their own branded merchandise that can be sold by a retailer. According to Google, the shelf shows up on the main videos tab, and shows up to 12 products to viewers. You will need to have over 10,000 subscribers to set up a merch self on the platform, which is not something every YouTube creator will find easy to reach.
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How to share a Google Doc privately – The Verge

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Make sure you know whom you’re sharing it with
Recently, I got Slacked by a colleague who was really annoyed and had to let off a bit of steam. It seems that a writer had shared a new Google Docs article with them (a usual way of submitting a freelance piece), and when my colleague opened the article, they found another, unknown person was already reading it — somebody who was definitely not on our staff.
What had happened? The writer, probably in too much of a hurry to share the document with specific people, had simply made it public so that anybody could have access to it. This not only made the article available to anyone before it had been properly edited and published — something no publication wants — but opened it up to all sorts of mischief.
Mischief like what happened in June 2021, when another editor accidentally tweeted the link to an editable document to their followers. (The Verge’s site was temporarily down, and it seemed like a good idea to publish news to Google Docs in the meantime.) Merriment ensued.
So obviously, allowing anyone to view, comment on, or edit a Google Doc can lead to problems, especially if the link to that document is passed around. Interestingly, when you first create a Google Doc, the software’s default is that this is a private document, only to be shared if you explicitly request it. (There can be exceptions; if this is a business account, the administrator may have changed the default so that it is automatically shared by others in your company.) So usually, you have to consciously make the document completely public.
So here’s how you can share your Google Docs document — carefully.
First, go into the document you want to share and click on the large Share button in the upper right corner.
You’ll get a pop-up window headed “Share with people and groups.”
Begin typing the person or groups’ name into the field just below that. If that person is in your contact list, their name will appear; if not, you can type in their full email address. You can type in more than one name; however, this means that all those you’ve added will be given the same type of access to the document. (We’ll talk about access in a sec.)
When you’ve added at least one name, you’ll see a box to the right that says “Editor.” Click on that for a drop-down menu that lets you select the type of access that the people / group can have to your document. These include:
It’s usually a good idea to select the most restrictive type that’s practical enough for your use case. For example, if you’re writing a document together with several others, you’ll want to give them editor status; but if you don’t want them to make any changes without your approval, then commenter status is better.
(Expert tip: if the people you’ve shared with have changed the document but didn’t tell you what they changed, go to “File” > “Version history” > “See version history.” You’ll see a color-coded rundown on the right showing when the document was edited and by whom; click on the date, and the changes will be visible in the document, together with the color associated with the different users.)
You can also tweak the amount of access that editors, commenters, and viewers have to your document by selecting the settings icon (a cog wheel) in the upper right corner of that pop-up box. By unchecking the boxes in the settings pop-up, you can prevent editors from being able to change your permissions or share the document, and you can prevent editors and commenters from being able to download, print, and copy the document.
Once you’ve finished adding the people you want to share with, make sure the “Notify people” box is checked if you want to send them an email letting them know about the document; a field below that lets you type in a personal message that will be added to Google’s canned email.
But wait, there’s more.
There is a “Get Link” section below the “Share with People and Groups” section that lets you copy the link to your document (for example, if you’d rather text the link to one of your permitted sharers). The default is called “Restricted,” which means the only people who can see the document are those you’ve shared it with. But you can also use the “Get Link” section to make the link more accessible to more people.
To do that, click on “Restricted” and change it to “Anyone with the link.” That means anyone who has the link — whether you’ve sent it, or a friend has sent it, or it’s been posted to Twitter — can access the document. (Even here, however, you can adjust access so that people have either Viewer, Commenter, or Editor rights.)
Sharing a document is also possible — if slightly more awkward — on a mobile device.

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Stripe Helps Creators Boost 'Internet GDP' With Help of Platforms, Payments and Subscriptions – pymnts.com

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The platform economy, combined with the creator economy, is primed to help artists, musicians and podcasters, among others, turn their talents into money.
As Lily Q. Jolly, product lead for Stripe Express, told PYMNTS in an interview, making it easy to pay creators — in the way they want to be paid, and through subscriptions — will add significantly to the “GDP of the Internet.”
To that end, Spotify said this week that it is broadening its podcast subscription offerings, underpinned by Stripe’s payment infrastructure, to include paid monthly content. Podcast Subscriptions, now tied to Stripe Connect, supports currencies and payments across 34 countries, from Austria to the U.S.
Read Also: Stripe Teams With Spotify to Drive Subscription Monetization for Creators
Jolly stated that the creator economy, though relatively nascent, has seen creators across dozens of platforms (in partnership with Stripe) earn about $10 billion in revenue, and enabling more individuals to earn “livable wages” (in the U.S., that’s at least $69,000 annually).
As Jolly noted, the creator space is a slice of the economy that barely existed a few years ago. Until recently, the creators themselves spread their offerings across a slew of platforms, navigating different payment systems and currencies.
“They are trying every which way to make a living out of this,” she said.
The pact with Spotify follows linkups where Stripe has powered tipping on TikTok and Twitter on its Super Follows paid subscriptions.
Read Also: TikTok to Allow Users to Tip Favorite Creators
In terms of the mechanics, cross-border payments can be sent and received in different currencies, while other Stripe offerings such as invoicing and Stripe Billing help bill for the subscriptions.
Monetizing the Content 
With the pact, she said, “Spotify has leaned in really hard when it comes to enabling their creators to monetize what they do.”
Streamlining payments and pivoting toward subscriptions can make it easier for creators to experiment while making money online. Recurring revenues from subscriptions can be a lifeline. The Subscription Podcast with Spotify enables creators to make money in a predictable way. As she noted, “we all enjoy being able to have a sense of how much money we are going to make.”
“The goal is to be as broad as we can,” she said, with presence in countries with less-developed banking and payments infrastructure.
With the subscription model, she said, creators can offer and monetize content that their followers love, routinely, versus having to nudge their audience every single time a new podcast comes out.
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