Connect with us

How To?

In the Klang Valley, food vendors say delivery platforms a boon not everyone can afford – Malay Mail

Published

on

Loading…
Tuesday, 03 Aug 2021 04:59 AM MYT
BY JERRY CHOONG

A food delivery rider picks up his order at Hakim Nasi Kandar, Shah Alam January 13, 2021. — Picture by Miera Zulyana
A food delivery rider picks up his order at Hakim Nasi Kandar, Shah Alam January 13, 2021. — Picture by Miera Zulyana

Follow us on Instagram and subscribe to our Telegram channel for the latest updates.


Follow us on Instagram and subscribe to our Telegram channel for the latest updates.
KUALA LUMPUR, Aug 3 ― Although food delivery platforms were initially hailed as lifesavers by food vendors and restaurants during the Covid-19 pandemic, the reality for some is that the effort is costing them too much money.
Some vendors have been complaining of fees and charges they allege were not clearly explained.
And some have taken to social media to vent their frustrations, with a vendor sharing a screenshot of her invoice on social media some weeks back which showed she had made just 24 sen from RM1,400 in sales.
The majority of her earnings had been taken up by the commission percentage as well as “fees and adjustments.”
Then there are updated policies which some vendors allege to be unfair and open to abuse.
One such vendor is Faizal Abdullah, 40, who resides in Damansara and sells nasi campur on a delivery platform.
“Four times a month they will make payment to vendors, based on their sales. Usually vendors also have the option to take on any of the offers to promote their shops, so that it can be included in the top listings.
“I personally feel the pricing for the offers is prohibitive, as it can cost a vendor at least RM400 in my experience. But for those vendors who are making a tidy profit that pushes or surpasses five figures a month, it can be worth it,” he told Malay Mail.
Delivery platforms would charge vendors for marketing costs, which Faisal said some vendors might not be fully aware of when they sign up for the promotions. 
“I think it is more of an issue where vendors do not realise how much exactly it will cost them, or have been persuaded by the promos claiming it will boost their customer numbers.
“Marketing is a necessity for vendors using the platform, but it would be better if the company takes the time to clearly explain to us what the entailed costs are when signing up for their promo offers, so that we will not be taken by surprise when the invoices come in,” he said. 
Burger seller Trish D’Cruz, 36, said her main concern is the change to the refund policy for vendors, in the event a customer cancels an order.
“Prior to the start of the month, any cancellations of orders would result in the entire amount being refunded to the vendor. However this has changed to 40 per cent, which, to me, highlights the flaws in the system.
“While we get back 40 per cent of the money spent on making the order, the customer who cancelled the order still gets the food along with a voucher.”
D’Cruz shared suspicions that some customers could be intentionally abusing cancellations as a result, noting that the refund vouchers appeared to be available for sale online, but conceded that there was no proof of such abuse.
“Additionally in my invoices I get charged every week for things like SIM card and Internet usage. I did not even get the SIM card from the platform, and I use my own WiFi only,” she said.
The Puchong resident uses two food delivery platforms, and said one is less problematic than the other.
“It is very transparent, which I am happy with. I am aware that big corporate companies will always have hidden charges and fine print.
“Look, to be frank I think all of this is very unnecessary, but we live in a capitalist world, so what to do? We kind of need them and they take advantage of that, so we just get stuck in the system,” she said.
D’Cruz added that she is in a difficult position as she did not have much choice but to keep using the two most popular food delivery platforms in the country.
“I have had no job for almost two years now, so I had to do something to make ends’ meet. I cannot make my own deliveries because of so many restrictions.
“To even get a letter from the authorities and permission from the relevant bodies is a futile process, with dead ends everywhere. So these platforms help in a way, and I can only hope they improve the situation so that we can all continue to make a living,” she said.
Malay food seller Alia Haryana Bahar, 40, who lives in KL, said the refund policy for vendors from the platform she signed up with has had the biggest effect on her earnings.
“It is already bad that they only refund 40 per cent of the order’s value when it’s cancelled. But when a patron complains to customer service, it is taken at face value without any investigation. We are given no opportunity to explain our side of the story.
“I will not deny the platform has been a great help to my sales in the three years that I have been using the platform, but things are becoming unbearable as it is. And there is also the issue of performance fees,” she said.
According to Alia, performance fees are when the platform makes a fixed deduction from a vendor’s revenue once they have made or surpassed a certain level of profit when using the platform. If a vendor makes RM1,000 in sales, then RM25 will be taken, and if they make RM5,000 in sales, RM75 is deducted as a result.
“It seems to me that the more we make, the more in performance fees they will charge us. I do not understand the need for there to be such fees to begin with.
“I use five different platforms to take orders from customers, of which two are the most efficient. One of them is relatively faster with payments daily instead of several times a month, making it easier for me to get my ingredients and supplies,” Alia said.
“Those who are just starting out really need to have petty cash on hand. I can only imagine the difficulties they must be facing.”
Loading…
© 2021, Malay Mail, All Rights Reserved.

source

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

How To?

The average cost of a vacation: Transportation, food, entertainment and more – Bankrate.com

Published

on

Elevate your Bankrate experience
Get insider access to our best financial tools and content
Elevate your Bankrate experience
Get insider access to our best financial tools and content
Looking for the perfect credit card?
Narrow your search with CardMatch™
Elevate your Bankrate experience
Get insider access to our best financial tools and content
Elevate your Bankrate experience
Get insider access to our best financial tools and content
Elevate your Bankrate experience
Get insider access to our best financial tools and content
Elevate your Bankrate experience
Get insider access to our best financial tools and content
Elevate your Bankrate experience
Get insider access to our best financial tools and content
We are an independent, advertising-supported comparison service. Our goal is to help you make smarter financial decisions by providing you with interactive tools and financial calculators, publishing original and objective content, by enabling you to conduct research and compare information for free – so that you can make financial decisions with confidence.
Bankrate has partnerships with issuers including, but not limited to, American Express, Bank of America, Capital One, Chase, Citi and Discover.
The offers that appear on this site are from companies that compensate us. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site, including, for example, the order in which they may appear within the listing categories. But this compensation does not influence the information we publish, or the reviews that you see on this site. We do not include the universe of companies or financial offers that may be available to you.
While we adhere to strict , this post may contain references to products from our partners. Here’s an explanation for .
Founded in 1976, Bankrate has a long track record of helping people make smart financial choices. We’ve maintained this reputation for over four decades by demystifying the financial decision-making process and giving people confidence in which actions to take next.
Bankrate follows a strict editorial policy, so you can trust that we’re putting your interests first. All of our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts, who ensure everything we publish is objective, accurate and trustworthy.
Our banking reporters and editors focus on the points consumers care about most — the best banks, latest rates, different types of accounts, money-saving tips and more — so you can feel confident as you’re managing your money.
Bankrate follows a strict editorial policy, so you can trust that we’re putting your interests first. Our award-winning editors and reporters create honest and accurate content to help you make the right financial decisions.
We value your trust. Our mission is to provide readers with accurate and unbiased information, and we have editorial standards in place to ensure that happens. Our editors and reporters thoroughly fact-check editorial content to ensure the information you’re reading is accurate. We maintain a firewall between our advertisers and our editorial team. Our editorial team does not receive direct compensation from our advertisers.
Bankrate’s editorial team writes on behalf of YOU – the reader. Our goal is to give you the best advice to help you make smart personal finance decisions. We follow strict guidelines to ensure that our editorial content is not influenced by advertisers. Our editorial team receives no direct compensation from advertisers, and our content is thoroughly fact-checked to ensure accuracy. So, whether you’re reading an article or a review, you can trust that you’re getting credible and dependable information.
You have money questions. Bankrate has answers. Our experts have been helping you master your money for over four decades. We continually strive to provide consumers with the expert advice and tools needed to succeed throughout life’s financial journey.
Bankrate follows a strict editorial policy, so you can trust that our content is honest and accurate. Our award-winning editors and reporters create honest and accurate content to help you make the right financial decisions. The content created by our editorial staff is objective, factual, and not influenced by our advertisers.
We’re transparent about how we are able to bring quality content, competitive rates, and useful tools to you by explaining how we make money.
Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. We are compensated in exchange for placement of sponsored products and, services, or by you clicking on certain links posted on our site. Therefore, this compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear within listing categories. Other factors, such as our own proprietary website rules and whether a product is offered in your area or at your self-selected credit score range can also impact how and where products appear on this site. While we strive to provide a wide range offers, Bankrate does not include information about every financial or credit product or service.
This content is powered by HomeInsurance.com, a licensed insurance producer (NPN: 8781838) and a corporate affiliate of Bankrate.com. HomeInsurance.com LLC services are only available in states were it is licensed and insurance coverage through HomeInsurance.com may not be available in all states. All insurance products are governed by the terms in the applicable insurance policy, and all related decisions (such as approval for coverage, premiums, commissions and fees) and policy obligations are the sole responsibility of the underwriting insurer. The information on this site does not modify any insurance policy terms in any way.
Americans are ready for a vacation. According to a survey from AAA Travel, 55 percent of adults in the U.S. are planning a getaway of at least one night before the end of 2022.
It’s smart to plan, save money and budget for a vacation, especially since some places still have COVID-19 restrictions and the cost of fuel, food and most everything else is on the rise.
Vacation costs vary tremendously depending on the destination, accommodations, activities and other factors. The average cost of a one-week vacation in the U.S. for one person is $1,558. Here are some average costs to help you budget for your vacation.
Transportation, accommodations and food and entertainment are the main expenses of a vacation budget. Let’s look at each of these categories more closely.
Getting to and from your vacation destination can account for the single largest chunk of your vacation budget, so start with transportation costs when planning your trip. Besides airfare, if you’re flying, consider other transportation costs. Do you plan to rent a car? If so, you have to figure how much you expect to spend on gas, tolls and parking fees.
If you plan to take public trains and buses or use rideshare services such as Uber and Lyft, tally those costs into your total transportation budget. If you’re leaving a car at the airport, don’t forget to add that in, too.
Airline ticket prices plummeted 19 percent in 2020 due to COVID-19, but prices are rising due to increased demand and higher fuel prices. The majority of Americans plan to take their first post-pandemic trip to visit family and friends.
Hotel prices vary dramatically depending on the location and demand. An oceanfront hotel room in South Florida, for example, will cost more in the winter months than in summer, when deals can be found. If your budget isn’t generous and you’re OK with fewer comforts, hostels or a recreational vehicle park can save you money.
Food and entertainment expenses can lighten your wallet if you don’t draft a thorough vacation budget. They tend to be among the last costs travelers consider when planning a trip.
Budgeting for a family vacation can be trickier than budgeting for a solo trip, especially if young children are coming along. You probably won’t be eating at posh restaurants and strolling museums with kids in tow, but you likely will have to budget for a bigger hotel room and reservations for activities they’ll enjoy. Don’t forget to look for group rates and discounts, if eligible.
AAA’s latest Travel Trends report shows that baby boomers spend the most on vacations, probably because 53 percent of them are retired. Millennials spend the least, but are more likely than other generations to use technology to book plans ahead of time.
In addition, millennials are most likely to go in debt for travel, according to a VRBO survey, with baby boomers least likely to go in debt for vacations.
A “staycation” is a vacation without travel. You stay home, but take day trips. No packing, no checking in and out of hotels, no renting cars, no air travel. A staycation can be less stressful, and certainly less expensive, than a traveling vacation. Aside from the money you save, a staycation has other advantages. Here are some of the pluses of taking a staycation versus a vacation:
Planning a vacation on a budget requires forethought and creativity, but the time and effort invested could not only save you money but also make your vacation go smoother.
Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.
Bankrate, LLC NMLS ID# 1427381 | NMLS Consumer Access
BR Tech Services, Inc. NMLS ID #1743443 | NMLS Consumer Access
© 2021 Bankrate, LLC. A Red Ventures company. All Rights Reserved.

source

Continue Reading

How To?

How to Follow – Duke vs. Miami – Duke University – GoDuke.com

Published

on

source

Continue Reading

How To?

REITs Are Recurring Revenue Models By Default – Seeking Alpha

Published

on

source

Continue Reading

Trending