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Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Yoga Gen 6: High-end laptop receives a 'doorbuster' discount of 54% with nearly US$1950 in savings – Notebookcheck.net

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Earlier this year, Lenovo released the sixth generation of the ThinkPad X1 Yoga, which arrived with a new chassis, a faster processor and a 16:10 display. The ThinkPad X1 Yoga Gen 6 is not without shortcomings, but we still awarded it a 91% overall rating.
While the laptop is only a few months old, Lenovo is offering one configuration for less than half its list price. As the screenshot below shows, Lenovo has reduced a high-end model by 54%, a saving of US$1,948.46 on its US$3,609 MSRP.
For reference, this configuration comes with an Intel Core i7-1165G7 processor, along with 16 GB of LPDDR4X RAM running at 4,266 MHz. Lenovo complements the soldered RAM with a 1 TB PCIe SSD, which both rely on a 57 Wh battery. The configuration also has a 14-inch touchscreen display with an anti-glare coating. Additionally, the display operates natively at 1,920 x 1,200 pixels and 400 nits.
Lenovo stresses that it has limited stock of the configuration. The company also offers a financing program, should you prefer to pay US$1,660.14 in 12 monthly instalments. Lenovo states that the ThinkPad X1 Yoga Gen 6 will ship within a few days of being ordered.
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One-Third of People Have $100 or Less in Their Checking Accounts, Survey Shows — Here's How Much Experts Say You Should Actually Have – GOBankingRates

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Checking accounts are the bedrock of personal finance in the United States. According to a recent GOBankingRates survey of more than 1,300 adults from all over the country, more than 95% of America has a checking account, the highest percentage among all account types. However, more than one-third of those surveyed say they barely keep any money in checking at all. 
Read More: Gen Z and Millennials Favor National and Online Banks, Survey Shows — What Does That Mean for the Future of Credit Unions?
See: GOBankingRates’ Best Online Banks of 2022
GOBankingRates talked to experts who were stunned by the study’s findings, as well as some who thought it sounded just about right. Here’s what money professionals think is the appropriate amount of cash to keep liquid and at the ready in a checking account.  
GOBankingRates’ Top Picks: Best Savings Account of 2022

The study found that 35% of the country — more than 1 in 3 Americans — keep less than $100 in their checking accounts at any given time. For context, consider that the next-biggest groups — the 18% who have balances of either $101-$500 or $501-$1,000 — were only about half as big. 
For about 11% of the country, the magic number falls between $1,001 and $1,500. A little less than 6% have up to $2,000 in checking and about 13% keep more than $2,000. 
If you think that a double-digit account balance for one-third of the country sounds insufficient, you’re in good company. 
“It honestly surprises me that the number is so low,” said Julie Ramhold, consumer analyst with DealNews.com. “I would expect many to be putting the bulk of their income into a checking account still.” 
So, if $99 or less is low, where is the sweet spot? 
“The short answer is that most experts advise keeping one to two months worth of living expenses in your checking account,” Ramhold said. “It’s also good to pad out that number with an extra 25% to 30% of your monthly living expenses as an extra cushion.” 
Boost Your Finances: 7 Simple Habits That Will Make You Richer in 2022
Not all experts were shocked by the study’s findings — in fact, at least one thinks the results are right on the money. 
“I keep less than $100 in my checking account for several reasons,” said Wendy Barlin, CPA. 
The first argument in favor of an ultra-low balance is that checking accounts earn zero interest or, in the best of cases, close to it — but Barlin cited another point that’s equally convincing. 
“Checking accounts are linked to debit cards, which are the biggest fraud problem,” Barlin said. “I don’t want someone taking money out of my checking account. I keep all my money in a savings or money market account.”
It is, after all, much easier to get credit card companies to reverse fraudulent charges than it is to get banks to return cash. 
Find Out: How To Compound Your Income in 2022
As you can see, the spectrum is so broad that it ranges from $99 to two months worth of living expenses plus 30% — and that’s after speaking to only two experts. Some said you should have up to six months on hand. 
A consensus is elusive, of course, because everyone’s life and financial footprint are unique.  
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“How much you should keep in your checking account depends on various factors, such as your income and expected expenses, recurring bill payments and cash withdrawals,” said Laura Adams, MBA, a personal finance expert with Finder.com
Another reason that the “right amount” is so hard to nail down has to do with the transitory nature of money held in checking accounts. Checking accounts are a temporary way station for money that will be redirected to pay credit card bills, fund investment accounts and IRAs, and settle up for the month with the mortgage lender.
“Most people deposit income into their checking and make disbursements from that central account for everyday expenses and savings,” Adams said.
One school of thought says that the right amount is whatever you need to cover your expenses — and not much else. Whatever’s left over, after all, could be put to better use elsewhere.
“Since interest earnings on bank accounts are typically a fraction of 1%, keeping large sums in a checking account isn’t a wise option,” Adams said. “Moving excess money into higher-yield savings allows you to earn more interest and maintain a separate fund for emergencies.”
There’s even an argument to be made for putting that money in an index fund since savings yields aren’t much better than checking yields, but if you are a checking account minimalist, remember that it’s better to have a little too much money than not enough. 
Keep Reading: Here’s How Much You Need To Earn To Be ‘Rich’ in Every State
While you don’t want too much money idling in checking when it could be earning you money somewhere else, a healthy cushion of cash is an absolute must if you want to avoid the significant penalties that come with maintaining an underfunded checking account. 
“As a general rule of thumb, your goal should be to maintain a balance that helps you to avoid the risk of becoming overdrawn or incurring bank fees,” said Maxim Manturov, head of investment research at Freedom Finance Europe, a subdivision of Nasdaq-traded Freedom Holding Corp. “With this in mind, your account should never drop below your minimum required balance, so it’s important to consider your expenses accordingly, as well as your general monthly outflow.” 
It’s likely that part of the reason people keep so little money in their checking accounts today is that low balances aren’t as dangerous as they once were. Most banks let you transfer money instantly from savings to checking if things get tight — even after hours — or you can set up overdraft protection that moves money automatically from savings to checking to cover a debit in progress. Those are all incredibly helpful tools that would have seemed like magic a generation ago to anyone who ever wrote a check that they didn’t realize they couldn’t cover. 
But unlike checking accounts, the money you put in savings was not designed to be transitory. That money is supposed to stay put, and if you overuse your savings account as a backstop to your checking account, you’ll start incurring penalties. That’s because Federal Reserve Board Regulation D forbids you from making more than six withdrawals from a savings account per month.
For Your Financial Future: $1M Is No Longer the Standard Nest Egg – Here’s How Much Most Americans Think You Actually Need To Retire
In the GOBankingRates survey, the oldest Americans — those ages 65 and up — were far more likely to have larger balances in their checking accounts and far less likely to have low balances than all other age groups, with younger sets trending farthest in the other direction. 
It’s not only because 20-somethings tend to have less money than their elders — technology has forced a generational divide in banking habits and attitudes. 
In a world of crypto wallets and Venmo, paper checks — and the accounts they’re linked to — have taken on a very 20th-century feel. Many young people have never written a check and have certainly never used longhand arithmetic to balance a checkbook, which is by now the financial equivalent of cursive. 
Older people tend to favor the security of having plenty of cash “on hand” in their checking accounts, while younger generations tend to view all their money as being on hand all the time. With 24/7 access to PayPal, p2p payments, buy now, pay later purchasing options, and nearly instant transfers from brokerages to banks, why should they fret about the balance in their checking accounts?
“In the height of the information age, people are getting smarter about personal financial wellness,” said James Dunavant, CEO of the personal finance platform Tend. “Naturally, their preferences are also shifting toward more transparent platforms that offer faster, simpler and more personalized services. Rather than keeping their money in a checking account, consumers are exploring other options that provide greater benefits, whether it’s increased convenience, speedier processing, more rewards or fewer hidden fees. The next generation, in particular, has a deeper understanding of the wide breadth of financial tools that are available to them, and they’re willing to do the extra research to move their money into the best money management services, platforms and apps that make sense for their individual needs and goals.”
More From GOBankingRates
Methodology: GOBankingRates surveyed 1,335 Americans aged 18 and older from across the country on between December 1 and 3, 2021, asking twelve different questions: (1) What category does your current financial institution fall under?; (2) Have you considered changing Banks within the past year?; (3) If you have considered changing banks in the past year, were any of the following factors? (select all that apply):; (4) Which feature, perk, or other offering is most important to you when opening an account with a new institution?; (5) Are you currently satisfied with all your banking products and services offered by your Bank/Credit Union?; (6) Would you ever have different types of accounts across multiple banks? (i.e. Checking at Chase, but Savings at TD Bank); (7) What is your most preferred method of banking?; (8) Which of the following is the biggest factor of you staying with your current bank?; (9) Which of the following bank accounts do you currently use/have open? (Select all that apply); (10) How much is the minimum balance you keep in your Checking Account?; (11) How much do you currently have in your Savings Account?; and (12) If you are in a relationship or married do you share bank account(s) with your partner? All respondents had to pass a screener question of: Are you currently a member of a Bank (online included) or Credit Union?, with an answer of “Yes”. GOBankingRates used PureSpectrum’s survey platform to conduct the poll.

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How To Make Money Online: 11 Proven Ways for 2021 – GOBankingRates

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Many of the offers appearing on this site are from advertisers from which this website receives compensation for being listed here. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). These offers do not represent all available deposit, investment, loan or credit products.
Remote work isn’t new. As many as one-fourth of Americans worked a few hours from home even before the shutdowns that occurred due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, in the digital era, more money-making opportunities are available than ever before. You can earn money online without working around the clock — or leaving the house at all.
Plus, working online can have benefits that a traditional 9-to-5 job doesn’t have, such as extreme flexibility, passive income and even total financial freedom.
Are you feeling motivated yet? If so, check out these great ideas for how to make money online from home.
If you’re going to take the leap into the digital workspace, choose work that aligns with your goals. Fortunately, you have plenty of options — from selling your photos to teaching peers — to earn money online and boost your savings.
A growing number of companies are hiring remote workers. It’s also possible to be your own boss and work as a consultant or freelancer. Here are a few examples of full- and part-time jobs that let you earn money from home.
If you have a passion for writing, you might be able to make money online in 2021 by writing content for blogs or websites. Many companies offer assignments to aspiring and experienced writers alike.
Freelance sites, such as the popular Upwork, often have jobs available for virtual assistants, bookkeepers, web designers and more. Demand for freelancers increased dramatically during the COVID-19 lockdowns. According to Freelancer’s “Fast 50” report, job postings on its site increased by 41% in the second quarter of 2020 — compared to the same quarter in 2019.
If you design a wildly popular app, you might be able to generate significant income. You can earn money by charging for the app, displaying in-app ads or charging for in-app features and upgrades.
Americans own more smartphones than computers. Moreover, the number of Americans who rely on their smartphones is expected to increase. This also increases the demand for new apps, so you can make money online with a smartphone while using your smartphone.
If you have an interest in web development, take advantage of the demand for designers to build sites for businesses or organizations. Most graphic designers have a bachelor’s degree. Knowledge of design, computer graphics and design software are necessary.
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Sites such as Upwork are a good place to start for finding clients and building your portfolio.
If you have in-depth expertise about a specific subject, you could create digital media products to sell your knowledge and skills to others. Choose the format that best suits your audience and skill set, and then start producing.
If you have a story to tell or special knowledge to share, record it in a podcast. Podcasts are surprisingly simple to create and cost significantly less to produce than other digital media. The one drawback, however, is the ease of entry, which can lead to overcrowding in the marketplace.
Sites such as Adobe Stock and Shutterstock allow you to contribute your prized photography in addition to other media, which can generate royalties from each sale. Best of all, you retain all of the rights to your photos. You can use them in your own work or promote them on other sites.
The trends for photography in 2021 call for pictures that tell an emotional story, return to nature or exhibit “realness,” Shutterstock reported.
Every day, get fresh ideas on how to save and make money and achieve your financial goals.

The internet makes it easier to match people in need with those who offer in-demand services. Platforms such as Fiverr and Care.com — and even online classifieds listings like Craigslist — give you a place to advertise.
Some services, like tutoring, can be done over the internet. Others, like food delivery, take place in the real world. Here are a few examples of each.
Medical transcriptions provide a valuable service to healthcare providers. They listen to recorded notes from doctors and other practitioners and type them into reports. It’s a great option for working at home on your own time.
Pizza delivery has been a staple part-time job for years. Now food delivery apps like DoorDash and Grubhub have expanded the concept to restaurants of all types. All you need is a reliable vehicle and working GPS to find your way around town.
You’ll work when restaurants are busy, mostly during lunch and dinner times.
If you have a smartphone, there are options to earn money from an app in 2021. Some of the top apps include cash-back services and mobile listing sites. Best of all, you can do this work wherever you are.
Selling secondhand clothing on apps has been so successful that it now has its own name: recommerce. Start by cleaning out your closet. Then browse yard sales, clearance racks and local thrift stores for pieces to sell for a profit in your fashionable side hustle.
This is one of the easiest ways to earn $100 quickly. You just need in-demand products that are priced to sell.
You can do more than market products and services online. It’s also possible to earn money on a website in 2021, especially if you use a website to sell merchandise or set appointments for services. These are some of the best ways to earn money online.
If you have an artistic side, consider selling handcrafted items on Etsy or another site to make money off your hobby. Some of the trending items on the platform include products that support specific communities, home goods, self-care and activities.
Create online video courses and earn money from students. For example, you can teach students how to play the ukulele, meditate or use a software program. Online platforms, such as Udemy, help aspiring teachers find paying students, mostly adults and professionals, in their chosen disciplines. A second site, Outschool, is for students up to age 18.
On Udemy, U.S. course prices start at $9.99 for students. Instructors earn between 37% and 97% of the revenue share. At Outschool, the teachers set the price for their courses, and the site takes a 30% service fee.
Selling graphic T-shirts is a big business. Sites such as Teespring, allow you to design and sell these shirts for a profit. You can increase your profit margin through Teespring’s pricing discount, which triggers as you sell more and more shirts.
There’s a growing demand for customized T-shirts. Companies use them to increase brand awareness among their target market. Custom T-shirts also meet a need in the fashion industry among consumers striving to show support for a cause.
When you first start out seeking online opportunities, you simply might be looking for how to make money online. But a few gigs here and there won’t give you a sustainable stream of income.
The best way to earn money online is to find a way you can support, sustain and scale your services or products over time. For many companies, the ultimate measure of success is giving customers what they want. As long as you meet a need, you will get customers. And some of those customers will give you repeat business and even referrals, which will help you grow your client base.
Jami Farkas, Taylor Bell, Grace Lin and Bill Pirriglia contributed to the reporting for this article.
This article has been updated with additional reporting since its original publication.
Our in-house research team and on-site financial experts work together to create content that’s accurate, impartial, and up to date. We fact-check every single statistic, quote and fact using trusted primary resources to make sure the information we provide is correct. You can learn more about GOBankingRates’ processes and standards in our editorial policy.

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Northants teenager with cancer thanks those who donated to fundraiser set up by best friend – Northampton Chronicle and Echo

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Northamptonshire 24/7 mental health hotline launched
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A fundraiser has been set up for a 19-year-old Northamptonshire woman whose cancer grew over Christmas, leaving her bed bound for her birthday.
At this time last year, Yami Moloteni, 19, was complaining of chest pains to her GP and she was told that it was likely she was suffering from long Covid. She was advised to take ibuprofen and assured that she would feel better soon. This was not the case.
Fast forward to June, just two days after being dismissed by another GP, she was rushed to A&E at Northampton General Hospital by her mum with a ‘massive’ pain in her chest.
She remained in hospital for two weeks and then a further eight days at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford as doctors scratched their heads, trying to figure out what was wrong.
A-Level results day in August loomed but Yami would not only be receiving her exam marks that day. A PET scan revealed she had stage two Hodgkin Lymphoma – an uncommon cancer that develops in the lymphatic system, which is a network of vessels and glands spread throughout the body.
Yami said: “I already knew that it was cancer but I thought I could still go to university so the results day came around and they said there is no chance of you going to university this year. It was horrible because all my friends were like, ‘I’m going to university’ and I was like, ‘I’m going to hospital.'”
Yami had to defer her university course for a year and now she has to routinely travel to Oxford for treatment. Her chemotherapy started in September 2021, which caused her long waist-length hair to start coming out in ‘clumps.’
Her mother had to stop working for three months to support Yami and her dad worked night shifts to ensure her younger sisters, aged five and nine, were looked after.
Talking about the impact Yami’s diagnosis had on her sisters, she said: “My five-year-old sister – she’s still quite little so doesn’t really know what’s going on but, for my nine-year-old sister, it was horrible for her because it was like, ‘when are you coming home’ and she was so upset when I lost my hair. That was really tough for them as well.”
On December 30, Yami was rushed back into hospital as she was struggling to breathe. A subsequent scan showed that her cancer had doubled in size.
The original plan was to have her latest round of chemotherapy after her nineteenth birthday on January 13 but this latest revelation meant that she had to be bed bound on her special day. A close friend did, however, make sure to throw her a surprise party to make up for it.
Yami, on her rounds of chemotherapy, said: “You don’t realise how it has an impact on every day life – like, my mum being able to wake up and go to work but she has to check up on me.
“The first three weeks when I have chemo are the worst. I am in bed and mum is bringing me food then you have a week off and that’s great and you get your energy back but then, the week after, it is three days of chemo again.”
Yami’s best friend, Amelia Skippen, launched a fundraiser to help raise much needed money to cover the costs of Yami’s trips to Oxford, childcare for her younger sisters so that her parents can be with her whenever possible and donations to the cancer charities who have helped Yami and her family throughout her treatment.
Amelia said: “This has been such a horrible time for the whole family, especially with Covid, meaning we have rarely been able to see Yami and, when we have seen her, it’s been from a distance.
“Nobody should have to face cancer alone, particularly at such a young age. So please, if you can reach in to your pockets to help these guys have a better year, it would be massively appreciated.
“Yami should have also been at university this year but has had to have a year out to try and fix her health. Please help us help her achieve her dream and get her to university.”
Amelia set up the fundraiser as a surprise for her best friend, Yami, who expressed delight and gratitude when she found out that the GoFundMe page has already accumulated £130 in donations as of January 18, 2022.
In a message to those who have kindly donated to the fundraiser so far, Yami said: “I can’t even say thank you enough because these people don’t even know me and, out of everyone they could help, they chose to help me – it’s such a humbling experience. I am so grateful to everyone.
“It is one of the most common cancers for people of my age and I didn’t even know that. I want to raise awareness for it as well.”
Hodgkin lymphoma can develop at any age but it mostly affects people aged between 20 and 40 years and those over 75. Slightly more men than women are affected, according to the NHS.Around 2,100 people are diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma in the UK each year.
To find out more about Yami’s fundraiser or make a donation, visit the GoFundMe page.

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