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Teenagers in The Times: October 2021 – The New York Times

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Our roundup of the news stories and features about young people that have recently appeared across sections of NYTimes.com.
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Here is the October edition of Teenagers in The Times, a roundup of the news and feature stories about young people that have recently appeared across sections of NYTimes.com. We publish a new edition on the first Thursday of each month.
For ideas about how to use Teenagers in The Times with your students, please see our lesson plan and special activity sheet, both of which can be used with this or any other edition.
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Christian Schools Boom in a Revolt Against Curriculum and Pandemic Rules
With public schools on the defensive, is this a blip or a ‘once-in-100-year moment for the growth of Christian education’?
‘This Drop Came So Quickly’: Shrinking Schools Add to Hong Kong Exodus
The Chinese territory is experiencing its biggest population drop in decades as residents flee political repression and a new “patriotic” curriculum.
The Fight to Ban Books
Critical race theory battles hit libraries.
With Masks On or Off, Schools Try to Find the New Normal
Despite some turmoil, a vast majority of students have been in classrooms full-time and mostly uninterrupted this fall. Now, educators debate what’s next.
How Students Fought a Book Ban and Won, for Now
Hundreds of students, parents and residents in York County, Pa., protested limits on books told from the perspective of gay, Black and Latino children.
De Blasio to Phase Out N.Y.C. Gifted and Talented Program
The mayor unveiled a plan to replace the highly selective program, which has become a glaring symbol of segregation in New York City public schools, for incoming students. It will be up to his successor to implement it.
The Hot New Back-to-School Accessory? An Air Quality Monitor.
Parents are sneaking carbon dioxide monitors into their children’s schools to determine whether the buildings are safe.

The School That Aspires to Be a Basketball Factory (Not That Kind)
The Earl Monroe New Renaissance Basketball School opened its doors in September in the Bronx with an unusual focus for a charter school: career paths related to the game.
All California Public High School Students Will Soon Have to Take Ethnic Studies
The requirement, the first in the nation, was signed into law by Gov. Gavin Newsom this month.
How Should We Teach Students About Inequality?
This Opinion essay offers a look at California’s ethnic studies requirement.
School District to Pay $25 Million to Parkland Shooting Victims
The settlement comes more than three years after the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., when 17 people were killed.
Utah School District Ignored Racial Harassment for Years, Report Says
Black and Asian American students were often called racial slurs, while teachers and staff members ignored their complaints, the Justice Department found.
The Student Body Is Deaf and Diverse. The School’s Leadership Is Neither.
More than 30 years after a groundbreaking protest at Gallaudet University in Washington, questions about leadership at a school for the deaf in Atlanta have been further compounded by race.
A School Mural Was Supposed to Celebrate Black Lives. Instead, It Was Destroyed.
Artwork intended to reflect on social justice and racial equity has exposed long-simmering tensions in a Brooklyn public school.
Taliban Allow Girls to Return to Some High Schools, but With Big Caveats
In some provinces, teenage girls have been allowed to return to secondary schools, though some teachers and parents still have doubts about what this means about Taliban rule.
Students Use the Los Angeles Marathon as a Way to Keep Going
Over the past three decades, more than 50,000 students have trained for and completed the Los Angeles Marathon.
Some Student-Athletes Are Getting Paid. College Sports Live On.
Since July, the N.C.A.A. has allowed athletes to make money from endorsement deals. Fans don’t seem to mind.
The Difference Between an Unpaid and a Paid Student-Athlete? Not Much.
Since July, the N.C.A.A. has allowed athletes to make money from endorsement deals. Fans don’t seem to mind.
His N.B.A. Dream Was Right There. Then He Couldn’t Move His Legs.
A mysterious illness on the eve of the 2019 N.B.A. draft derailed Kris Wilkes’s hopes of going pro. As he heals, he’s not giving up hope.
Headgear Reduces Concussions in High School Girls’ Lacrosse, Study Shows
A University of Florida study includes data from roughly 350,000 games and practices in more than 30 states. Headgear for girls has been mandated in Florida since 2015, and remains hotly debated.
Emma Raducanu, After U.S. Open Win, Keeps Her Feet on the Ground
The 18-year-old returns to the court at the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, Calif., as a headliner, richer and more famous. She still needed a wild card.
The Next Generation of Men’s Tennis
Fixing this and that in their games, these 10 players could join the elite.
Transgender Athletes Face Bans From Girls’ Sports in 10 U.S. States
Over the past two years, nine states have enacted laws to bar transgender girls and women from competing in girls’ and women’s sports. Another relied on an executive order for a ban.
Pfizer-BioNTech’s vaccine is highly effective against hospitalization for those 12 to 18, a study shows.
The C.D.C. looked at children hospitalized with Covid-19 or other illnesses, and found those who were immunized to be far more protected.
A New Vaccine Strategy for Children: Just One Dose, for Now
Myocarditis, a rare side effect, occurs mostly after the second dose. So in some countries, officials are trying out single doses for children.
How to Talk to Teens About Edibles
Pot brownies and colorful gummies may look harmless and can be easy to hide, but it’s important for caregivers to help adolescents understand the risks.
Eating Disorders and Social Media Prove Difficult to Untangle
Social media platforms like TikTok and Instagram try to monitor for content related to the problem, but it is not always clear what to do about it.
Instagram Struggles With Fears of Losing Its ‘Pipeline’: Young Users
The app, hailed as Facebook’s growth engine, has privately wrestled with retaining and engaging teenagers, according to internal documents.
Does Instagram Harm Girls? No One Actually Knows.
“The findings of psychological research are inconclusive,” writes the author of this Opinion essay.
For Teen Girls, Instagram Is a Cesspool
“Facebook’s internal research suggesting that social media is harming teenage girls will not surprise anyone who is or has been a teenage girl,” writes the author of this Opinion essay.
Teenage girls say Instagram’s mental health impacts are no surprise.
Among young people, the idea that Instagram can hurt someone’s self-image is widely discussed.
Facebook Wants the Young People Back
The social media giant is making bonkers money. But it aims to turn itself inside out to get more young people.
Anonymity No More? Age Checks Come to the Web.
To protect children online, more companies and governments are forcing users to prove how old they are.
Queen of the Internet
Meet Brooklyn Queen, a Gen Z artist and Renaissance woman.
New York Has a New Band of Buzzy Post-Punk Teens: Geese
The Brooklyn quintet thought the band would end after high school graduation. Now its debut album, “Projector,” is arriving.
90s Sitcoms Shaped Me as an Immigrant Child. What if They Hadn’t?
As a young girl, I emulated characters from shows like “Saved by the Bell” to act American. If only “Never Have I Ever” and“Ramy” had been around back then.
‘Squid Game’ Halloween Costumes Are Banned by Several New York Schools
Others have issued warnings to parents, citing concerns about the show’s violent content.
Their Family Movie Nights Can Get a Little Bloody
How a 17-year-old model, her sister and parents began making horror films on their compound in the Catskills.
A Polish Rapper Goes From Scandal to Superstar
Michal Matczak, better known as Mata, has been called the voice of Polish youth for songs about teen struggles that have grabbed the attention of his politically divided country.

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TikTok Live Gifts: How Can TikTokers Earn Diamonds, Exchange It For Money? – iTech Post

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TikTok creators can now earn real money through their live streams! Supporters can give their favorite streamers TikTok live gifts, and that helps them earn virtual diamonds.
TikTok is a popular video platform that features quick clips over diverse genres. TikTok is not limited to the topic of discussion, but it cuts most of its content short, helping viewers save up their time when watching the videos.
Due to its massive popularity, many grew interested in the platform. Both streamers and creators gather to create communities and improve their influence through it. Now, some are wonderinging if they could earn money through the platform.
TikTok creators and streamers need to follow strict regulations on the platform. Also, there are many different rules to understand when earning and converting the TikTok currency. 
According to Screenrant, TikTok creators need 1000 followers before they could access TikTok live. Users need to be 16 years old and above to host their livestream. Hosts also need to provide permission for all the viewers to join the live stream, so it is best to advertise the event beforehand.
To clarify, TikTok users need to earn diamonds, which will be converted to real money. They will earn their diamonds through live gifts, which takes its value based on 50 percent of the spending amount. TikTok takes the other 50 percent as a commission fee. It takes 200 Diamonds to reach $1.
Advertisemint gave a situation of TikTok encashment. For example, a viewer gifted a steamer the Drama Queen virtual gift, which is worth 5000 coins. The streamer should automatically earn 2500 diamonds, which equates to $12.5 withdrawable money.
To emphasize conversion rates, YouTuber Davison highlighted the following:
It is important to note that all TikTok currency uses USD in its exchange regardless of server.

Read Also: Hurricane Ida Power Outage Map from Space: Devastation Seen from NASA Satellite, Electricity Restoration Will Be A Long Process
Viewers who want to support their favorite TikTok streamer have to send out virtual gifts during livestream.
First, however, viewers need to buy virtual coins to purchase their virtual gifts. They can do so by opening “Settings,” heading to “Balance,” and clicking on “Recharge.” At the time of writing, the current coin conversion rate was 100 coins for $1.39, 500 coins for $6.99, 2000 coins for $27.99, and 5000 coins for $69.99.
After loading up some coins, supporters can now buy virtual gifts. Some of the available choices are:
To send these gifts, simply join TikTok Live and scroll down to the Gift button in the comments section. Here users can choose the gifts and click “Send.” Users can also simultaneously recharge coins and buy new gifts even during livestream.
TikTok can change these exchange rates at any moment based on their own discretion.
Related Article: NASA Asteroid Warning 2021: Where to Track Statue of Liberty-Sized Asteroid, Close Approach Date and More Details
© 2022 iTech Post All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.
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Moving money beyond borders – The Star Online

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How To Thrive Amid Digital Disruption – Forbes

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Business achievement concept with happy businesswoman relaxing in office or hotel room, resting and … [+] raising fists with ambition looking forward to city building urban scene through glass window
Four articles in the January/February 2022 issue of Harvard Business Review (HBR) argued that “many people” are wrong in thinking that “old-economy companies” are “doomed to suffer a slow demise.” The articles had a point in that most “old-economy companies” have found ways to survive, “in some shape or form”, and have not yet died from digital disruption. But if we look at the bigger picture of what it takes to thrive, not just survive, the challenge for most firms still lies ahead. In part 1 of this article, I summarized the four HBR articles. Here (Part 2) I present a framework to thrive amid digital disruption.
To begin, let’s define “digital disruption”. Digital disruption is not a disease afflicting “old-economy companies.”
“Digital disruption” is nothing less than a symptom of the birth of a new economic age, with a transition akin to that the agricultural age to the industrial era. The new age flows from the combination of exponential new technologies and new management principles, which in turn lead to massive new value creation. “Digital disruption” can be defined as a failure to take advantage of this opportunity: see Figure 1 below.
“Digital technologies” include at least 18 major technologies that together have the potential to reinvent almost everything we do for the better: see Figure 2 below. Anything that is slow, inconvenient, difficult, expensive, unpleasant or impersonal can in principle be transformed by these technologies into something that is cheaper, easier, more convenient, speedier, more agreeable, and more relevant to the user’s need,
As a result, firms that have mastered the new technologies and the elated management principles have already transformed parts of our lives, including how we work, how we communicate, how we shop, how we play, how we read, how we entertain ourselves, in short, how we live. In our actions, as consumers we have spoken. Firms have shown that it makes more money. There is no going back. This is the future.
Most firms have only scratched the surface of the potential of the new technologies. That’s in part because the technologies are often unfamiliar to executives at all levels, particularly the top, and in part because organizations have not made the transition to the new management principles.
The management principles of the prior era—the industrial era—involved mass production, mass distribution, mass consumption, mass education, mass media, mass recreation, and mass entertainment. These things combined with standardization, centralization, concentration, and synchronization, to produce the management system known as bureaucracy. Bureaucracy created huge benefits for humanity over several centuries, But bureaucracy isn’t fast, or agile, enough exploit the new digital technologies. Moreover, by treating human beings as cogs in a machine, bureaucracy dehumanized the workforce.
The management principles for the digital age are shown in Figure 3 below and include the following. Instead of starting from what the firm can produce that might be sold to customers, firms work backwards from customers’ needs and then figure out how to meet them in a sustainable way. Instead of leadership located mainly at the top, leadership, and an obsession with profitably creating fresh value for customers, is nurtured throughout the firm. Instead of tight control of individuals reporting to bosses, staff throughout the organization create value by working in teams with short cycles, drawing on their own capacities and imagination. Instead of steep hierarchies of authority, firms need to operate in interactive networks of competence, where ideas can come from anywhere, even from outside the firm. For most firms, these are deep changes.
Firms that have mastered the new management principles and the new technologies can move more quickly, interact more understandingly, operate more efficiently, mobilize more resources, attract more talent and use it more effectively, win over customers more readily, enjoy more elevated market capitalizations, and compete more overwhelmingly than firms being run on industrial-era principles.
Thus it’s not just individual firms that are being toppled. This is something more fundamental: the central management tenets of the industrial era are being upended. A new spirit of individual creativity and innovation is being generated.
The transition from industrial-era, to digital-age, management is occurring at different speeds in different sectors. As with any exponential transition, change tends to happen gradually and then suddenly. Stasis can hide imminent shocks.
Conversely, when one or more of these principles is not fully embraced, or is set aside, even an advanced digital-age firm may revert to industrial-era levels of performance. Both technology and management are needed: digitization without different management typically makes little difference.
The most-used label for the new era is “the Digital Age”, although the label can mistakenly be taken to imply that the digital era is only about new technology. Figure 4 lists 13 alternative labels.
Each of these alternative labels deals with one facet of the new age. “Digital age” has three key advantages. It correctly suggests that the new age affects everyone. Second, it is already the most commonly used label, and third: most firms want it: they are trying to implement digital transformations.
Yet not everything about the new age is positive. As with any basic change, the new age harms those not willing or able to embrace it or master its implications. Some large firms have abused their market power and committed other missteps.
Society is still groping for a balanced picture of the costs and benefits. A framework is needed to provide a coherent picture for a balanced assessment. While fresh digital-era regulations are obviously needed, along with clear rules for digital commerce, and redress of any missteps already taken, it would be economic and political suicide for regulators to kneecap the digital winners. If the digital winners are smart, they will take steps to regulate themselves.
In an age of rapid innovation, if firms don’t embrace the principles and technologies of the digital age, some other firm will do it for them and in due course put them out of business. As a sign of this harsh reality, breakups of the old industrial behemoths are becoming increasingly frequent: GE, J&J, IBM, and Toshiba are just the most recent examples. They are surviving, but not thriving.
For large firms, the transition will require deep change and will take time. It means setting aside entrenched systems, approaches, practices, values and attitudes that served firms well in the industrial-era. It means senior executives understanding, internalizing, and communicating unfamiliar ways of operating. It means adapting the technology and the management to the context of each individual firm. Copy-and-paste directives don’t work. Consultants can help, but ultimately the top leadership itself has to live, breathe, and exemplify the new mode of operating.
All firms must acquire the new capabilities if they are to thrive, not just survive. If they understand what is involved, there is no reason why they can’t succeed. The pain that they feel in making the transition is not the pain of dying. It is the pain of being born.
And read also, in addition to Part 1 of this article:
How Management Mediocrity Is Celebrated As Success
Why Digital Transformations Are Failing
Figure 1 Defining Digital Disruption
Figure 2: Technologies of the digital age

Figure 3 The promise of the digital age
Figure 4: Digital Age management principles

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