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AMD Ryzen gaming PCs and CPUs are being targeted by cryptocurrency miners – PCGamesN

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It’s almost impossible to find some of the best graphics cards on digital shelves right now, with ongoing chip shortages, unprecedented levels of demand, and even some Fast & Furious style shenanigans affecting supply. Unfortunately, the rise of a new cryptocurrency ‘Raptoreum’ could see these same issues affect the availability of AMD CPUs.
AMD’s Ryzen 9 3000 and 5000 processors have been identified (via Videocardz) as some of the best chips to mine the cryptocurrency, as their 64MB of L3 cache is able to handily manage the workloads required by the Raptoreum mining method.
The Ryzen 9 5900X ranks among some of the best gaming CPUs you can slot into a gaming PC today, and increased demand from miners could see the processor’s availability suffer and its price skyrocket, alongside other AMD Ryzen 9 chips. Worse still, the upcoming Zen 4 Ryzen 6000 components due next year could be affected to a greater degree, as they are rumoured to feature 192MB of L3 cache.
Both AMD and Intel have not implemented any mining performance limiters on their CPUs or GPUs, with both companies stating they have no immediate plans to do so. Meanwhile, crypto miners are continuing to look for new ways to circumvent the lite hash rate rate (LHR) limiters implemented by Nvidia on its RTX 3000 GPUs, with some success.
It’s likely that team green will carry over the same LHR limiting technology on to its upcoming RTX 4000 GPUs, but it remains to be seen if the rumoured gaming performance translates in any meaningful way to the cards’ mining capabilities. Regardless, we won’t have to wait long to find out as leaks point to a 2022 release date for Nvidia’s new graphics cards.
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Samuel Willetts Hardware Writer
Published: Nov 11, 2021
Samuel can’t remember a time when PC hardware wasn’t a part of his life and feels right at home with his hands inside the guts of a rig. He’s previously written for PCGamer, StartMenu, Redbrick, T3, and TopTenReviews.

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Sony to keep making PlayStation 4 as PS5 output hits snag – New York Post

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Sony’s plans to mass produce its new PlayStation 5 gaming console have been put on hold because of disruptions in the global supply chain — forcing the company to keep cranking out its older PS4 systems.
The Japanese tech giant had initially planned to phase out manufacturing of PS4 at the end of last year and move to a full transition to its newer consoles, according to Bloomberg. But now it is pivoting to produce as many as 1 million of the old models in 2022.
After introducing the PS5 in November 2020, supply has been scarce due to shortages in advanced chips and other commodities needed to mass produce the hardware.
This past November, Sony reduced its PS5 production outlook. Initially, it aimed to make more than 16 million units in the year ending in March, but that number was trimmed to 14.8 million.
The older PS4 is cheaper to make and uses less advanced chips and software than its successor. Released in 2013, the PS4 has sold more than 116 million units and remains popular among gamers.
The PS5, which offers more sophisticated graphics and faster loading times than the PS4, was also met with great fanfare. As of September 2021, it has sold 13.3 million total units — surpassing the 7.6 million units that the PS4 sold in its first year of availability nearly a decade ago.
Sony told assembly partners late last year that it is pivoting to manufacture more PS4 consoles this year, though a company spokesperson denied that it had planned to discontinue production altogether.
“It is one of the best-selling consoles ever and there is always crossover between generations,” a spokesperson told Bloomberg.
This past fall, Sony reported a 27% increase in sales in its gaming division for the three-month fiscal quarter that ended on Sept. 30. The firm credited the popularity of the PS5.
In total, the Japanese conglomerate’s gaming division recorded $5.7 billion in sales during the three month period starting in July. Operating income fell 21% to $727 million while the company generated $10.8 billion in revenue.
Sony isn’t the only gaming company that is relying on its older technologies to keep profits flowing during the supply chain crunch.
Last year, Nvidia, the US firm that makes processing units for gaming consoles, revived its previous generation of GTX 1050 Ti graphics cards due to the shortage in semiconductors.
While the company never officially discontinued production of the card, it was not listed for sale as recently as November 2020.
The card was first introduced in 2016, but was gradually phased out in favor of the newer 16-series cards, according to PC Gamer.
Market observers say that the supply chain crisis and chip shortages will likely last through this year.
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Daily Deals: Save on Select PS5, PS4 Games Today – IGN

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Daily Deals: Save on Select PS5, PS4 Games Today  IGN
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Most Popular Online Casino Games In Australia – Spiel Times

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Most Popular Online Casino Games In Australia  Spiel Times
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