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Corsair HS80 RGB Wireless review: The most comfortable PS5 headset yet – Android Central

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Corsair HS80 RGB Wireless reviewSource: Harish Jonnalagadda / Android Central
Corsair is doing all the right things when it comes to headsets. The Virtuoso RGB Wireless XT is easily one of the best PS5 headsets available today, and the brand has a range of solid options targeted at various price points.
With the HS80 RGB Wireless, Corsair is rolling out its most comfortable headset yet. I used the most recent launches in the Virtuoso series and the Xbox-focused HS75, and the HS80 is just in a league of its own when it comes to comfort. The more gaming headsets I use, the more I realize that comfort is the biggest factor in extended use — at least for me.
In that regard, the HS80 outshines its immediate rivals. But that’s not the only area where Corsair’s latest headset wins out; it has the same Slipstream tech that allows for low-latency wireless connectivity, Dolby Atmos and spatial sound, and an omnidirectional mic that is outstanding. Corsair ticked all the right boxes here, and you can use the HS80 with Windows or plug the USB receiver into your PS5 or PS4 and get a wireless gaming headset that is one of the best around.
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Bottom line: The HS80 RGB Wireless nails the basics; you get fantastic sound quality, one of the best mics available in this category, and rock-solid wireless connectivity. Combine that with a design that’s comfortable for extended gaming sessions, and you have a truly standout choice if you’re looking for a gaming headset for your PS5.
Corsair HS80 RGB Wireless reviewCorsair HS80 RGB Wireless reviewSource: Harish Jonnalagadda / Android Central
The HS80 is now available in most markets where Corsair has an official presence. The headset costs $150 in the U.S., $200 in Canada, the equivalent of $150 in most parts of Latin America, €150 ($172) in Europe, ¥1,099 Yuan ($171) in China, $219 in Australia, and New Zealand, and $179 in Southeast Asia. It’s sold in a single color option and backed by Corsair’s standard two-year warranty.
Corsair HS80 RGB Wireless reviewCorsair HS80 RGB Wireless reviewSource: Harish Jonnalagadda / Android Central
The differentiator for the HS80 RGB Wireless is the comfort, so I’ll start there. The headset has a floating headband design that better distributes the weight, so even though the HS80 comes in at 367g and has more clamping force than the Virtuoso XT, it feels lighter.
The angled design and fabric ear pads make the HS80 extremely comfortable in daily use.
The earcups are angled as well — unlike most Corsair headsets — and at least for my use case, they fit my ears better than the rounded designs that the brand is known for. But what I like the most is the fabric earpads; they’re much more comfortable than the faux leather that Corsair uses in its other gaming headsets. The fabric is much more breathable, and that makes a big difference in extended gaming sessions.
While there are a few things the HS80 does differently, it has the same durability as other Corsair headsets. It’s made out of machined aluminum, and in the two months I used it, I didn’t notice any issues with the build quality. The earcups fold flat, but the design doesn’t allow them to be folded — these aren’t built for portable or outdoor use.
Source: Harish Jonnalagadda / Android Central
You don’t get a lot of design flair here, but the matte finish feels good in day-to-day use, and the aluminum chassis should last several years without any issues. Of course, as is now the case with most Corsair headsets, the HS80 has an illuminated logo that can be configured via iCUE.
The HS80 doesn’t have much in the way of controls; there’s a power button and volume knob on the left earcup, and that’s pretty much it. You’ll also find the boom mic on the left, and while it isn’t detachable, it doesn’t get in the way when you’re not using it. Unfortunately, there’s no mute switch for the mic, but it is activated when you flip it down and automatically muted once you flit it back up to its default position. There’s also an LED indicator — white for when it’s active and red for muted. The mic quality itself is one of the best around, and it is on par with the Virtuoso XT.
Corsair HS80 RGB Wireless reviewCorsair HS80 RGB Wireless reviewSource: Harish Jonnalagadda / Android Central
As for the audio quality, the HS80 features the same 50mm neodymium drivers that you’ll find in the costlier Virtuoso XT, and it sounds fantastic. The headset has a warm soundstage that’s great for gaming, and playing laidback adventure games like Abzû was delightful. It also held up incredibly well during action sequences in Control and Star Wars: Squadrons, delivering powerful sound without missing any little nuances. You also get an equalizer in iCUE’s settings, so you can easily adjust the sound profile. The software lets you tweak settings for the mic and switch off the RGB lighting for the logo.
A big part of what makes the HS80 work is Corsair’s Slipstream wireless tech, which is prioritized for low latency. As a result, you never get the feeling that you’re wearing a wireless headset; there’s no audio lag whatsoever, and connectivity itself is rock-solid.
If you’re using the headset with Windows, you get Dolby Atmos spatial sound. You can enable it via the settings, and the feature does an excellent job with positional awareness. I’m not a big fan of virtual surround, so I didn’t use the feature all that much, but if you want to try it out, you can do so on Windows. PS5 gamers miss out on this feature, though.
Corsair HS80 RGB Wireless reviewCorsair HS80 RGB Wireless reviewSource: Harish Jonnalagadda / Android Central
Corsair says the HS80 can last up to 20 hours on a full charge, but it averaged just over 13 hours in my usage. This is in line with the Virtuoso XT, but the HS80 falls short of rivals from other brands in this particular area. Charging the headset itself is as effortless as possible — it has a USB-C port, but it lacks any form of fast charging, so you will need to leave it plugged in for a few hours to fully charge.
Corsair Virtuoso RGB Wireless XT reviewCorsair Virtuoso RGB Wireless XT reviewSource: Harish Jonnalagadda / Android Central
If you like what the HS80 offers but want a few extras like Bluetooth connectivity, the Virtuoso XT is the ideal option. It uses the same low latency to connect wirelessly to the PS5, sounds incredible, and has Dolby Atmos if you’re interested in using it with Windows. The downside is that at $270, it is significantly costlier.
If you’re looking for a headset similarly priced to the HS80, the SteelSeries Arctis 7P is the obvious choice. You get amazing audio quality, reliable wireless connectivity, adjustable EQ, and with 24-hour battery life, you’ll only have to charge it once a week.
Corsair HS80 RGB Wireless reviewCorsair HS80 RGB Wireless reviewSource: Harish Jonnalagadda / Android Central
The HS80 RGB Wireless delivers everything you’re looking for in a gaming headset; it has excellent sound quality, a durable design, one of the best mics around, and most of all, it is very comfortable even for extended gaming sessions. The battery doesn’t last quite as long as some of the other headsets in this category, but with 13 hours between charges, you’ll only have to charge it a few times a week.

Corsair has distilled the fundamentals of the Virtuoso XT into a more affordable package. When you factor in the added comfort, the HS80 is one of the best gaming headsets available today.
Bottom line: With fantastic sound quality, reliable wireless connectivity, and a great mic, the HS80 nails the basics. The design is comfortable for all-day use, the durable construction means the headset will last several years, and all things considered, this is one of the best gaming headsets for the PS5.
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Harish Jonnalagadda is the Asia Editor at Android Central. A reformed hardware modder, he now spends his time writing about India’s technology revolution. Previously, he used to ponder the meaning of life at IBM. Contact him on Twitter at @chunkynerd.

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Nvidia: Quantitatively Speaking Still Overvalued – Seeking Alpha

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Graphics Chip Maker Nvidia Reports Quarterly Earnings

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images News

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images News
This is my first article about NVIDIA (NASDAQ:NVDA). I readily admit that I do not fully understand the specifics of the company and what investors see hidden in it. Therefore, at this stage, I offer a comprehensive, quantitative analysis of the company’s fundamental value.
The easiest way to get a first idea of the adequacy of the company’s current price is to look at the dynamics of its capitalization in the context of the dynamics of key results. As a rule, this allows you to identify persistent regressions.
Based on the long-term relationship between the revenue TTM absolute size and the company’s capitalization, NVIDIA’s current price is somewhat overvalued:

NVIDIA market cap vs revenue

VisualizedAnalytics

VisualizedAnalytics
The same is true for the relationship based on the EPS TTM absolute size:

Nvidia market cap vs EPS

VisualizedAnalytics

VisualizedAnalytics
On the other side, over the past seven years, NVIDIA has shown a direct relationship between the rate of revenue growth and its P/S multiple. It should be noted that there is no similar qualitative relationship between EPS and earnings growth rate. In my opinion, this means that the rate of revenue growth is now a key driver of capitalization.

Nvidia P/S vs revenue

VisualizedAnalytics

VisualizedAnalytics
In the context of the last model, the company is now also overvalued. But more importantly, the expectation of a decrease in the revenue growth rate indicates a potential decrease in the P/S multiple in the coming quarters.
So, having determined that revenue is a key driver of company capitalization, we can build a general model that determines the company’s balanced price:

Nvidia modeled price

VisualizedAnalytics

Nvidia modeled price

VisualizedAnalytics

VisualizedAnalytics
VisualizedAnalytics
Under this approach, NVIDIA’s modeled capitalization is lower than the actual one within about two standard deviations. And the nearest forecast also does not justify the current price of the company.
Using elements of machine learning, I analyzed many options for comparative assessment of NVIDIA through multiples. As a result, I found only three models that allow a more or less reasonable judgment of the relative value of the company. To my surprise, all of these models are based on growth-adjusted multiples. This suggests that growth is a determining factor in the level of NVIDIA multiples.
A comparative valuation of NVIDIA through the forward P/E (next FY) to growth multiple indicates that the company is undervalued by 18%. But the quality of this model is not high enough:

Nvidia comparative valuation via PEG

VisualizedAnalytics

Nvidia comparative valuation via PEG

VisualizedAnalytics

VisualizedAnalytics
VisualizedAnalytics
Considering the EV/Revenue to growth multiple, NVIDIA seems expensive:

Nvidia comparative valuation via EV/Revenue

VisualizedAnalytics

Nvidia comparative valuation via EV/Revenue

VisualizedAnalytics

VisualizedAnalytics
VisualizedAnalytics
The same is true for the EV/EBITDA multiple:

Nvidia comparative valuation via EV/EBITDA

VisualizedAnalytics

Nvidia comparative valuation via EV/EBITDA

VisualizedAnalytics

VisualizedAnalytics
VisualizedAnalytics
Judging by the proposed multiples, I cannot make an unambiguous conclusion. The only thing that can be stated is that the company’s growth rate is a determining factor in the level of NVIDIA multiples. The slowdown should significantly reduce the level of its multiples.
When predicting NVIDIA’s revenue for the next ten years, I proceeded from the average expectations of analysts. According to consensus forecasts, in the next decade, the company’s annual revenue will exceed $160 billion.
NVIDIA’s operating margin has reached 35% in the last quarter. This is close to the historical maximum of the company. But the model is based on the assumption that the operating margin over the next 10 years will gradually decline to 30% in the terminal year. This is a standard approach based on the likely increase in competition.

Nvidia operating margin chart
Data by YCharts

Here is the calculation of the Weighted Average Cost of Capital:

NVIDIA WACC

VisualizedAnalytics

VisualizedAnalytics
Some explanations:
Here’s the model itself:

NVIDIA DCF model

VisualizedAnalytics

VisualizedAnalytics
(in high resolution)
The DCF-based target price of NVIDIA’s shares is $233, offering 12% downside. At the same time, in my opinion, I considered a relatively positive scenario for the future development of the company.
Looking at NVIDIA in the context of free cash flow, I want to draw your attention to one important indicator – the free cash flow yield. It shows how much the company generates free cash flow per dollar of its market price.
Free Cash Flow Yield = Free Cash Flow TTM / Market Capitalization
I compared this figure of NVIDIA with other technology companies and closest competitors. Alas, the company’s figure is the lowest:

Nvidia vs other tech stocks free cash flow
Data by YCharts

The free cash flow that NVIDIA generates for every dollar of its capitalization is about 1%. This is lower than the US 10-year treasury yield. I don’t even compare with inflation. In general, this is a wake-up call for an investor.
From October to November last year, NVIDIA’s share price rose nearly 80%. During this period, two gaps were recorded. These gaps have defined strong support levels. And the first of these levels seems to have already been broken. In my opinion, before the level of the second support is reached, it is premature to talk about the completion of the correction.

Nvidia technical Chart

TradingView

TradingView
I do not share the optimism of those who believe that NVIDIA is an extremely attractive investment at its current price. I won’t jump to conclusions about the company’s long-term potential just yet, but it’s highly likely that the decline will continue in the short term.
This article was written by
Disclosure: I/we have no stock, option or similar derivative position in any of the companies mentioned, and no plans to initiate any such positions within the next 72 hours. I wrote this article myself, and it expresses my own opinions. I am not receiving compensation for it (other than from Seeking Alpha). I have no business relationship with any company whose stock is mentioned in this article.

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Sony's PlayStation Direct initiative will let lucky users buy 'limited' PS5 stock – TechRadar

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How to Watch UCLA vs. Utah in Men's College Basketball: Live Stream, TV Channel, Start Time – CalBearsMaven

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UCLA is 4-0 on the road this season and won four of its last five game against Utah. The Utes will need to play their best game of the season to have a chance at beating the Bruins. 
How to Watch UCLA vs. Utah in College Basketball Today:
Game Date: Jan. 20, 2022
Game Time: 11:00 p.m. ET
TV: FOX Sports 1
Live stream the UCLA vs. Utah game on fuboTV: Start with a 7-day free trial!
Utah (8-10, 1-7) lost in heartbreaking fashion against Arizona State in its last game. The Sun Devils hit a shot with 4.6 seconds remaining in the game to win 64-62. 
Three players scored in double figures, but the Utes have struggled on the offensive end the entire season. They have failed to score more than 70 points in five straight games. However, Utah will get a boost when leading scorer Branden Carlson, who is sidelined with an ankle injury, returns to the lineup.
Meanwhile, UCLA (11-2, 3-1) has been nearly impossible to beat since its loss to No. 1 Gonzaga in November. The only loss the Bruins have suffered came last Thursday in overtime against Oregon. They bounced back with an 81-65 win over Oregon State last Saturday, trailing for less than a minute in the game. 
Johnny Juzang leads UCLA with 17.2 points and 5.1 rebounds per game. The Bruins have been without Jaime Jaquez Jr., who is questionable for this contest.
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