Connect with us

Games

I’m Getting Extremely Tired Of My PS5’s Nonsense – Forbes

Published

on

(Photo by Phil Barker/Future Publishing via Getty Images)
Yesterday I was deemed some sort of beacon of Xbox superiority thanks to a Twitter rant I went on against PS5, the next gen console I’ve devoted almost all of my time to since I picked up both it and a Series X at launch.
And yet I keep running into small, but increasingly maddening issues with the PS5, and yesterday was exhibit A in terms of something that Xbox has clearly done better that PlayStation this generation.
When Xbox announced Smart Delivery, the ability to seamlessly upgrade last gen games to new gen, I didn’t think much of it. It just seemed like something you’d take for granted like yeah, sure, auto-downloading a new version and importing your cloud saves can’t be that tough, can it?
Turns out it can, if you’re Sony.
Avengers
In contrast to Microsoft’s “turn the game on and start playing” Smart Delivery concept, this has been the saga of moving from PS4 Avengers from PS5 Avengers.
1) I got my PS5, set it up, putting away my PS4 in the process. Turning on Avengers, my saves weren’t loaded. This is when I realized that Avengers (including other games like Sony’s own Spider-Man) still uses actual save files.
2) I found that PlayStation had not been auto-uploading saves to the cloud, so I needed to hook up my PS4 and do that. I tried to upload the saves, but the cloud system was broken. So I manually transferred them to a flash drive.
3) I imported the Avengers saves from the flash drive, which brought my hundreds of hours of gameplay to PS5. Later, I went back on PS4 and uploaded them to the cloud as well, just in case.
4) Skip ahead to the PS5 launch of Avengers, which is not an auto-download, but you have to dig into the store to find it, hidden in a menu, listed as a new version.
5) After a 75 GB download, I loaded it up to realize that again, my save files had not been carried over, only this time, I knew for a fact they were both in the cloud and literally on the console. But going through the storage menus, I saw no way to change them over to PS5 and overwrite the new save file that had been created.
6) I eventually found out you had to go back and load up the PS4 version of Avengers and launch a Save Migration tool. But first you had to download an 18 GB patch (with copying phase) for the PS4 version to even get that to show up. And I know many people (not me, mercifully) had already deleted their PS4 version of the game once they downloaded the PS5 version. Or they deleted it before that to make room for it.
7) Once all this was done, save migration….didn’t work. It was broken for the first few hours of release, eating into the time I’d carved out to play the next gen version with Hawkeye.
8) Finally, it worked, the PS5 version of the game has my PS4 save data. But I’m still scared to delete the PS4 version of the game because I mean, who knows, with all this nonsense.
And that’s what I keep running into with PS5, nonsense. The friend and party system is nonsense. The remapping of the functionality of the home button is nonsense. The fact that Sony had an entire generation to figure out a way to not have a “copying” phase, and they didn’t, is nonsense. Hell, I even think adaptive triggers (patched into Avengers now) are nonsense.
I have been playing everything on PS5 because I played everything on PS4, but there was much less nonsense with that console compared to this one. And what I’m realizing now is that I’m being drawn to the Xbox ecosystem which saw these problems from the outset and went out of its way to address them. I didn’t realize that something like Smart Delivery, which didn’t seem especially revolutionary at the time, would save me hours of annoyance because of how bad the alternative was, as expertly demonstrated by Sony.
It’s the little things that are just adding up for me, and my default brand loyalty is being tested. I have to stay on PS5 for my “big” game Destiny, at least until crossplay arrives, and of course for Sony’s first party offerings. But everything else? I think I’m done. Too much nonsense.
Follow me on TwitterYouTube, Facebook and Instagram.
Subscribe to my free weekly content round-up newsletter, God Rolls.
Pick up my sci-fi novels the Herokiller series, and The Earthborn Trilogy, which is also on audiobook.

source

Continue Reading
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Games

PlayStation Making New PS5 Triple-A Online Game – TheGamer

Published

on

No details have been announced, but we’ve dug through the job descriptions to piece things together.
PlayStation's London studio is currently hiring a team to get development underway for an upcoming online PS5 game. Based on the job descriptions, it seems the project is in the very early stages of development, so we likely won't see a trailer or even a name for a while yet.
What we do know is that this will be "an ambitious AAA project," one that will likely feature co-op gameplay and potentially some procedurally generated levels. The job descriptions also point to this being a live-service title, something Sony is currently lacking. There is Dreams, but that isn't triple-A, and Genshin Impact isn't on Xbox, but it's not a first-party game either.
RELATED: How Can Sony Compete With Xbox's Activision Blizzard Buyout?
The available roles range from leads with shipped titles under their belts to juniors just getting started, and even one that requires no games industry experience whatsoever. Each role also includes a clear commitment to increasing diversity across the studio, something that appears sorely needed if the almost all-white team photo on the website is anything to go by.
Many of the job listings require experience with online triple-A titles for console and PC, Unreal or Unity game engine knowledge, and procedural environment generation. There's also relatively standard stuff like character artists and AI programmers, so we can expect to be interacting with NPCs in the game.
One requirement for the lead level designer was "experience designing for online multiplayer combat," but whether that'll be PvP, PvE, or a mix of the two remains to be seen.
Each lead is expected to help build their own teams, and the studio is also hiring for an internal recruiter, so it looks like these hires are just the tip of the iceberg for the new project.
The appeal of PlayStation has always been its exclusives, so if this upcoming game is any good it could help PS5 sales stay even further ahead of the Xbox Series than they're predicted to be already. Sony's stock value plummeted by $20 billion after Microsoft's ABK purchase, so seeing new games are being worked on – especially in a genre as profitable online live-service – could ease shareholder fears.
Next: You Don't Know Fear Until Your Engine Has Malfunctioned On A Dark Country Road In Euro Truck Simulator
The power of word of mouth.
Issy is an avid film lover, writer, and game-player based in the UK. He combines his love of film and games in his writing, trying to find as many connections between the two mediums as possible. When he’s not writing, playing, or watching, Issy loves to DJ and look after his growing collection of houseplants, as they make him feel more adult.

source

Continue Reading

Games

The story on how John Madden came to be involved with wildly popular EA Sports NFL video game – USA TODAY

Published

on

If the creators of the NFL video game so many millions of people have played had their way, the wildly popular franchise would not have been known simply as Madden.
According to a story ESPN published in 2016, legendary coach and analyst John Madden was the third choice of Trip Hawkins, the eventual founder of video game maker Electronic Arts (EA), to be the pitchman of the game that eventually became Madden NFL. An avid football fan, Hawkins’ first choice was legendary Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Montana and former Vikings and Patriots quarterback and Cal Bears coach Joe Kapp.
Madden, who died at the age of 85 Tuesday, continues to be one of the game’s most prominent icons. He was first a player, though a knee injury in his rookie season in 1958 with the Philadelphia Eagles cut his career short. He went on to be the head coach of the Raiders, where he won a Super Bowl. He became a television analyst during NFL games and made the game accessible for millions of viewers. He was enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in the Class of 2006. 
But it’s his constant presence on the video game franchise, arguably, that serves as his strongest connection to new generations of football fans and gamers alike.
OPINION: John Madden will live forever because his influence was so great
MORE: ‘The road to Easy Street goes through the sewer’: John Madden quotes that will never be forgotten
According to ESPN, Montana could not be involved because he had a conflicting endorsement deal with video game console maker Atari, while Kapp wanted royalties. According to the article, Madden was so impressed with Hawkins’ credentials — he went to Harvard and worked at Apple — that he agreed to sign on.
It proved to be a shrewd decision. Despite slow production and years of releases before it became a household name, Madden NFL has generated more than $4 billion since its inception and has sold more than 130 million copies, according to EA. Barron’s estimates that Madden NFL generates around $600 million annually for EA.
Still, Madden lamented one major mistake that cost him millions more.
According to ESPN, after “John Madden Football” was released in 1988, Hawkins approached Madden and said EA was about to have an initial public offering and that Madden could “have as much stock” as he wanted, though he would have to pay the initial price of $7.50 per share.
“Hell, I’m just a football coach,” Madden told ESPN. “I pointed with my finger, all knowing, and said, ‘I gave you my time. I’m not giving you my money.’ I showed him!”
In only the 10 years from 1989 to 1999, the price soared to $70 per share, according to ESPN.
Said Madden: “That was the dumbest thing I ever did in my life.”
Originally, the game was planned as being a seven-on-seven competition, due to the limitations of computing back when it was being initially programmed. Madden, however, balked at that idea and wanted the game — if he was going to appear on its cover — to be as authentic as possible. 
“If it wasn’t real football, I didn’t want my name on it,” Madden told Grantland in January 2012. “I wanted it to be real football — pro football — with the sideline, the numbers, the hash marks. Everything had to be pro football.”
One other unique aspect of the game is how the plays and formations users can call and execute are taken directly from NFL playbooks. Madden sent a 1980 Oakland Raiders playbook to Hawkins and former EA producer Joe Ybarra.
To elaborate on that, the game’s producers sought to mimic the playbooks of the teams featured in the game.
“For our playbooks, I would say to (former San Francisco Examiner beat writer and consultant) Frank (Cooney), ‘Go find out what a team’s five signature plays are,’ ” Hawkins told ESPN. “He would go up to the assistant coaches, hand them paper. And they would draw up plays! We collected a huge amount of plays that way.”
The video game franchise has evolved over the years to incorporate new game play modes and features, as well as tweaks to game play. Its reach across the NFL is comprehensive. Gamers within each locker room undoubtedly have their own copies and challenge each other during games. 
Even one of the game’s most reserved and self-controlled figures — and one of the greatest coaches in the history of the sport — has his own exposure to the video game.
“I haven’t played it in quite a while,” Patriots coach Bill Belichick said Wednesday after he opened his press conference with a tribute to Madden. “When my kids were growing up, they would play it and I would watch them. They would beat me.”
Belichick grinned as he told that anecdote, likely thinking back on those memories with his children —two of whom, sons Steve (outside linebackers) and Brian (safeties), are assistants on New England’s staff.
Perhaps that’s the enduring legacy of the Madden NFL franchise. Similar to the way he used charm and humor in the broadcast booth to make the sport appealing to all, the video game allows even those without expertise in the NFL or even in football to simulate the strategy behind it.
“It’s a way for people to learn the game and participate in the game at a pretty sophisticated level,” Madden told Grantland.

source

Continue Reading

Games

Blizzard's new IP: Modern meets fantasy online survival game – TweakTown

Published

on

Blizzard’s next big IP might be an interesting take on a Kid in King Arthur’s Court and The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe.
Today Blizzard confirmed it is working on an ambitious new IP. The unnamed project is a survival game that merges modern and fantasy together, as per details gleaned from a brief concept art glimpse. Job listings also confirm the new IP will be an online-based adventure which is Blizzard’s usual fare.
“Blizzard is embarking on our next quest. We are going on a journey to a whole new universe, home to a brand-new survival game for PC and console. A place full of heroes we have yet to meet, stories yet to be told, and adventures yet to be lived. A vast realm of possibility, waiting to be explored,” reads a job posting.
We’ve known about Blizzard’s new IPs for a long time. The company has been incubating this new IP and another unannounced multiplayer shooter for a while, and Blizzard is also trying to create a shared games engine to power its future titles.
Alan Adham discussed the new incubation pipeline back in August 2021:
“We’re tight-lipped about it, but our new game pipeline has been in development for many years and it’s greater than it’s ever been across our core franchises and mobile, new IP and new genres. I’m looking forward to our teams launching their already announced new games in the not-too-distant future and in due course announcing a few new ones that you’ve yet to hear about,” Adham said.
So what is Blizzard working on? Here’s a selection:
Derek Strickland
Derek joined the TweakTown team in 2015 and has since reviewed and played 1000s of hours of new games. Derek is absorbed with the intersection of technology and gaming, and is always looking forward to new advancements. With over six years in games journalism under his belt, Derek aims to further engage the gaming sector while taking a peek under the tech that powers it. He hopes to one day explore the stars in No Man’s Sky with the magic of VR.

source

Continue Reading

Trending