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Samsung Smart Monitor M5 & M7 review Malaysia: A smart idea – SoyaCincau.com

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I feel like I’ve been asking for this for some time now. It just makes sense, right? With how smart everything is, and how many people are stepping away from terrestrial TV in favour of streaming services, a smart monitor just seems to make sense—especially if you live in a small apartment or dorm.
With that in mind, meet the Samsung Smart Monitor M5 and Smart Monitor M7, two brand new monitors from one of the biggest smart TV manufacturers in the world. On paper, it sounds like a killer combination: the portability and function of a monitor with the excellent smarts of Samsung’s Tizen operating system? Sign me up!
But, the truth is, reality is often a little less rosy than that.
That part is easy to explain. Samsung basically took their refined Tizen smart TV operating system and slapped them onto two different monitor screens. You’ve got the more affordable, and accessible M5 that tops out at Full HD, and the more expensive M7 which kicks resolution up to 4K.
It’s not just a small smart TV because there is no port for you to stick an antenna in. And it’s not just a monitor because it comes with a remote that you can use to control the smart TV OS. But if I’m being honest, all of that is just a technicality.
What matters is how it performs, and for a period of about a month, that’s exactly what I’ve been trying to find out. I spent most of my time with the 32” 4K Smart Monitor M7, but I’ve also had the chance to check out the smaller 27” Smart Monitor M5 that sits on my colleague Hanif’s desk.
And after this one month, I have to say that as a whole, I really like what they’ve done here. If the attempt was to combine the best parts of a TV with the best parts of a monitor, then I think Samsung has done it…for the most part.
The most obvious difference between this and your typical monitor, is that this Smart Monitor comes with a remote. Depending on which model you get, you’ll get a slightly different remote, but functionally they’re identical. 
What I like most about having a remote for a regular monitor is that you can make all your display tweaks and settings without needing to fiddle around with tiny unmarked buttons below the display, or with a finicky joystick.
It also makes it really easy to switch between using it as a typical monitor and as a smart TV. Just hit the home button and you’ll be greeted with a small menu that’ll give you quick access to the preinstalled apps as well as any and all settings. Here, you can immediately switch to one of those apps without interrupting your workflow on your connected computer.
The remote also has pre-programmed buttons for Netflix and Amazon Prime Video that will bring you directly to each app, which is super convenient. This made switching between working and taking a quick Netflix lunch break happen at the touch of a button. Once I was done with my break, I could hop right back to HDMI and pick up where I left off. 
On top of that, the VA panel Samsung has bundled into the M5 and M7 monitors is more than good enough if you treat it like a small TV. Kick a little back from your usual “computer seating position” and I think you’ll have a great experience, especially on the larger M7 with the 4K panel. As a smart TV, I definitely prefer the larger screen on the M7, especially with that 4K resolution, compared to the Full HD M5 models. 
Colours and contrast looked great when I was watching content on Netflix. Though, the panel isn’t quite what I’d call state-of-the-art as it only has a max brightness of 250 nits (peak brightness was not listed). Surprisingly, it supports HDR10 (not HDR10+) which I always thought required at least 1000 nits of peak brightness.
Would I have liked a brighter panel? Yes, absolutely. But after a few weeks with this monitor, even in the brightly lit SoyaCincau offices, I didn’t really have an issue with watching smart TV content on it. 
What I particularly liked about the smart TV half of these monitors are their built-in speakers. I’m not sure about your experiences, but for me, built-in monitor speakers have always been terrible. They’re like there for the sake of being there. But on the Samsung M5 and Samsung M7 smart monitors, you get speakers that are much closer to the built-in speakers you’d find on a TV instead of a monitor.
To an audiophile, this probably won’t be very impressive, but I think that the built-in speakers on these monitors are more than enough to replace a pair of cheap sub-RM100 computer speakers. They’ve got a pretty full sound with plenty of volume (again, easily adjustable with the remote), and I think they sound way better than most laptop speakers out there. 
And, if you do have a proper audio setup you’d rather use, switching between audio outputs with the remote is also super easy. You can even set different audio output settings for when you’re using it as a smart TV and when you’re using it as a computer monitor so you won’t be in for any unwanted surprises when switching between the two.
You can even pair Bluetooth headphones or speakers to the monitor if you want to keep your desk clean, so the audio options here are honestly quite plentiful. The only people who wouldn’t be happy are those that want an RCA connection because neither the M5 nor M7 have those.
I think that as a smart TV, I wasn’t really left wanting much else from the Samsung Smart Monitor M7. It was about the right size, had great controls, good speakers and a nice interface. My issue with it comes from:
For starters, the Samsung Smart Monitor M7 comes with an atrocious monitor stand. It’s small, short, and wobbles when you type with it on the table. On top of that, there’s barely any adjustability—the only thing it can do is tilt. Samsung, this is a monitor whose price tag starts in the four digits, couldn’t you give me at least some basic adjustment?
I’ll concede that the wobbling isn’t nearly as bad on the smaller 27” M5, but that’s about all the consolation I can give for this included stand. There is a silver lining: both the M5 and M7 will support stands with VESA mounts (100mm) so you can pick up a better third party stand.
Next, there’s the display. While I think it’s pretty good for viewing content like you would on a smart TV, this doesn’t seem to translate well when you’re using it as a monitor. When I use it as a smart TV from a viewing distance of about 130cm (just over 4ft), image quality looks fine. But, when I get closer while using it as a monitor (about 60cm, or just under 2ft) the poor viewing angles become much more apparent.
Colours start to warp in the corners of the display, and you also lose brightness when you turn your head or look at it at any angle but straight on. I’m not entirely sure if it’s something to do with my eyesight, but having used large monitors (IPS, OLED) before, I don’t remember having this same issue. I will note that this isn’t as big of an issue on the smaller Full HD 27” Smart Monitor M5, and I think that makes the smaller monitor better suited for computer/office use.
The monitor also doesn’t look well colour calibrated out of the box, and the picture mode presets are now limited to just Dynamic and Standard. And even then, switching between the two modes didn’t seem to do anything on my screen. You can dive into the settings and tweak the individual RGB tones in the colour temperature setting, so if you’re someone who wants something super accurate for colour work, you might want to have it calibrated before you use it.
Regarding ports, there’s good and bad news here. On the Smart Monitor M7, you’re getting three USB-A ports and one USB-C port. The USB-C port can be used for display, and charging (up to 65W), which means with the right cable you can hook up your computer to the monitor and use it as a hub as well, which is great. The M5 doesn’t come with USB-C and only has two USB-A ports. There are also two HDMI ports, one with ARC (for soundbars, etc).
However, you won’t find any DisplayPorts or Ethernet. The monitor also doesn’t support fast refresh rates (topping out at 60Hz), and there’s no mention of G-SYNC or FreeSync support either. 
That being said, one aspect which it edges out most standard monitors has to be the wireless connectivity. As I mentioned earlier, you can connect Bluetooth speakers to the smart monitors for audio, but you can also connect Bluetooth peripherals and use it to interface with the monitor too. You can even wirelessly cast stuff via Miracast or Apple AirPlay which is always handy. There’s even the PC on Screen function that lets you work on a computer remotely directly on the monitor itself.
Samsung’s Smart Monitors also benefit Samsung users with its support for wireless DeX, but in our experience, the connectivity process was a little more finnicky than it should have been—we had to disconnect the monitor from our WiFi connection before it would connect to DeX. But for non-Samsung users, this shouldn’t affect you.
After my month with Samsung’s new smart monitors, I found that they perform much better as small smart TVs than they do as monitors, especially the larger 32″ Smart Monitor M7. Or maybe as monitors for creatives like me who need good colour accuracy and prioritise image quality as well as good viewing angles. I don’t think they’d be good enough for PC gamers either, with the lack of DP and fast refresh rate options.
But, I don’t think it would be fair to call it a bad product. I can see what Samsung is going for here, and it’s the kind of hybrid product I was asking for not that long ago. And I can also understand that it’s not easy to make a good hybrid product, especially one that is to be sold at a reasonable price point.
And yes, I don’t think that these monitors are overly expensive. Searching online, what I found is that comparable monitors—both in size and features—weren’t a whole lot cheaper than Samsung’s Smart Monitors. The 27” Smart Monitor M5 we have is priced at RM1,288 (Lazada, Shopee) while the 32” Smart Monitor M7 is priced at RM1,999 (Lazada, Shopee).
From my research, this makes them at about RM200-RM300 more expensive than a standard monitor. So, if you wanted to build a similar setup with a regular monitor and something like a Mi Box or Mi TV stick, the price should work out to be about the same. But you don’t get the slim, well-built, all-in-one chassis you get with Samsung’s Smart Monitors.
That said, is this product a necessity? No, I wouldn’t say that. After all, you can access all the most popular streaming services and more with your computer browser—so functionally, this kind of Smart Monitor doesn’t really add much.
What it does bring is convenience and refinement thanks to the included remote and Tizen OS. It felt great to just grab the remote, kick back on the couch after work and watch some content. Well, that and the solid built-in speakers. 
Though, if you were going to pick one up, I’d recommend one of the Full HD Smart Monitor M5 models instead. I think the lower price point and practically identical functionality makes it a far more prudent choice. Yes, the 4K resolution is nice to have, but I don’t think resolution alone is enough to make up the price difference—especially when the rest of the panel is pretty much identical.
Photography by Hanif Azrai with the Sony A7 III.

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Google Pixel 6 vs Samsung Galaxy S21: Which affordable flagship should you buy? – XDA Developers

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Samsung has established itself as one of the leaders of the Android smartphone space. Barring an occasional misfire, the company has consistently produced some fantastic flagship smartphones. So whenever another Android manufacturer produces a flagship, it gets compared to the Samsung flagship. As a part of the same tradition, now it’s the turn of Pixel 6 to get this treatment with the Galaxy S21.
This article will pit the Google Pixel 6 vs Samsung Galaxy S21 to see how the two flagships stack up against each other.
Navigate this guide:
Google Pixel 6
There is nothing extraordinary about the design of either Pixel 6 or Galaxy S21. But both smartphones look great and have a premium look. While the Pixel 6 is a glass sandwich, Samsung has opted for a plastic back on the S21, unlike other S21 series phones.
The plastic back of the S21 has a matte finish and doesn’t look cheap. While glass certainly looks better, plastic has an advantage in terms of durability. And as most people use a case with their phone, the back is anyway going to be hidden. While we are on the topic of cases, make sure to check out our handpicked best Pixel 6 cases and Galaxy S21 cases if you end up buying one of these phones.
Although the Pixel 6 is the smaller phone in the Pixel 6 series, it’s still a massive phone with a 6.4-inch screen. On the other hand, the S21 feels reasonably smaller with its 6.2-inch screen and better screen-to-body ratio. Thanks to its plastic back and smaller overall footprint, the Samsung phone is also over 35 grams lighter than the Pixel.
While both the Pixel 6 and the Galaxy S21 use AMOLED panels, Samsung has gone with a 120Hz screen, whereas the Pixel 6 has a 90Hz display. In addition, the S21 screen gets slightly brighter than the Pixel 6.
Overall, the Galaxy S21 has a slight advantage on the display front with its higher refresh rate screen and brightness. That said, most people won’t be able to tell the difference between a 90Hz panel and a 120Hz panel.
Samsung Galaxy S21
Instead of relying on Qualcomm for a smartphone chip, Google developed its own chip this year based on Samsung Exynos 2100. This Tensor chip powers the Pixel 6, and it’s a pretty good first attempt. Like all flagship-grade chips, it can handle everything with ease, and you won’t have to worry about lag or stuttering. The chip also helps Google offer several machine learning and artificial intelligence-backed features right on the device, which won’t be possible on other smartphone chips.
Samsung has gone with the Qualcomm Snapdragon 888 SoC in the US, and other markets get the Exynos 2100 SoC. Snapdragon 888 is a top-notch processor, and we have already seen its excellent performance in several phones this year.
In addition, both phones have 8GB of RAM and 128GB or 256GB of onboard storage.
Google Pixel 6
The Pixel phones are known for their prowess, but Samsung flagships aren’t slackers either in this department. As a result, both the Pixel 6 and Galaxy S21 take amazing photos, and picking between them depends on which aesthetic you prefer. For example, the Pixel 6 photos have high contrast and a cooler white balance, whereas the Galaxy S21 photos have an oversaturated look and high brightness.
In terms of raw camera specifications, you get a 50MP primary shooter (takes 12.5MP photos), a 12MP wide-angle camera, and an 8MP selfie shooter. The Galaxy S21 has a 12MP primary camera, a 12MP wide-angle shooter, a 64MP telephoto shooter, and a 10MP selfie camera.
All in all, S21’s telephoto shooter gives the phone one advantage over the Pixel 6, which, unlike the Pixel 6 Pro, doesn’t have a telephoto camera. So if you like to take a lot of photos with the telephoto camera, you are better off with the Samsung phone.
Samsung Galaxy S21
The Pixel 6 houses a 4,614mAh battery, whereas you get a 4,000mAh battery with the S21. This difference in the battery size impacts how long the two phones last. While both phones will easily power through an entire day on a single charge, the moderate user will be able to steal another half day on the Pixel 6, which is harder on the S21.
The Galaxy S21 has a slight edge in fast charging capabilities as the phone supports 25W fast charging. While the Pixel 6 comes with an advertised fast charging speed of 30W, the phone can only charge up to at 21W. Meaning the S21 will charge quicker than the Pixel 6 with a compatible fast charger.
In terms of connectivity, the S21 supports both mmWave and sub-6GHz 5G on all three major operators—AT&T, T-Mobile, and Verizon—in the US. On the other hand, Pixel 6 supports mmWave 5G only on AT&T and Verizon, T-Mobile users get stuck with sub-6GHz 5G support.
On the software front, the Pixel 6 runs stock Android 12 out of the box. The Galaxy S21 comes with Android 11 with One UI. But it is already receiving the Android 12 and One UI 4.0 update.
In addition, the Pixel 6 and the S21 will both get three years of Android updates. But the Galaxy S21 will only get four years of security patches, compared to five years for the Pixel 6.
Google Pixel 6
Google has priced the Pixel 6 quite aggressively. It starts at $599 for the 128GB version. On the other hand, the S21 retails beginning at $799. This difference in pricing gives Pixel a significant edge over the Samsung phone.
There are three color options for the Pixel 6—Stormy Black, Kinda Coral, and Sorta Seafoam—whereas the S21 comes in four colors—Phantom Violet, Phantom Gray, Phantom White, and Phantom Pink.
Given the price difference between the Galaxy S21 and Pixel 6, the Google phone certainly seems like a better purchase. But if you prefer a 120Hz display or telephoto shooter and can snag the Samsung phone for cheap during a sale, it’s also an excellent buy. On the other hand, if you don’t care for these two things, the Pixel 6 is a pretty well-rounded package at a great price.
Which of the two phones are you planning to buy? Let us know in the comments section. Meanwhile, don’t forget to check the best deals on the Pixel 6 and the Galaxy S21 to save some money. We’ve also picked the best screen protectors for the Pixel 6 and the Galaxy S21, which can help you safeguard those AMOLED displays from scratches.


XDA » Buying Guides » Google Pixel 6 vs Samsung Galaxy S21: Which affordable flagship should you buy?
Gaurav has been covering technology for over a decade now. He has done everything from blogging about Android to reporting the latest from the world of Internet giants. When he is not writing about the tech companies, he can be found binge-watching new TV series on the web. You can reach Gaurav at [email protected]
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Exclusive: Google Pixel 6 Pro renders with triple camera setup and curved display – Digit

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The Google Pixel 6 Pro is expected to launch sometime later this year alongside the Pixel 6. The Pixel 6 Pro has been leaked with some of its key information out in the open including some high resolution renders that we have obtained from popular tipster OnLeaks. With the Pixel 6 lineup, Google is looking to double down its efforts in the smartphone market and could launch a completely redesigned Pixel smartphone for 2021. While the information on the Pixel 6 Pro is scarce at the moment, we do get a first look at how the phone might end up looking like. Here’s everything we know about the Pixel 6 Pro.

The Google Pixel 6 Pro features a 6.67-inch curved display that also has a punch-hole cutout in the centre for the selfie camera. The screen has minimal bezels on the sides and also features an in-display fingerprint sensor. The display could be a top-of-the-line AMOLED panel that may or may not support a high refresh rate.

Google Pixel 6 Pro has a horizontal camera island on the back that extends from the left edge to the right edge. It is also slightly protruded and houses triple cameras. The phone measures roughly 163.9 x 75.8 x 8.9 millimetres and has an overall thickness of 11.5 millimetres including the camera bump.

The Pixel 6 Pro has dual stereo speakers that consist of a top and bottom speaker unit. The phone also supports wireless charging and will likely support fast wired charging as well.
We currently have no word on which chipset will be powering the Pixel 6 lineup but we expect to know more about the phone in the second half of 2021.

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Malaysia Stock Market May Regain Wednesday's Losses – Nasdaq

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Malaysia Stock Market May Regain Wednesday’s Losses  Nasdaq
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